16 Month Old Son Not Really Talking

Updated on March 05, 2010
K.T. asks from Fresno, CA
43 answers

Hi Moms! My son will be 17 months in 10 days and he still doesn't really say anything. He babbles a lot, dadadadada and a lot of vowel sounds but he really isn't contecting dada with the dadadadada. He waives hi and bye to people but won't say the words. He is really good about doing the things that I ask him to so I know that he understands what I am saying. I just that I am just worried! So, I was just wondering what is the normal age for children to start talking?

What can I do next?

  • Add yourAnswer own comment
  • Ask your own question Add Question
  • Join the Mamapedia community Mamapedia
  • as inappropriate
  • this with your friends

Featured Answers

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

E.H.

answers from San Francisco on

different chilldren decide to talk at different ages. It's like reading, where some kids read at 5 and others not until 8 or so.
Don't worry; he'll talk when he's ready!
(Mother of 3 fine talkers)

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.H.

answers from Sacramento on

When my #2 son was that age until school, he did very little talking, when he did we thought he was going to need a speech therapist, he didn't and is now grown and owns his own Mortgage Company. Enjoy every moment of this small fry, just keep reading to him & lots of hugs! :)

A. H

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

N.J.

answers from San Francisco on

Don't worry! Neither of my daughters talked until they were about 2; my nephew was the same, and one of my husband's brothers didn't talk until he was 3! All are completely conversational now. Just remember, there is a wide range of what is normal. Relax - the words will come soon.

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.V.

answers from San Francisco on

I am no expert but a friend of mine took her 14 month old daughter into the doctor and the doctor said that if in a few months she was not yet saying a few words that the doctor would be concerned. I think the best thing to do would to be consult with your doctor. My son is 17 months and started talking early so it's hard for me to gauge, but it took him the longest time to get down clapping for instance. I don't think you should be overly concerned but it is great if you are proactive. If there is something wrong you want to know so you can fix it as soon as possible and if there isn't something wrong you want to know so you can stop worrying.

2 moms found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.L.

answers from San Francisco on

K.;

My now 13-year-old son, David, was the same way. He was almost two years old before he really started talking, but one day, it was like a switch kicked in and he just started talking in complete sentences. On the other hand, he started RUNNING at 9 mos, never really walked. And today, he's quite an athlete, though he's a smart kid, his dream is to be a stuntman one day. So, don't stress yourself out. When Aiden is ready to talk, he'll talk.

Good luck, mama.
- L.
Oakland, CA

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.T.

answers from San Francisco on

This is still normal. Many kids don't start talking until 2 to 2 1/2 years. Nevertheless, it is good to continue to work with him. When I see these kids in my clinic, I make sure and do hearing testing. In addition, I do further developmental testing at 18 months. It is important to know if he is making all his motor milestones and to know how well he socializes. If I have any concerns, I would have him then see a developmental specialist.

J. Timm, MD

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.H.

answers from San Francisco on

I'm not sure if there is a really normal age for kids to do anything. If your pediatrician is worried, then maybe ask what options are out there, but: a friend of mine has a son that is now 9 years old. He didn't say much of anything for the first few years of his life. He understood well, as your son seems to, and was very mechanically inclined. He loved to play with toys and put stuff together, and be read to, etc.. At around 3 and a half or four he really started to blossom. He started conversing quite regularly and now is a wonderfully bright and happy kid. I think babies are just all so different. He may feel he is communicating with you well enough to get his needs met, and so that is fine for now, for him. I think many times we get caught up in the babies around us that do everything like clock work. It makes us feel as though something is wrong with our little one. When, in reality, it is usually that they just aren't ready for that step yet. Again, I would check with your pediatrician if you are really concerned, and see if there are motor skills tests or something, if she thinks it necessary, but, I would bet he is just progressing at his own pace.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.C.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi K.,

I have 2 girls 5 yrs. and 21 mo., my first started talking relatively early so I was also concerned when my second one was really only saying daddy at 15 months. Her pediatrician assured me that it is normal. After she turned 19 mo. she really began repeating words that she heard. I have come to realize that she is more of an observer whereas my first daughter loves to talk about everything. All kids are different and will do things at different times. Try not to be too concerned.

K.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.S.

answers from Salinas on

My son is 17 1/2 months and only says dada and mama. I am not the least bit worried nor should you. If they were 2 and had this vocabulary then I would approach a specialist. I have a 4 year old daughter so I know any day more words will come and it will domino. Be patient.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.R.

answers from San Francisco on

Hello!
My son also was a delayed speaker. The doctor kept threatening speech therapy, but when the deadline came, he spoke. He didn't really start talking until his 2nd birthday. Now he'll be 3 years old next month and sometimes we wished he'd talk a little less! Nothing to panic about at 17 months. He has plenty of time. It will happen all of a sudden and then his vocabbulary will just explode and you won't believe what will come out of his mouth! Hang in there!
A.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

B.K.

answers from San Francisco on

I'm really glad you decided to write and ask about this. Please speak to your pediatrician immediately and ask that she or he refer your child to your local Regional Center for an assessment. If your pediatrician tries to reassure you and tell you not to worry about it, insist on the referral. Your child may turn out to be fine, but what you describe are significant delays. What you describe are the sounds a child should be making before they are 8 months old. By 9 months babies are expected to respond to their own name. By 12 months they should be using dada, mama to specifically refer to father, mother. By 18 months the minimum number of words a baby is expected to use regularly is 8. Babies at this age can be capable of vocabularies of 70 words+, but the very minimum is 8.

Early intervention for delays is essential, and many children end up right where their peers are after getting the right help. Please don't wait. I work professionally with children 0-5, and I strongly recommend you seek professional consultation. It is always better to err on that side that to wait and see. Good for you for recognizing there might be something going on, and asking about it.

Good luck, and please let us know what happens.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.P.

answers from Redding on

It looks like you have already gotten a ton of feedback, but I felt that I should still throw in my 2 cents. I had a little different situation, but none the less I was concerned about my child's language delays, and my pediatrician told me that he is a boy, that we are allowing him to be lazy, and that he will be just fine, so not to worry. I still wasn't comfortable with the wait & see approach, and I'm glad I pursued it, because my son has autism. He really needed to start therapies as soon as possible, and had I sat around & waited for him to talk on his own it would not have happened. So my advice is contact a speech therapist or regional center & have him evaluated. Maybe there is nothing to be concerned about, but I would rather be safe than regret it later.
Good Luck,
J.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.P.

answers from San Francisco on

The average age for a child to begin talking with 1-2 words is between the ages of 12-24 months. At this time, children begin imitating their caregivers one word models and have an ecpressive vocabulary of 3-20 words they use often (these are mostly nouns). If you are concerned with your child's speech and language development you could see your pediatrician and he/she can make an appropriate referral for an evaluation if necessary.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.D.

answers from San Francisco on

HI K., I know how you feel. My (now 23 month old) had very few words by then as well. Her doctor said not to be worried - that by 18 months she should have about 20. We just kept reading to her, and talking about EVERYTHING we could. When we were driving I would talk about what we saw outside; when doing anything in the house I would talk through every detail. Singing songs a lot too. My daughter also uses sign language - so she uses the signs not the words still. Now she has about 50 words and gains 1 or 2 a week. It was hard for me when other same age children were talking in 2 -3 word phrases already. Remember that all children develop at their own pace. But if you don't see growth by 18 months then I would ask your doctor. I hope that helps.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.N.

answers from San Francisco on

I had the same problem with my now-four-year-old.

Alex didn't speak but two words by age three. He would scream (it was horrible) because he couldn't make himself understood. We had his hearing tested (perfectly fine). By comparison his older brother was speaking in sentences by 18 months or so. It was frustrating for all of us.

You should be able to get your son assessed for speech delays at age three by your local school district. At that time, if he qualifies, he can receive speech therapy services from your school district. Mine has been in for over a year now and the progress he made just in four months was amazing--he still has some pronunciation issues that are being worked on but he's now mostly understandable and unless he's really tired and cranky the screeching has stopped.

When is the normal age to start talking? It just depends on the child. It's good that he's practicing with sounds but he may just need more time before he starts speaking. When we were worrying over Alex they checked comprehension and developmentally he was right on.

As long as yours is understanding what you're saying/asking and is practicing sounds I would sit back and see how it goes. Encourage him to say words but don't be frustrated if it doesn't happen. It may be that he will need speech therapy in 19 months but that's a major bonus, too--Alex has been in preschool two mornings a week with a speech therapist and the added benefit of being in a school program has helped him mature. As soon as his speech is where it should be he'll be exited from the program and that'll be that.

Over all--don't worry. He appears to be hearing and understanding you fine and the speech will come.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.S.

answers from San Francisco on

I would mention your concerns to his doctor at his 18 month checkup. But that it usuaaly ok and normal. Not all 16 month olds are talking yet. Does he make eye contact, point to things to show or share interest? Does he have any repetive behavior, insistance on sameness, or like to line things up, any loss of words? If not you should be ok but still mention it to his docotr and make sure that by the time he is 2 yrs old he can put two or more words together. My son was diagnosed with Autism at 2 yrs old and my doctor kept telling me that everthing was fine and not to worry when infact it wasn't.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.N.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi K.

I wouldn't worry about your son not really talking. Kids all develop at a different age and he could just start being a chatterbox in a couple of months. My kids are adults now but ea one talked at a different age. Now their the talkingest people I know besides me.

Anna

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.R.

answers from San Francisco on

My son is 2 and just started talking. I stressed about it for a long time too, and moms of boys a little older than him told me boys usually talk later than girls. Mainly around 2 and don't really get going till they are about 2.5. Now, I can't get him to STOP talking! He's lots of fun and everyday there are about 2 or 3 new words. Look, just enjoy the silence. Try not to compare him to others-you'll wear yourself out. I spoke with our ped at his 2 year check up in November cuz he wasn't talking by then and he told me as long as he is following commands and you see he understands you, there is nothing to worry about. If the comprehension isn't there, that's the issue. Sounds like that's not a problem for you guys. Walker did the same stuff you're talking about for a long time. Now he wants to talk about everything and talks about his friends and how he got wet at the park and on and on and on.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

R.U.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi K.:

Aiden is NOT abnormal. Very few boys are really talking at 17 months. He will start to talk (form individual words) as he approaches two. Relax. It's not that serious.

R.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.K.

answers from Chico on

HI there. My son Bodie is the exact same age and has the same vocabulary as Aiden. He is my 3rd and my other 2 could talk very well by this age. Bodie has a very developed sense of hummar, is advanced physically, and understands almost everything. They all just develop differently:)
I have been showing Bodie more baby signs lately and he has been learning each new sign instantly!!

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

H.S.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi K.,
Generally boys talk later than girls. My friends daughter didn't really say anything except mama, dada until 2.5 years old. Now she is 3.5, she talks just fine. So I don't think you need to worry at all. He is not even 2 yet.

H.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.C.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi K.,

I would not be too worried. My son will be 2 at the end of the month and still does not say much of anything. We try to teach him new words but he just does not seem interested in learning them. In time he will realize how much easier things will be when he talks so just give him some time. Every child is different,my first son was speaking in paragraphs by the time he was two so of course I expected the same with my second. It did not happen. Sometimes I think it is a blessing because my oldest talks enough for the both of them. LOL! Enjoy the quiet time while you have it. When he is ready he will amaze you with the things he will be able to say.

C.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

G.D.

answers from Modesto on

Go to your pediatrician and telll him or her the issues and they should know which agency services can check your child... in Modesto we have the MOUNTAIN VALLEY REGIONAL CENTER...and they just have to be called and reffer the child to them, they will contact you and send someone to look at him and if they see the problem then give the child free services!!!

Your pediatrician has to give you the name and phone number of the agency, you call and let them know what is your concern and start there... My prior pediatrician refused to see a problem and kept telling me that I was just paranoide...turns out my child is AUTISTIC!!! So don't let the doctor tell you you are exagerating!!! And let the agency check him!!! I am not saying he is autistic but lots of kids can have speech delays like appraxia...just let the experts keep an eye on it!!! Love, G.. :0)
P.S. they will test your child's ears, to make sure he is hearing, and all kinds of help you can get from them and for free!!! And if it turns out thereis a problem then he will get free services like speech therapy and so on!!!

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

R.C.

answers from Sacramento on

I have two boys: 3 years and 20 months. The older wasnt talking at nearly 27 months of age and I was thinking about speech therapy. My Husband and I put him into a daycare/preschool two mornings a week(very tough decision for us) just to see if that would help. Within the first month, he was talking like crazy. I think WE knew what he was saying with his body language so he didnt feel the need to say the words. When he went outside our home, he needed to communicate verbally in order for others to understand him. Also, he heard others his age talking and wanted to do the same.

My younger boy(20 months)has his own "language." We really have to listen to figure it out and Big Brother usually helps translate. For instance, he always uses the same noise for "thank you." He also does animal sounds rather than their names. I think, just my opinion, boys can be a bit more laid back and dont really feel the need to start talking. They would rather be curious and get into things. Take care. I hope this helps. Enjoy your boy, your pugs, and your family. I know life is crazy, being a working mom.

R.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.D.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi K.,
The most important thing to observe is your son's affect. He sounds deliciously happy. Language is a complicated thing; many educators speak of how our langauge in these times takes us away from our connection with ourselves. Indeed many therapies teach us to make sounds and movements that more closely approximate what we are experiencing within, to be how we were as babes. Many children who wait to speak are really taking things in deeply. They are delighting in the experience of being here. I will give you one example. A friend of mine who is a professor at UC Berkeley is a writer, a novelist. He waited until he was almost 4 to really start talking. He has described his experience to me of being in awe with the all of it has a child. He now can write the dream scapes. If your son wants help he will let you know. If he seems happy, then trust his inner wisdom. Don't worry, delight in him.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.L.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi K. T,
The website for American Speech and Hearing Association http://www.asha.org/public/speech/development/chart.htm
will give you a starting place to learn what is normal. I worked as a speech therapist in Nevada County for many years, with the birth to five population, and recommend that you start with the development chart, and if you still have concerns, contact the Nevada Couty Family Resource diagnostic team, at Champion Mine school. This service is free.
Best wishes,
Dee L

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.M.

answers from San Francisco on

hello lovely mommy! DON'T WORRY! It doesn't do any good, for one. And otherwise, your little guy WILL start talking. Every child is different. He's healthy? He sees his pediatrician regularly? It sounds like he's just fine, he IS using sounds and he understands, so he's GREAT! My second child is now 19 months and has FINALLY started saying a few words (completely different than my first who started saying words at 8 months! crazy). It's so great that my second has started saying words, funny thing is I'm one of the only people who understands her! Anyway - DON'T WORRY. Every child has a different time table to start talking. It sounds like he's right on track for his time table.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.C.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi K. I am the mother of 6 children my second born a wonderful daughter never spoke a word until just after her 2nd birthday, at that point the words just poured out of her I think it was because her sister went to school and she had to tell me what she wanted!. Every child is different.
Good luck

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

E.O.

answers from Redding on

what i have heard is that 18 words by 18 months is average. but also boys can tend to be slower. my son is almost 18 months now and is the same. i know he comprehends. i think my brother was the same, but when he did talk he took off with sentences. different learning styles and personalities. no worries, he isn't late. he is just not in a hurry. is he pointing at things for you to give him the names? then he is learning and just filing them for later. they will supprise us when the finally start. can't wait!

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.H.

answers from San Francisco on

Try not to worry, this is totally normal. My oldest (who is now 13 and never stops talking) simply did not have a lot he wanted to say before his second birthday, though he always got his point across. One of the most helpful articles I ever read said that a child can only focus on one Major milestone at a time. So while yours may not be too chatty, he may be fine tuning his large or small motor skills. My son liked to take apart his baby furniture and figure out how all his toys were put together. Kids chose what interests them at that time. Remember there is a wide range of normal development and celebrate what your son IS into right now, the talking will happen soon enough I promise!

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.B.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi K., My son is 13 now and he also talked late. My husband, I'm told, also talked late. When my son was the age of yours, he also babbled in 'partial words' like "ga" for airplane, "ba" for ball, "da" for dog, etc. He did connect the babble with specific things, although they were 'lumped' together ("ga" meant a LOT of different things to him, not just airplane ---and I've no idea why his brain put 'ga' with airplane). He was 2 years and about 3 or 4 months before he began to say full words and then string 2 or more of them together for super-short sentences. My mil told me that my husband was around the same age, 2 - 2&1/2 yo before communicating with words/language. I know parents who had children who spoke late like my son and others whose children did have speech or other problems (delaying language development) and needed intervention. I'd bring it up with your son's pediarician and go from there. It may be nothing, it may be something. FYI, once my son began to talk, hoo-boy, there was no stopping him. (Hubby, too) :o)
I love your son's name, btw. I have a gf whose oldest is named Aden and I considered the name when pg, too. I loved the meaning... "little fire". And, pugs are one of the cutest dogs, imo. Love them, too. (We have a boxer/shepherd mix).
Also, this is totally off-topic, but I'm curious about your occupation. We home school and "educational travel" sounds appealing. I'd love to know a little more about it. Feel free to email me ([email protected]____.com).

A little about me:
I am 38 years old (and counting), married 14 years, and home schooling SAHM to our 13 yo son. We also lost a son at birth.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.J.

answers from San Francisco on

I think that as long as he understands "direction" he will be fine. They say boys begin to speak later than little girls. My son is also 17 mos. and can repeat some words but he understands direction really well. We also use sign language which is very helpful because he can "Tell" me what he wants and this avoids a lot of frustation on both sides.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

G.C.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi there.
My friends son was the same. It turned out that he had alot of wax in his ears and as soon as the doctor fixed that the talking started.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.M.

answers from San Francisco on

My son was diagnosed as speech delayed (he said "ma" and "no") at just under 2 years old. However, on his 3rd birthday he said a full sentence! We'd had his hearing tested (I didn't think there was a problem there because he did what he was told, when questions were asked he would respond in his way, he'd watch his Disney movies and dance to the music--so we knew he could hear). It was discovered that he had lack of nerve endings in his mouth (he was a very picky eater, bad nurser, but would dive into the jalapeno (sp?) chips and eat hot peppers. I had him evaluated by the speech therapist at the local school district at 2 years old and they started an early intervention program (don't wait until they are in school). He attended speech therapy with me once a week, but what really worked was my sitting down with him everyday and in front of a mirror trying to get him to make the sounds of the letters, and his reward would be a mini M&M. I also played Disney sing along tapes all the time in the car (one day after his 3rd birthday he sang along), played with him with toys that made noises and imitated them, made animal sounds, etc. One of his favorite activities was to put bandages all over his stuffed animals and I'd say "OW!!" and this rip off the bandage ("Rip"). I'd say OW my arm, Ow my leg, etc. and eventually (when he turned 3) he'd make his own sounds. I invested in a lot of bandages (Costco) and a lot of time with him, and now I can't get him to shut up (he's 13--no speech problems after he turned 3). Some just take a little longer, and a little more attention to get them going. Remember, they say Einstein didn't talk until he was 4!

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.A.

answers from Merced on

Hi K.,

I am the mom of 5 kids ranging from 27 to 15,6 grandkids ages 17 months to 7, I've helped raise about 14 others and am raising my 5 and 7 year old granddaughters, so this is something I think I have quite a bit of experience on.
Children happen to do things in (their) own time,and it's all NORMAl. If it will make you feel more comfortable, take your son to a speech therapist and get their oppinion, but quite honestly your son is just working in his time table. My grandson Isaiah didn't really talk until he was 2, he is 3 now and still talks only when he wants to. One day your son will just start talking out of the blue and then you might wish for these days back : )
Don't talk baby talk to him, talk to him as if he was already able to conversate back to you, just love him and let him know that you will wait until he is ready to let you hear his words.
Take care, Necola

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.H.

answers from Redding on

Hi K.,

My son (now almost 8) didn't start really talking until he hit his 2nd birthday. I used to think something was wrong with him because he could understand what I was saying, but...his doctor told me that he would talk when he was ready and not to worry about it. Within 2 weeks of turning 2 he was jabbering away and still hasn't stopped.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.C.

answers from San Francisco on

Hello K.,
I just wanted to say you are not alone! My daughter is sixteen months old and can not say words or connect them either! Not only that she can't walk yet! So I am really worried and anxious! It is driving me crazy! I can't help but feel that I am doing something wrong! I believe I read somewhere that if they are not walking or talking by 18 months then it would be time to worry! But I am realizing that things I read are not necessarily true so I just let me doctor know! I feel for you and you are not alone at all!
M.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.A.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi K.... Don't be too worried about your almost 17 month old son speaking yet, as long as he's absorbing what you're saying to him, his 'tape recorder' is on, so to speak. As a mother to 3 {grown now} and gramma to 3, none of them were speaking many words at that age, and boys are sometimes slower to talk than girls. My 22 month old grand son is only saying a few words. so don't worry, and enjoy him while he's this age. CJ

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.J.

answers from San Francisco on

I was in the same boat with my second son just a few months ago. My older son, who is 4, had a few words by 16 months, so I was a little concerned about #2. I talked to a speech therapist and she suggested that I take him to Regional Center to have him assessed since he was only babbling. She said something might be wrong and got me a little freaked out. However, I decided I would just wait a few more months, and if nothing happended, then I'd go. Well, by 20 months the little guy was saying single words. By 24 months he could mimick pretty much anything we'd say to him, and now, at 26 months, he speaks in 3-5 word sentences much of the time, and has a really large vocabulary. He has surpassed whenre his older brother was at this stage. What I learned is that they all develop at their own pace. Don't worry, just wait and see what happens, at least for a few more months. Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.B.

answers from San Francisco on

Speech milestones established by the National Institutes of Health are located at http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/voice/speechandlanguage.asp

12 to 17 months
Attends to a book or toy for about two minutes.
Follows simple directions accompanied by gestures.
Answers simple questions nonverbally.
Points to objects, pictures, and family members.
Says two to three words to label a person or object (pronunciation may not be clear)
Tries to imitate simple words.

18 to 23 months
Enjoys being read to.
Follows simple commands without gestures.
Points to simple body parts such as "nose."
Understands simple verbs such as "eat," "sleep."
Correctly pronounces most vowels and n, m, p, h, especially in the beginning of syllables and short words. Also begins to use other speech sounds.
Says 8 to 10 words (pronunciation may still be unclear).
Asks for common foods by name.

I work at an ear clinic, we always recommend ruling out hearing impairment as the source of speech delays

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

I.S.

answers from San Francisco on

As long as he's comprehending speach he's on track. Pointing or looking towards something you're talking about or following simple directions should be a sign that he understands the spoken word. Actual word formation is very difficult but he may find it more fun to mimic the sounds animals make like moo or meow or woof. If he's struggling to communicate to you then sign language would be fun for both of you... it's amazing what even a 6mo old has to say with their hands when they know someone understands them :)

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.B.

answers from San Francisco on

My 5 year old actually didn't talk until he was 2. Your 16 year old is actually doing more than what my son did. My son screamed. He understood everything and was sooo intellectual, but just couldn't speak. I had him watch LeapFrog, Letters and Talking Word Factory. He wasn't interested at first, but then started watching it and watching it. That seemed to help him talk. That may not be the best suggestion though. My youngest of 4, is 20 months old right now. Adjusted age is about almost 18 months old. He doesn't speak either, just babbles. He's a preemie of 2 1/2 months early. Because he was so early, he is part of a program that helps him developmentally. One of the speech therapists gave me a bunch of suggestions. When he picks things up, look at it and call it what it is. For example, he picks up a ball. Look at him with amazement in your face and voice, say "Ball!" Don't keep saying, "What's that, a ball?" The reason being is because it's too many words for them to grasp sometimes, it's foreign. But keep talking to him. When getting him ready, say, "Okay shoes". Hand the shoe to him, then ask for it back. Then give it back to him, then ask for the shoe back. Do the back and forth thing as a game. It's to reinforce what it is, but for him to copy you. Then once you copy him more, he'll think it's fun. Then he'll copy you with what you say. Get a hat, put it on your head. Then put it on his head...do that back and forth. Go get a pan in the kitchen and a wooden spoon. Turn it over and tap on it. Then show him to do it. Then you do it, switch. It's roleplaying, repetitiveness, and copying each other-->plus you're interacting and having fun with your child. I have 4 children, so it doesn't ever get boring! Another suggestion, get his ears checked by his pediatrician. If your pediatrician says his eyes look fine, see if you can ask for a hearing test just to make you more comfortable. My coworker has a daughter that wasn't talking at 18 months. The pedi said her ears looked fine, but they insisted on a hearing test. They got one, and it ended up she had some fluid in her ears that you couldn't really detect or see. So, they put tubes in her ear temporarily and then she started talking. Don't get too wrapped up with concern though because he's only 16 months. All kids have a different pace, but try some of the things above and talk to your pediatrician. By the way, what is an Educational Travel Specialist?

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.F.

answers from San Francisco on

I wanted to say thanks for posting this i am going through the same thing right now! so thank you!

For Updates and Special Promotions
Follow Us

Related Questions

Related Searches