15 answers

Best Educational Toy for a 2 1/2 Year Old?

What is the best educational toy for a 2 1/2 year old? Are those Leap Frog toys worth the money?

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

My Daughter is now 5 and has always loved the Leap frog things she has had. She has been reading and writing (loves too) for about 7 months. She loved the talking word factory dvds, all the educational toys. they are well worth the investment! And they last for years.

More Answers

You! =-) combined with play-doh, finger paints and block puzzles (numbers, shapes, letters). When I played with my kids I had just as much finger paint & play-doh on me as they did! I wasn’t only totally involved but I was supervising 100% of the time. Plus both my kids LOVED their play kitchens. You can buy everything to go with it. Food, plates, cups, pot, pans, etc. Melissa & Doug have a lot of great play food. Besides a lot of the stuff they can use you already have at home…spoons, Tupperware, measuring cups, etc. Save your food boxes (oatmeal, rice, etc), clean them out and let your kids use them for pretend food. My kids didn't have all a lot of fancy toys & games...a few simple toys plus the great outdoors and they were happy. HAVE FUN!!!!!

1 mom found this helpful

they are..my kids loved them. also go to mindware.com they have great stuff!

1 mom found this helpful

The short answers are: 1) None; 2) No. Two and half year olds do not need "educational" toys, and, arguably, older kids don't either. It's the play itself that they learn from. Two year olds need to examine it (whatever "it" may be), chew on it, finger it, bang it, throw it on the floor, drag it around the house, feed it to the dog, etc. etc. If you watch kids, they have the most fun of all (and are learning the most) when they play with ordinary household items. Turn a 2 year old loose in the cabinet where you keep your pots and pans, and he will be totally occupied for hours (if you can stand it!) Let a two year old run wild in the yard with a hose, and he will be in mud heaven. Give a two year old paper and finger paints, put him down on a tarp, and let him go to town. (You do have to supervise more closely with paints!)

1 mom found this helpful

My pediatrician and parents as teachers educator both said anything that encourages their imagination- a kitchen, tea set, doctor kit, work bench, etc.

You need to look for open ended, durable toys. Blocks, cars, etc. You can also visit my website www.discoverytoyslink.com/gsnyder
Everything Discovery Toys sells is educational and has a lifetime guarantee. We also do home parties and catalog shows if you are interested.

My 2 year old loves the Fridge Phonics. We had gotten it for our 4 yr old for her bday and now both kids know their letters and letter sounds. We never pushed them to play with it, they did it on their own.

I have four children and from ages 1-12, the best toy that we buy over and over is the MagnaDoodle. Each of my children have great fine motor skills, learned their alphabets, shapes and just scribbled for hours. The older kids use it all the time for so many things I can't even begin to tell you. It is the best $10 toy ever!!

I think the leap Frog toys are totally worth it, but you can get them used on CL or at rummage sales. The Leap Frog Fridge Phonics taught my 2 year old the alphabet in under a month - sometimes kids learn better from toys than from moms. Love the musical caterpillar too. My older son played with the Leap Frog steering wheel every single day from 10 months old until around 3 1/2; my younger one is not really into that one. The Fridge Farm is cute and funny. I love the fridge toys since they can play in the kitchen while you make dinner.

I also agree with everything else said except about the Leap Frog toys.

Oh!! Little People Town. Not sure the exact name, but it's a fold-able learning town. My 4 year old and 1 year old play with it side by side. Also, the Little People A to Z zoo is great.

Also, the Melissa and Doug toys. The puzzles, cutting food, everything they make is awesome!

1 / 3
Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.