82 answers

Late Walkers Are Smarter???

Last night a friend of mine said that babies that walk later, crawl longer, are smarter than kids who walk early. She said the action of crawling requires a lot more use of the brain and babies are therefore exercising neurological activity a lot more. Basically, that early walkers have greater academic difficulties. She even said studies were done about how early walkers tested poorly on pre-school assessment tests etc. Has anyone ever heard of this?? My daughter was a late walker but my son an early walker. My early walker was what prompted this discussion… BTW, all her kids were late walkers.

What do you all think?

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So What Happened?™

WOW! I received SO many sensational responses! Thank you for setting my mind at ease. My so-called friend has always been competitive, always trying to make others feel insecure by constantly comparing her children to others. This was the last straw! Thank you again all you wonderful Moms!!!!

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Hi- What I have noticed raising two girls and being around tons of other kids in the process is that it seems babies are either more physical or more verbal/intellectual. Imagine trying to do it all at once! The real physical ones who crawl/walk early and are always going somewhere frequently aren't the big talkers. My oldest didn't walk until 14 months but spoke very well at a young age and had a really high vocabulary. She would sit and look at books and could talk with adults in a way more characteristic of a much older child. My youngest was super physical, walked at a much younger age and was always going somewhere or climbing something. She did not speak clearly and was not real verbal until she was older. Now they both talk (a lot) and are great students, read constantly and are very intelligent little girls. Babies have so much to learn and take in. I think the ones who are more inclined towards physical activities focus on those and the thinkers are going to show more gains in verbal and intellectual ways. Beleive me you can't tell much about long term intelligence when they are really young unless they are at a genious level (the super smarties often have problems socially at a young age.) At certain points I was "concerned" the older one wasn't physical enough and other times we thought the little one didn't talk enough. It all shakes out in the end, beware of ideas and people that want to label kids based on blanket generalizations. As long as they hit those milestones within a reasonable range, late or early it's all good!

5 moms found this helpful

I know you have already received a ton of responses, but this is completely BS! My youngest was a 'late walker' and while I love her dearly she's not nesc academically ahead of everyone else. Quite frankly, she struggles...she's in 3rd grade. :)
I'd ask her for a link on this supposed study. I hate 'friends' like this and always enjoy calling them out so everyone else can see how they are too! lol
N.

3 moms found this helpful

Wives tale. 100%

I know PG (profoundly gifted) kids who were early walkers, and those who were late walkers.

I know gifted kids who were early walkers, and those who were late walkers.

Ditto 2e, challenged, slow, & disabled.

As far as PRESCHOOL testing, sheesh. Not even going there.

Correlation is not Causality.

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I don't know the answer to your question but I just wanted to say that sort of conversation would tick me off. Why do moms need to be so competitive with each other? Sounds like this mother was puffing out her chest boosting about her children. Of course, we all think our children are brilliant, beautiful and gifted in their own way. No need to aim your conversation in such a way that could potentially belittle or offend the very people we call friends. Geez! Just a pet peeve of mine!!

But finally, I would love to read any research that can back up her claim rather than the random spouting off of so-called findings.

7 moms found this helpful

Hi- What I have noticed raising two girls and being around tons of other kids in the process is that it seems babies are either more physical or more verbal/intellectual. Imagine trying to do it all at once! The real physical ones who crawl/walk early and are always going somewhere frequently aren't the big talkers. My oldest didn't walk until 14 months but spoke very well at a young age and had a really high vocabulary. She would sit and look at books and could talk with adults in a way more characteristic of a much older child. My youngest was super physical, walked at a much younger age and was always going somewhere or climbing something. She did not speak clearly and was not real verbal until she was older. Now they both talk (a lot) and are great students, read constantly and are very intelligent little girls. Babies have so much to learn and take in. I think the ones who are more inclined towards physical activities focus on those and the thinkers are going to show more gains in verbal and intellectual ways. Beleive me you can't tell much about long term intelligence when they are really young unless they are at a genious level (the super smarties often have problems socially at a young age.) At certain points I was "concerned" the older one wasn't physical enough and other times we thought the little one didn't talk enough. It all shakes out in the end, beware of ideas and people that want to label kids based on blanket generalizations. As long as they hit those milestones within a reasonable range, late or early it's all good!

5 moms found this helpful

My son started walking at 14 months. He was born weighing 9 lbs 1 1/2 oz. At 1 yr old he weighed 25 lbs. I figured since he weighed that much he needed to get a little stronger to support his weight and it took him a little longer to get there. He's 11 yrs old now. Gifted, straight A's, reads at a 12th grade level, tallest in his class, black belt in taekwondo, and his teachers and everyone at school tells me what a witty sense of humor he has and how proud I should be of him (we are very proud of him). I'm not sure I would equate when they begin walking with how bright they turn out to be. I'm sure there must be a lot of factors of nature, nurture, nutrition, environment and just plain luck. We've certainly been very lucky so far.

5 moms found this helpful

Anecdotal evidence does not equal universal truth.

5 moms found this helpful

I'm an educational psychologist with a PhD. Your friend is ridiculous and shame on her for making you question your own child's intelligence.

5 moms found this helpful

My son walked at nine months and his full scale IQ is 134. If that makes him less smart, so be it, LOL. Perhaps your friend (AKA Mother of Smarter Kids... still can't help LOL) should spend some of her infinite wisdom investigating wives' tales.

Or perhaps she can produce the studies she likes to quote?

Buahahaha... ahem. Seriously, she needs to step back and check her insecurities at the door.

4 moms found this helpful

If studies were done, have her cite her sources, otherwise she is FOS. If this were my friend, her credibility would be seriously damaged.
And what's the big deal about having smart kids? I teach special ed. and I would take many of my students over some smart kids any day. We've got to get over the idea that smart is better. There is room in this world for us all, thank you very much.
If your kids are well loved and accepted, they'll succeed.

4 moms found this helpful

Oh good grief, don't get pulled into any of that kind of talk. Our daughter and my husband walked at 6 months.. no kidding Never crawled..Our daughter was speaking in sentences by 10 months. Daughter has always been smart, creative.. blah, blah.. now in an Ivy league college..

I remember relatives freaking out, because I made her walk! I had nothing to do with it. She lifted her head to look at me when I said her name out loud for the first time in the delivery room! I knew we were in for the ride of our lives..

Let kids progress on their own time.
When people tell me that stuff, I just say, "Oh really".

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