17 answers

Pregnant at Age 46

I like to know what kind of risk that I have for me and my baby when I am pregnant at age 46.

1 mom found this helpful

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

I don't know the risk at 46, but I had a baby when I was three months shy of 41 and all was great. He was healthy and wonderful and joins his two brothers ages 4 and 6. Good luck! Do the first trimester screen and the ultrasound and blood work and take it easy and I am everything will go fine. Congratulations!

Congratulations! Here's an article I saw this morning that might help. http://living.health.com/2009/05/18/health-risks-mid-life...

Take care!

More Answers

I have a friend that carried and delivered a happy, healthy chunk of a little boy at 46. She was my hero since I'm in the same age range and want to have another baby myself.

You should consider getting yourself a high risk maternal specialist as your OB. I found one with my first pregnancy at 40 and it gave me a lot of comfort knowing that I had a specialist trained in older mother pregnancies in my corner. She used to tease me that at the age of 40 I was one of her "young pup" patients. I'd love to recommend her, but she left her practice to pursue research.

Good luck! Ignore the naysayers and surround yourself with supportive people. Our bodies were meant for bearing babies.

1 mom found this helpful

The older you are, the more chance of having a baby with Down Syndrome. If there are any problems during the pregnancy, your doctor will want to test you for that. My last child, I was 42. I had no complications, except that the pregnancy before that, I had gestational diabeties.

Just talk to your doctor about the questions you have. They should explain everything that could happen.

It's probably too late to do the CVS test but doing the amnio gave me peace of mind that my baby would be healthy AND it did not harm my baby one bit. It's extremely rare that it would if you have a doctor who has lots of experience performing amnio's...those were my doctors words. It's a statistical fact that older women have a higher chance of having babies with downs syndrome but that doesn't mean it will happen to you. My friend who's 42 just had a perfectly healthy baby.

As others have said, yes, at 46, you are high risk for genetic or maternal issues with your pregnancy, and you must be under the care of an OB with high risk experience. Because all the risk translates into the outcome for your child at birth and potentially later on. Nothing can happen and anything can happen. Some doctors recommend reading The Premature Baby Book. It is scary as hell, but prepares you to do everything you are directed to do to protect the life and health of your baby.
I was 43 when I was surprised to discover I was pregnant for the first time. I had an amnio at 17 weeks (and if you want one you need to do it asap) because it was important for me to know if my baby was OK genetically (she was.) My pregnancy was a piece of cake for the first 5 months. I worked fulltime and traveled extensively, including 2 weeks walking around Europe. Then I thought I had a stomache ache one day and called the doctor, who sent me immediately to the hospital. It was pre-term labor; I was already having contractions. The next 2 months were bedrest at home and mostly in the hospital as they worked to find a drug regimen that would minimize the contractions and not make me loopy or agitated. Despite all the precautions, as soon as the baby turned vertex, the contractions increased, my water broke and my baby was born... 2 months early. (Lesson learned here, be your own advocate, make sure the doctor -- not the nurse or the resident -- is aware of everything going on.) My daughter spent the next 3 months in the NICU, with one of those diseases in the book, and had 4 major surgeries by the age of 1. Thank God she has been fine since then (she is 17 now) and minimal residual effects.
Don't take chances. It is your child's life.
I wish you a delightful and easy pregnancy and birth.

Congratulations! Here's an article I saw this morning that might help. http://living.health.com/2009/05/18/health-risks-mid-life...

Take care!

I don't know the risk at 46, but I had a baby when I was three months shy of 41 and all was great. He was healthy and wonderful and joins his two brothers ages 4 and 6. Good luck! Do the first trimester screen and the ultrasound and blood work and take it easy and I am everything will go fine. Congratulations!

I was 42 when I was pregnant.Thank God I had a heathy baby boy. I would not take the amniocentesis test, because for me I would have my baby no matter what. The doctor told me the amniocentesis could cause a miscarriage. Even a little chance of having a miscarriage was to much for me. I had 4 before. Do not worry take care of you and baby. Congratulations!!!!!! Relax and enjoy. Do you know if baby is a boy or girl?
Sue

Hi Anne,
Congratulations! Anyone over the age of 40 and pregnant gets put in the "high risk" category. It just means that they are going to monitor your pregnancy more closely.
It means that statistically you are at an increased risk of several age-specific complications. These can include miscarriage, fetal distress, low birthweight (of the baby), Down Syndrome in your child, high blood pressure (throughout your pregnancy) and gestational diabetes, and placenta previa and more likely to have a c-section. Some of those complications are quite treatable. Most woman 35 to over 40 have healthy pregnancies. Keep your habits healthy to help reduce certain risks. Be sure to eat a healthy diet and moderately exercise and be sure to get prenatal care.
Again congratulations!
Linda

1 / 3
Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.