15 answers

Question About My Daughter's Breasts

Wow, if you would have asked me years ago if I'd ever type the above phrase, I would have said you were crazy! Anyway, my daughter is almost 12 years old, very mature and her body has been developing over the last 2-3 years. She is 5'3", weighs about 115 and has had her period regularly for about a year at this point. She has been wearing a bra in one form or another since she was maybe 8. She is now about a size 34 B-C. She has been growing out of her old bras fairly regularly. Hopefully she's done growing in that area for a while at least.
Yesterday, we were in a store trying on bras. I was in the fitting room with her (we're not really sure about what will give her enough support, so she wanted me in there). When she was changing, I noticed that one breast sits up nice and perky and the other one droops a little. They are nearly the same size (nobody is perfect). One nipple pointed straight out and the other was somewhat pointed downward by maybe and inch or so. Has anyone ever heard of this? I didn't make a big deal about it at all, I'm just curious if it will all straighten itself out or should I check with her pediatrician at her next appointment?
Thanks!

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I remember when I was a pre-teen that I read a book that was written like the diary of a 12-year-old girl. She went bra shopping with her friend, and the friend exclaimed that one of the main character's breasts was bigger than the other. The funny thing was then a sales woman from the store pops her head into the fitting room and said, "Did someone say 'breast'?" And then she goes on and discusses how it's perfectly normal for breasts to be asymmetrical.

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I'd find a woman gyn and take her. I would be a little concerned about that. You don't have to tell her that it's unusual to see a doctor for her breasts at this age. She has seen a doctor for all kinds of things. Just make it "no big deal" and tell her that part of becoming a young woman is a breast exam. Women do it all the time, yadda yadda.

Then talk to the doctor in the hallway out of her earshot. That way if there's nothing wrong, she won't worry. If there is, then the doctor will know what to say. And being a woman doctor, she will be much easier on your daughter's psyche.

Good luck,
D.

5 moms found this helpful

I was a bra fitter at Penney's for 3yrs. I recommend getting her a fitting at Penney's. The Penney's bra fitters are just trained better. Since 80% of all women are wearing the wrong size bra, have yourself fitted first in front of your daughter she will feel more secure if she can watch a fitting. Then have the fitter help you to find good fitting bras. Bras are like shoes, just because you wear a size 8 shoe doesn't mean every size 8 will fit you.

It is completely normal to have boobs of different sizes and shapes especially when a girl is just developing or during pregnancy or breastfeeding. There are several different types of pads that you can use in the bra to even them out and always buy the bra that fits the bigger boob.

Good luck and have fun bra shopping. I'm now taking my granddaughters bra shopping cause grandma's the 'expert'. Ahh it's a fun day at the mall with the kids. :-)

3 moms found this helpful

I remember when I was a pre-teen that I read a book that was written like the diary of a 12-year-old girl. She went bra shopping with her friend, and the friend exclaimed that one of the main character's breasts was bigger than the other. The funny thing was then a sales woman from the store pops her head into the fitting room and said, "Did someone say 'breast'?" And then she goes on and discusses how it's perfectly normal for breasts to be asymmetrical.

2 moms found this helpful

Totally normal. I even knew a girl who had one breast about 4 inches bigger than the other. I also would not say anything to your daughter about it and I would not ask her Dr about it in front of her either.

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If you are concerned I would take her to a female gynecologist. As a pre-teen I personally would not have wanted a guy or the usual pediatrician. From what I've heard asymmetry is normal at that age, but who knows if it is when they are developing so fast.

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It's normal for breasts to be asymmetrical. It might be worth privately asking her female dr. about, though I highly doubt it means anything.

Don't say anything to your daughter about it, though. She will probably notice they are different at some point, but at this young age you don't want her to get a complex. Thanks to my cousin pointing out my breasts' flaws at 14, and then my college roommate screaming in horror at them one time, I really hated my chest for a long time. I hadn't noticed my problem until those people were so kind as to point it out to me.

So maybe if the doctor feels it needs to be looked at, she can make it a discreet part of some other exam. I repeat - don't mention it to your daughter.

1 mom found this helpful

i don't really have any advice about the difference between the two breast as far as size I am right there with her. I started getting "boobs" at 10 and was a small c cup by 12 and went to a D cup by the time I was 13. Having large breast sucks(that's my opinion) I am now a 38D or 42 DD depending on the bra/brand. When I was pregnant both times I was a 44DDD or 42E. Sorry I'm not much help with the other issue. but I do agree with asking her PED about it at her next apt. Good luck

1 mom found this helpful

I know each person is different and some women have different sized breasts...

I would bring it up at her next visit...it doesn't sound normal to me - my daughter wasn't a C cup until she was 17....

I wouldn't make a big deal of it...just make a note of it and talk to the pediatrician...maybe call your OB/GYN and tell them what you told us...they may want to see her...who knows!! :)

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