12 answers

Feeding Baby Jarred Applesauce

I'd like to give my newly solid food eating baby (4 months) regular jarred applesauce instead of baby applesauce. The ingredients are organic apples and water. My question is, should I put the applesauce in a blender to smooth it out? How long does it stay good in the fridge? Should I freeze it (I've heard ice cube trays work well)?

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So What Happened?™

Thank you everybody for your advice and concern. My pediatrician told me to go ahead and start on solids. She went from drinking 6 oz of formula to about 2-3 oz at a sitting. I think it hurts her stomach. She absolutely loves cereal and fruits and she's still drinking formula primarily, just in small doses at frequent intervals. I have to say, since starting solids, she's had much less gas and stomach pain, and she's starting sleeping 8 hours straight through.

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I agree with the others - on all parts I think. 4 months is definitely on the young side even with a full-term baby. I exclusively breastfed both of mine until 6 months and then we started on cereal followed by fruits & veggies. In terms of using only babyfood - some of them definitely had way more ingredients than I was interested (mostly as they get to the older foods) in giving my child. Plus some of the babyfoods just don't seem to remotely smell or taste like the actual food - bananas and peaches stand out. My family is also vegetarian so we don't have too many choices once they start doing the little meals. So I primarily made my own babyfood. It's REALLY simple and I did freeze it in the ice trays which works really well. Once frozen, I transferred the food cubes to zippy bags and had them all labeled. Another bonus was being able to offer even more variety. For example mine loved avacado. Babies need plenty of fat for brain development and avacados are full of the super healthy variety. But you can't find it on the baby food shelves.

1 mom found this helpful

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Did your pediatrician recommend you start solids so early? It is now generally agreed upon that 6 months is when you should start these. Starting foods too early makes it more likely for your child to develop allergies.

2 moms found this helpful

P.,

As a first foods option, pear is a much better choice than apple. You can puree the pear and freeze it in the ice cube trays and defrost a cube at a time for feeding.

I'm not sure if you're formula feeding or breastmilk feeding, but you should absolutely consider waiting until at least 6-8 months (the longer the better) before introducing solids. Is there a reason you feel you need to start him/her on other foods now? If so, there are far better options to consider besides apple sauce or even pears for that matter.

I'd be happy to provide you with some information, if you'd like.

Blessings,

Rolinda
Wife, Mother, Friend

1 mom found this helpful

I agree with the others - on all parts I think. 4 months is definitely on the young side even with a full-term baby. I exclusively breastfed both of mine until 6 months and then we started on cereal followed by fruits & veggies. In terms of using only babyfood - some of them definitely had way more ingredients than I was interested (mostly as they get to the older foods) in giving my child. Plus some of the babyfoods just don't seem to remotely smell or taste like the actual food - bananas and peaches stand out. My family is also vegetarian so we don't have too many choices once they start doing the little meals. So I primarily made my own babyfood. It's REALLY simple and I did freeze it in the ice trays which works really well. Once frozen, I transferred the food cubes to zippy bags and had them all labeled. Another bonus was being able to offer even more variety. For example mine loved avacado. Babies need plenty of fat for brain development and avacados are full of the super healthy variety. But you can't find it on the baby food shelves.

1 mom found this helpful

When i started my daughter on fruits and vegetables at six months, i made a lot of the food myself with a food processor. however the apple sauce i bought in the large jars. i didn't use the baby applesauce. i just made sure that it wasn't chunky style and that there was no sugar added. I think that the baby applesauce might have some added nutrients, but at this point most of her nutrition should still be coming from formula or breast milk. i would consult with her pediatrician since she was a preemie and is still on the young side for starting solids.
applesauce freezes well in ice cube trays and then you can store the cubes in a ziploc bag or plastic container.

I did this with my daughter. I used the Mott's organic. I fed it to her as is. The reason she liked it more was because of the texture. It did go bad pretty fast in the fridge, compared to other jarred foods I've bought. The general rule is to use it within three days of opening (baby food is 2-3 days, and other food is 3-5 days). I would imagine you could freeze it. i with I would have thought of doing that.

applesauce does go bad fast i always would by those little self serve cups of the applesause but i also have two other kids and they all love it i can take one of those servings and feed my five month old and my 3 year old and since you don't open them they can last longer....i never heard of freezing applesauce so i don't know about that.

Hi P.,
Check with your baby's doctor before starting any new foods. She is very young to be jumping in to sold foods and being a preemie you may have to wait a bit longer than a full term baby. Be on the safe side and check with her doctor first.
T.

It's usually recommended that preemies wait until at least 6 months adjusted age for solids, if not later. The intestinal walls are still very open in young babies, leaving them vulnerable to food allergies. Signs that a baby is ready for solids include: to be able to sit up unassisted, lose the tongue-thrust reflex, have at least 1 tooth, and show an interest in food. Ideally babies should self-feed, rather than be spoon fed by someone. That lets them set the pace and learn how to interact with the food.

No reason to use the little baby jars instead of regular adult applesauce. Applesauce does go off pretty quick when you open it so I'd do the ice cube tray thing. I've done cubes of various things, cooked chopped veggies, meat, etc. It's very convenient, healthy, and cost effective! Baby jars are such a waste, and once you get into the older more complex foods they're loaded with chemicals and sugar and other junk. Check out the bookstore or library for books about starting solids and making homemade baby food. There's lots of good info out there.

As far as the texture goes, see what she likes. The regular texture of applesauce should be fine for a baby old enough to be eating solids. Textures are an important part of learning to eat. :)

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