38 answers

Infant Reflux - Austin,TX

My four month old son spits up all the time, i've taken him to the dr's office, even specialist can't tell me nothing.......arggggg.....someone please tell me whatelse i can do...the dr told me he is to young for medicines and i'm freaking out.....my baby has suffer enough......:(

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My son was put on prevacid for his reflux when he was 5 days old. It helped....but putting him on the Similac AR formula (that has rice starch added) is what finally got the reflux under control. He was almost 7 months before he quit spitting up altogether, but the thicker formula helped from the very beginning. Good luck!!!!

Give 1/4 tsp to 1/2 tsp of Mylanta between meals. After each feeding, put him in an upright position for 30 minutes (car seat, swing, bouncy seat, etc.). *not straight up or leaning over, angled slightly back as he would be in a bouncy seat/45 degrees* Do not carry him around right after feeding and do not lay him flat. Sleeping on his side works best at night. Some spit up is inevitable, but this will help minimize it. My daughter saw the specialists, had the tests done (probe down her throat), etc. and in the end...this is what we were told to do and worked as well as the prescriptions, etc.

Have you tried a lactose free formula and maybe a playtex bottle with the throw away liners, definitely make him take breaks every 2ozs, maybe even mix a little rice cereal with the formula.

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My daughter was the same way, and the doctors said that it was fine because she wasnt losing weight. She would spit up almost her whole feeding EVERYTIME we fed her. So we had lots of clothes changes for her and whoever was feeding her. She was about 5-6 months old when she stopped spitting up. I know this wasnt much help, I just wanted to say "I know the feeling" Good luck with the little one!

Have you tried a lactose free formula and maybe a playtex bottle with the throw away liners, definitely make him take breaks every 2ozs, maybe even mix a little rice cereal with the formula.

find a new pedi... they put my son on reflux meds at 6 weeks so your isn't too young

Baby Bliss Gripe Water! My son was born at 27 weeks and had reflux - he spit up all the time, several times a day and they gave him two different medicines to take. Neither really helped much. Then I met a nurse who told me about the gripe water and she said just put it in his first bottle of the day. And oddly enough it worked like a charm. It's a natural product. My son is now 7 and healthy and fabulous. I have recommended this to a lot of mothers and they have all said the same thing, it really works. Good luck.

no baby is too young.
Go with your gut instincts. Trust yourself as a mommy.
Both my kids had relflux. MY dr didn;t want to give it an dhe finally did when I threatened to leave and go to another DR.
Stick to your guns on this.

Both my kids screamed in pain 12 + hrs per day. I was crazy as the screaming wears you down when you have done everything you can. My first one was on Zantac with no help. We then added prevacid, bethanochol, and reglan. She was on those for about 3 weeks with very little relief. We played around with my diet etc with no relief. Finally at 9 weeks of age she underwent an endoscopy. We found that she had a high eosinophil level when they biopsied which indicated a severe allercic process. Basically, she to start on Neocate formula which is like buying gold. Despite this she still had alot if discomfort. My advice to you is to ask your doc for prevacid solutabs. My little girl was about 3-4 weeks and on many meds. She is extremely intelligent and had no Ill effects from them. Prevacid helps many kids. Not mine though. Also, Dr Browns bottles might help.
I know you feel helpless and exhausted. If this is reflux, there is an end in sight. It diesvget better you just have to get through the hours. People who have not experienced this have no idea how awful it can be. I would also suggest you look online. I know there is a support group I think it is reflux.org . Feel free to contact me if you want to talk about more. I would be happy to help you
with suggestions or just listen. Good luck.
M.

(I've actually never responded to anyone's questions, so I hope this comes out okay...)

I know it is difficult. All of my 4 kids spit-up and one more than others--she didn't ever burp well enough, so our pediatrician showed us how to sit her on her bottom and gently rock her back and forth after feedings until she gave a good burp (kind of like helping her with sit-ups). Stopping occassionally to just rub her back in circles... Worked like a charm for her...

Here's a part to an article I found that may also help:

References
Hobbie, C., Baker, S., & Bayerl, C. (2000, 2000 Jan-Feb). Parental understanding of basic infant nutrition: misinformed feeding choices. Journal of Pediatric Healthcare, 14(1), 26-31. Retrieved September 6, 2009, from CINAHL database.

Normal spitting up
Spitting up or mild reflux is very common in infants. Twenty-nine percent of mothers surveyed believed that the most common cause of frequent spitting up was a milk allergy, and 37% did not know or did not answer the question. If a baby is gaining weight well, does not have recurrent pneumonia, has no blood in the stool, and does not appear to be in pain while eating, no intervention is necessary. Health care providers can reassure parents that spitting up is normal and that most babies outgrow it by approximately 1 year of age. About half of normal 2-month-olds spit up twice a day or more. This incidence decreases dramatically after children learn to sit up. At 1 year of age, only 1% of infants continue to spit up (Balistreri & Farrell, 1983). A small percentage of babies will have more serious reflux that may cause failure to thrive, aspiration pneumonia, blood loss, or pain with eating. Some babies arch their backs and cry out. Infants who are spitting up and demonstrate any of these symptoms should be evaluated by a pediatrician or gastroenterologist (Colletti et al., 1995). Even when spitting up is normal, it is a frustrating and messy problem for parents, and health care providers need to acknowledge parents' frustration and give them whatever tips they can to help minimize the problem. Some interventions that might help include making sure the infant burps well, handling the baby very gently after feedings, giving smaller, more frequent feedings, putting a folded blanket under the head of the mattress in the baby's bed to elevate it approximately 30 degrees, and thickening the formula with a small amount of rice cereal. Weaning breast-fed infants who have a tendency to spit up is not necessary. Putting the baby in an infant seat where the stomach is compressed is not beneficial (Balistreri & Farrell, 1983). These suggestions will help the parents feel that they are doing something to comfort the baby.

When an infant spits up frequently, the temptation is great for parents and health care professionals to switch from breast-feeding to bottle-feeding or from one type of formula to another. However, it is important not to discontinue breast-feeding or switch formulas. Unnecessary changes are often made to more expensive formulas or to low-iron formula. The unfounded perception of ill health can also cause increased maternal anxiety and contribute to an adverse attitude in the mother toward the child (vulnerable child syndrome). This attitude on the part of the mother can persist as the child grows older (Forsyth, McCarthy, & Leventhal, 1985).

Give 1/4 tsp to 1/2 tsp of Mylanta between meals. After each feeding, put him in an upright position for 30 minutes (car seat, swing, bouncy seat, etc.). *not straight up or leaning over, angled slightly back as he would be in a bouncy seat/45 degrees* Do not carry him around right after feeding and do not lay him flat. Sleeping on his side works best at night. Some spit up is inevitable, but this will help minimize it. My daughter saw the specialists, had the tests done (probe down her throat), etc. and in the end...this is what we were told to do and worked as well as the prescriptions, etc.

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