11 answers

3 Week Old Spitting up Constantly

Help! My son is 3 weeks old today and he is exclusively breastfed. The last week he has been spitting up constantly. Sometimes he spit up more than others but it seems like it never stops. Is it something that I am eating? Could he be allergic to my milk? Is he eating too much??? He nurses on both sides for 8 to 10 minutes about every 3 hours. No one in my family has breastfed before so they have no answers for me and my other 2 children never spit up at all. Am I freaking myself out or is there something wrong?
HELP!

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

J.:

you should contact a lactation consultant... spitting up can be from any number of things from eating too much to reflux... without someone seeing you, taking a history and watching a feed there is no way to tell.

P., RLC, IBCLC
Pres. Lactation Support Group, Inc
www.lactationsupportgroup.com

More Answers

I know how alarming it can be to watch your tiny baby seem to spit up non-stop, and at times spit up what appears to be a gallon of breast milk. Yes, I am exaggerating but my daughter spit up constantly and it always appeared to be so much liquid I would be beside myself. I exclusively breast fed my daughter as well, on demand, and from only one working side. I had all the same worries, does she have reflux, is she allergic, is she eating too much, is she getting nourishment since it's always coming out of her. I was assured it was a normal thing. She spit up whether she nursed for a short time, or nursed for longer stretches. She spit up sometimes immediately, and other times an hour or two later. It was just part of the feeding process, and of course, the tidal wave of spit up always came right after I changed into a clean shirt. :) I did ask my pediatrician, and they had said as long as it wasn't projectile (like flew 3 feet across the room), and was more like vomiting that I had nothing to worry about. I would honestly ask your pediatrician at your next well baby visit, and just have them put your mind at ease.

My daughter had the same problem - and after a few days of zantac I couldn't bear giving her I tried the following.

Try eliminating ALL dairy from your diet for 24 hours and see if it stops. If it does try eating a dairy at breakfast and see if it happens again around dinner time. If so he is lactose intolerant - so don't stop breast feeding just don't eat any dairy or if you do take Lactaid which worked for me and my daughter. But it was a long year without dairy. But well worth it. My daughter grew out of it at age 1 and drink milk everyday with no problems.

Also always try to change the diaper before you feed instead of afterward (if you can) that will help the food digest some before he is laid flat on his back and jostled around for the change.

Keep the baby upright as much as possible - I had my daughter sleep in her car carrier in her crib (0r between me an my husband) so that she was propped up more = or have the baby sleep in the swing in your room too. Anything to keep the head about the stomach helps.

The other problem you will have is switching to formula or using formula with cereal - the only one that my daughter tolerated was Nestle good Start - try that before any of that really expensive formula.

Good luck

Spitting up is usually nothing to worry about. I would say most babies BF or formula fed will spit up. It is b/c the valve at the base of the esoughagus and stomach isn't done developing. As the baby gets older the spitting should decrease and for the most part be done by one year. My two girls were projectile spitters and my son likes to keep it in his mouth. Both are gross. My second daughter did have reflux, so just keep your doc informed with what is going on. Good luck and enjoy the stink of spit up!

been there done that. Relax - it's common!

My child spit up, both on breast milk and formula. He's what doctors call a 'happy spitter'. The spitting up never bothers him, in fact he enjoys spitting up then immediately sticking his hands in it - gross huh? After consulting our pediatrician, we try to burp him really well and keep him upright for at least 45 mins after a feeding (note, he NEVER spits up from his bottle just before bed!). At 3 weeks I imagine he likely isn't moving around too much - just try to keep him upright after the feeding. Many times babies (both breastfed and formula fed) spit up because their digestive system is still immature. He'll likely grow out of it, but if you're concerned have your ped check.

Some babies are just spitters. My daughter was one of them. I couldn't believe how much came out of that tiny little body. The good news is that as long as they are gaining weight and don't seem to be in pain, there isn't a problem. The bad news? He might still be spitting up when you start solids. You think it's bad now? wait until it's orange!

J.,

Please don't be worried. I have a son who was exclusively breastfed and I had the same problem with him. It is not that he is eating too much or anything or allergic to your milk. Boys tend to spit up more than girls do. Also it may look like a massive amount of spit up but it isn't as much as you think it is. You might want to ask your doc if he has reflux problems...some babies have a problem with it. But don't worry, honestly, my son grew out of the spit up phase when he was 6 months or so. I hope this helps!!

---D.

It could be a few things. He may be reacting to foods that you are eating. Try and keep note if you notice a pattern. He could just be a spitter-upper. I thought the same of my son but then after his spit-up sessions continued and continued we determined it was more of reflux. Make sure you get a good burp out of him and keep him sitting up or at least inclined for at least 15-20 minutes or more after he eats. If he is having plenty of #1/#2 diapers, then he is still getting what he needs but if you notice a change in that area... definitely call your pediatrician. Good luck!

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