42 answers

Toddlers and Dandruff???

My 2 year old seems to have dandruff - does that seem weird to anyone? When I comb her hair, it flakes - not too bad yet, but when I part it I can see her scalp is verrrryy dry and almost scabby looking. She takes a bath daily but I only wet and wash her hair every 3 or 4 days. Any suggestions for a product or homemade concotion?

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

We've been washing her hair daily, and 2x a week with Dandruff shampoo. The doctor has confirmed that she has a mild milk allergy as well as a few othres which might explan her dry skin...we're waiting now to see an allergist! Thanks for all the suggestions!

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I think my 20-mo-old son has that too. I think it's "cradle cap" like baby's get. Is it darker in color than the rest of her scalp? The lady at Kids Cuts says you can use baking soda & vinegar, and a soft toothbrush, and gently rub it off the scalp. I haven't done it yet. I just massage the area when I shampoo him. Anyway, it's worth a try! I guess it's fairly common. Good luck!

My daughter is seven and I have noticed a similar thing. Mostly when I part her hair to put it in pig tails. Anyway, my mother in law told me to rub a little baby oil on it. I put a little on my finger and massaged it into her scalp, so it didn't make her hair oily. My mother in law told me that you can rub it in before bath time and then wash her hair, but I'm not convinced that wouldn't stay oily. How I did it has worked for my daughter.

Contrary to popular belief dandruff is caused by excess oil not by being dry. If you wash her hair more often, it will likely clear up.

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All of my children have had the same problem. It finally got better with my oldest when he started taking showers at 7 yrs old. The best and cheapest solution for me was to rub olive oil in their hair about 1/2 from bath time, brush it with a soft brush and then to wash their hair while the tub is still filling up. Using the soap free water from the faucet to rise the hair.

I had dry scalp when I was young and both my children do. It looks like cradle cap but my children are 9 and 7. I put baby oil on there head and comb it out with a very small comb. This is what my mother did for me and it works very well. Good luck.

I think my 20-mo-old son has that too. I think it's "cradle cap" like baby's get. Is it darker in color than the rest of her scalp? The lady at Kids Cuts says you can use baking soda & vinegar, and a soft toothbrush, and gently rub it off the scalp. I haven't done it yet. I just massage the area when I shampoo him. Anyway, it's worth a try! I guess it's fairly common. Good luck!

My boys get the same thing. I don't even notice it until they are in the sun and I look at their scalps. Then I see gross little yellow scabby patches. I use Head & Shoulders for a few washings and it takes care of it. After I wash and the patches are softer I take a fine comb to loosen them up a bit. It does take more than one washing though. Thank goodness you can't see the stuff without really looking because it is gross.

my son had something like that and we figured out that it was related to his dairy consumption. More dairy products more scalp issues, when we took him off dairy it cleared up in about a week or so. I used a vitamin E oil from the health food store in the mean time to message his scalp and pick off all the scab looking things that were already flaking off... and then washed it out at night.

Olive oil works really well. Rub it in her hair when she is in the bath, then comb it through and rinse. It helps moisturize the scalp, although she'll smell like a salad!

My daughter is seven and I have noticed a similar thing. Mostly when I part her hair to put it in pig tails. Anyway, my mother in law told me to rub a little baby oil on it. I put a little on my finger and massaged it into her scalp, so it didn't make her hair oily. My mother in law told me that you can rub it in before bath time and then wash her hair, but I'm not convinced that wouldn't stay oily. How I did it has worked for my daughter.

That is actually a form of psoriasis or eczema which indicates that your daughter is not getting a balance of nutrition (not enough fresh foods or too much sugars, bread and juice) or her digestive tract cannot process sugars, yeast and mold (aka, sweets, breads and cheese).

Psoriasis/eczema happens with kids that cannot process corn syrup and corn syrup solids and yeast producing foods. These kids should avoid all processed foods that contain corn syrup, fruit juice, and they should eat a diet limited in sweets and yeasted breads.

You can help to correct the imbalance by giving her acidophilus, which is available in a chewable grape form for kids (called "Yum Yum Dophilus". The acidophilus will replace the missing bacteria in her colon so that she can more easily process these foods - however you will still want to restrict them.

You cannot "kill" psoriasis/eczema topically because it grows from the gut out to the skin. If not treated or limited in its growth, it could eventually show up as skin rashes or metal allergies later on. Perhaps she has already had rashes: diaper rash, small milk rashes... these are all from the same source.

You may find some luck with topical, toxic hair products, but this will not eliminate the problem forever ~ it will just put toxins into her body while the yeast/mold find a new way out. Later on she will have vaginal yeast infections, skin rashes and more problems on her head.

My highest recommendation is acidophilus and a restricted diet. Avoid all yeast-producing foods, especially fruit juice and bread. It's really not that hard and she'll be happier and healthier for her lifetime.

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