27 answers

Getting Rid of the Pacifier - Lenexa, KS

Hi! My 10 month-old has been using a pacifier since he was 3 months old. We used to give it to him fairly often but now have gotten it down to only naps and bedtime. He has been teething for what seems like forever (he already has 8 teeth) and the pacifier really helps when he's cutting a tooth. When this happens, I will give him the pacifier more often. My concern is that he will be too dependent on it. I really don't want him to use it past his first birthday, but I don't know if it is a battle that is worth fighting. I have 2 questions about this:
1. What are some ways we can encourage him to stop using the pacifier, especially at sleep times? (He has a little animal he sleeps with and he is not nursing).
2. Should I be concerned about getting rid of the pacifier at nap times and sleep times by or around his first birthday? Am I being too rigid?

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

Thank you all for the great advice! After reading all the responses I realize that I do need to relax a bit about the whole pacifier thing. It is helpful to hear from experienced moms that it will work itself out as he gets older. That perspective is not always easy for me to come by. For now we will keep having him use it for sleeping times and if he needs it when he's teething. I need to chill out I guess! :) It's funny that as a mom (so far) I think I have all these grand plans for how things should go. I should know better that babies don't go by the book and that is humbling to me. When the time is right for CJ, we will use some of the great tips you all gave. Thank you again for your advice and helpful hints.

Featured Answers

Hi K.,

I agree with the other women in that this is a personal decision - there's no "right" time or exact time to get rid of it. I just wanted to share what we did - which was an idea I got from posting the question on here a couple of years ago! When my daughter was understanding how to throw things away and that some things break (a little after 1, I think or around that time) we cut a slit into her binkie. She sucked on it and found that it wasn't working anymore. We said, "Oh, it must be broken - Oh well!" nice and cheery... She threw it away herself. It worked for us. Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

I had a friend of mine gather up ALL of the pacifiers, tie them to helium balloons and take them out into a field and let them go with ther son. She had told him the pacifier fairy needed them back for other little boys and girls, and he never fussed again.
Odd but true!

the more attached to the binky they are the harder it is to get them off of it! I had it down to sleep times too at 10 months then I got it just down to bed time. now she is 15 months and is fine without it. I recomend giving him a teething ring in place of a binky. or any type of teething toy. this worked great with my daughter. I wanted her off the binky cause her cousin who is now three still uses them at times and chews off the nipples. plus it is easier to break them of a habit when they are younger cause their attention spans are shorter. Eventually they will forget about it and fixate on something else.(glowworm for instance)

More Answers

Hi K.,

Honestly, if he is using already the pacifier, and he feels comfortable with it, and he needs it, I don't see the reason to get rid of it so soon. It is a very personal point of view, and depends on how your baby reacts and what you want. My older kid stopped using the pacifier at three, and I did it "cold turkey", he almost did not realize about the paci missing, but with the little one is taking a little bit longer; he is now three and he still use it for naps and bedtime. However, soon the pacifier is going to be lost......I have been telling him that he is already a big boy, and he can have his blanket and his teddy bear to help him fall asleep.
Your little one is just too little I think. When kids are older, yes, it might take time to get rid of this binky, but it works, but when they are babies or younger, it just going to make them cry more, and you will have less rest. There is time for everything. You will have good suggestions here.
A.

2 moms found this helpful

Hi there!
Well, there are no real "right" answers on this one...I think it's a personal decision and I'm just going with what feels right to me right now. I don't have any advice, but this is what we're doing.
My daughter is almost 2 and I SWORE she'd be off her bottles and pacifier by 1...well, 1 came and went...her bottles ended at about 15 months, but she loves her "bink" and uses it only at naps and bedtime (we have her throw her binks in her bed before she leaves her room). I've come to the conclusion that I'm in no rush to get rid of them. She doesn't use them during the day...so no issues with speech...she's a chatterbox...she only uses it to fall alseep and plays with the "extras" in the early morning hours. She's such a good sleeper now! I'm currently preggers with #2 and the first trimester exhaustion is wearing me down...so if it takes a bink in the crib to help her sleep an extra hour here or there...therefore letting me sleep an extra hour here or there...then it's worth it.
Haven't quite decided when we'll actually get rid of them completely...for now, a peaceful night is priceless...
and my old pediatrician was of the thought that no-one takes a pacifier to college...so...that eased my mind.
P.S. I still sleep with my "baby pillow" from childhood...just in a travel pillow case...hey...whatever works!

2 moms found this helpful

I may be different than everyone else, but I think it's called a pacifier for a reason. I tried to wean my oldest off the pacifier too soon b/c she went right for the thumb, which is REALLLLy a difficult habit to break. With my youngest 2, (they are 2) we slowly weaned them off and they don't use them at all during the day. Every so often they will ask for one at bedtime, but we don't have them anymore so the thought of using them passess. I say let your child use it as you try to figure out what else can be of comfort to him.

2 moms found this helpful

relax...when your child starts throwing the pacifier rather than sucking on it...you'll know it's time! For some children, this comes early....for others, it can take years.
We chose to eliminate the pacifier between the 1st & 2nd years. Once they're up & walking, we just felt that the boys were capable of self-soothing without the binky.

That said, for my daycare kids, the story has been pretty much the same. Consistently, what I'm seeing is that if the pacifier is used regularly in the 1st few months, then elimination does not come until well after 1 1/2 years. I can only think of one child who gave it up before 1 year.....& only 1 other child who went without from day one. & that's in 22 years of working with children!

My only concern stems from children using the pacifier beyond the 1st year or two. I have seen several children allowed to use the bink thru preschool years....age 3-4! In most of the cases, there are distinct developmental differences in the positioning of their front teeth. When these older children are allowed to use the pacifier, their front teeth actually begin to cant out....seriously, you can see it at a glance! It's like a picket fence leaning over....not a good thing.

So, relax for these first years....& save the battle for when your child has developed better self-soothing skills.

2 moms found this helpful

Hi K.,

I agree with the other women in that this is a personal decision - there's no "right" time or exact time to get rid of it. I just wanted to share what we did - which was an idea I got from posting the question on here a couple of years ago! When my daughter was understanding how to throw things away and that some things break (a little after 1, I think or around that time) we cut a slit into her binkie. She sucked on it and found that it wasn't working anymore. We said, "Oh, it must be broken - Oh well!" nice and cheery... She threw it away herself. It worked for us. Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

i dont know about any one else, but my son had acid reflux when he was a baby and when he was hurting, the binky helped to soothe him. We let him have it until he was 2 and then when i was about ready to have him give it up, his dad left us and that was pretty tramatic for him and hw clung to it even harder. so long story short, when he was three, i gathered all of the binkies in the house and we had a bye bye binky party (similar to birthday party with out the presents for him)and wrapped up all of these used and chewed on binkies in a nice box with pretty wrapping that he helped to wrap up and gave them to a friend of mine who was pregnant "for her baby, becasue he was not a baby any more and her baby needed it them." he got really excited abotu that. It took about a week for him to not ask for the binky any more (instead of sucking on the binky at night he started to talk alot lol)anyhow, i think that if u want to wait until ur child is a little older to have them give up teh binky, it would be just fine.

1 mom found this helpful

my boys pretty much weaned themselves from it. The oldest was 3 months but his was a one of a kind and wasn't safe to use anymore so we couldn't find another one and he didn't like any other type so he fussed a few nights but was done with it but was nothing we could do about that one. No stores had the one he was using anymore and haven't seen one like it since. Think it was one of the recalled ones and can see why.
middle child had colic for 5 1/2 months so she had hers for 9 months but wanted her weaned from it before a year and she only fussed 1 night and was over it.

youngest son weaned himself from it at around 4 months. He wasn't using it much anymore and would find it on the floor or in his crib so we just took it one night and he didn't care at all. He also weaned himself from the bottle before he was a year old. He kept throwing it out of his crib and they kept cracking/yes even the plastic ones would crack so told him if he throws another one out of his crib then that was the last one and he threw it and didn't fuss for it at all so that was the end of the bottle.
I started all my kids using sippy cups at 4 months old to get them used to using one. We started with the type that leaked so they could get the swallowing thing down and they got about an ounce in their cup during feeding times in the high chair, then when they started eating food they knew how to use the cup on their own. You can put their breastmilk/formula in it to begin with. After a few weeks they learned to suck on it and could use the dripless kind so by the time it was time to take their bottle away they were just as content to have the sippy cup because it wasn't something new to replace their bottle, they were used to using it already.

1 mom found this helpful

I'll be honest, I felt the same way at first, but realized it was her source of comfort so I let her have it when she wanted it - primarily when upset, napping or in the car. She just turned two and that's when I took it. I think since we didn't make it a major issue, she didn't either. I simply cut off of the tip and she noticed and said, "it's broken mommy." I just said that's a bummer. When she asked me to fix it, I "tried", but then explained how mommy would always do her best to fix things for her, but there would be times in life mommy wouldn't be able to. But I love her the same and can offer lots of hugs and kisses. To may amazement and to those around me, it has NOT BEEN AN ISSUE AT ALL!!! It's been so awesome and I'm very glad I let her have it as long as she needed it. I think you have to decide what you're comfortable with, but there is not rule that says you have to get rid of it at 1. He finds comfort in it, let him have that comfort.

1 mom found this helpful

1 / 3
Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.