70 answers

Help! My Hands Fall Asleep All the Time!

This is so weird! Since the birth of my son on October 10, 2007, I noticed that my hands were falling asleep or getting tingles in them. At first is happened when I was pumping (holding the pumps) or breastfeeding (hloding baby's head) but now they fall asleep or get tingles doing other things like talking on the phone, driving, or just doing nothing. This never happened with my other child and it is really freaking me out. I called my OB and explained the problem and was told that this was not a normal or general post-partum issue. It was suggested I go to my general practitioner, who then might refer me to a neurologist. But tingly fingers is a circulation issue, right? I hate to incure a lot of medical bills right now because we are still paying off hospital bills from my baby's 6-week premature birth. This happens throughout the whole day--like maybe 10 times a day. Has anyone had this problem? I am 38 years old, fit, a dancer and yoga teacher.

What can I do next?

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This happened somewhat to me after the first child. It eventually went away, but it took about 1 year. My OB and GP seemed to think it might be due to epideral (but I still had one with second child). Just FYI.
Good luck

I don't know if this helps but last year I too noticed the same problem. I would sometimes wake up in the middle of the night to find my hands tingling or fallen asleep. I talked to my doctor about it and I got no help. He said maybe I'm gripping things to hard. So I decided to go to a chiropractor and told my chiro doctor about my hands falling asleep or tingling sensation. He took several X-rays (which only cost me $45)and told me that my head is not aligned to my body. He specialize in Upper Cervical and ever since then (its been 2 months)I have no more tingling or hands falling asleep and no more migranes too. I've never felt better. As a matter of fact my husband who suffers from severe allergies also started seing the same doctor. He used to take allergy pills everyday but not anymore. I hope this helps.

That sounds like carpal tunnel syndrome and maybe not. But I have the same symptoms and that's what I have been diagnosed with. Here is more info... hope it helps you. I've been told to put ice packs on the wrists to alleviate the symptoms.
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/carpaltunnelsyndrome.html

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I don't know if it could be similar to what a friend of mine is experiencing right no? She has been diagnosed with pregnancy induced carpal tunnel. She has not delivered her baby yet but the symptoms sound very similar and I know she is very uncomfortable because of it. I do know that they have told her there is really nothing they can do but your OB or general practitioner might be able to let you know if they think that is what it might be and that would save you the time and money of going to a nuerologist. Hope that helps in some way!

1 mom found this helpful

I second the Chiropractic advice! GO!!! It WILL help! What is happening to you is very common. Notice you mentioned the common denominators of when the sensations were starting. Think of the positioning of your head, and therefore, your neck. The whole basis of Chiropractic is to remove interference, and allow the body to function the way it was designed. Your neck is most likley out of alignment, causing the nerves that control the sensation in your hands to be pinched, and therefore.....tingling fingers and numbness. I highly recommend my Chiropractor: Dr. Melissa Shelton ###-###-####. She at Preston and Hedcoxe just south of 121.
Good Luck!
J.

Dear C.,

I ditto the Chiropractor idea. I have a old friend that is one, and when I told him about my sister, that first had surgury on her wrist, then elbow , and then finally her shoulder.

NONE of which relieved the issue!

Said that he could fix it with adjustments to her spine.

She hasn't done any more with it.

P.

You might have carpel tunnel syndrome or tendonitis in your wrists that are causing your hands to go numb/tingle. I developed tendonitis in one wrist after the birth of my daughter and it caused my hand to feel tingly or numb sometimes.(it would hurt too when I moved it a certain way). I was told by a orthopedic doctor that this is common post partum because you are moving your hands in certain ways and overusing certain muscles that you weren't using before baby. I would perhaps go see an orthopedic surgeon. They had me wear a wrist/hand brace for a while and it's actually gotten better.

Good Luck!
N.

Carpel tunnel.

I had it with both pregnancies and afterwards. You can buy $20 wrist braces at CVS (buy the ones with metal inside). The more you wear them, the better. I wore them 24 hours a day with my second pregnancy. You can also get massages but go to someone who knows about carpel tunnel - let me know if you need the number of my lady. I also "iced" my arms down with cold packs from the freezer every night before bed. If it is terrible, there is surgery for it (my grandmother had it), but I just live with mine.

Sounds like a pinched nerve. I would go see your Chiropractor. Massages can be very helpful too (and to lower your costs since you are paying medical bills try a massage school)

Did you just talk to one of the staff at the OB office or did you talk to the DR? If not you need to talk to the Dr. first and if no help there your next step would be your G.P.

Sounds like carpal tunnel syndrome to me. Your G.P. should be able to help you.

I realize this is way after your original post. You probably have already been to see the doctor and know what going on, but if you haven't this might help. I was diagnosed with a circulation disorder called Reynauds. Since it is a circulation thing in addition to your hand being numb and tingly, it also gets cold and kind of blue because there isn't as much blood going through there. With Reynauds there are certain things that can trigger an "attack" such as a repetitive motion, vibration, or sudden extreme cold (putting your hand in the freezer). I also wear a wrist brace for this. It just helps with some of the pain associated with it.

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