25 answers

How Many Words/sentances Should a 2-Year Old Be Speaking?

My son will be 23 months old in just a few weeks. Today, his Dr stated that if he is not speaking more words by his 2nd year appointment - that he will recommend a hearing test and possibly some speech training. (How much difference can 6-weeks make, really?) Neither of us believe there is anything wrong with his hearing, we have plenty of experiences where we know he can hear and understand what is being said. Allbeit, there have been times of stubbornness where he has intentionally ignored us. :-)

My son understands LOTS of words and complete sentances. I can hand him something and tell him to go put it in his room or give it to daddy and he will. He can say some words, (ma-ma, da-da, ba-ba, ball and a few others) but he would prefer to either get whatever he wants (without asking for it) or if he doesn't know the word, he points and we will tell him what it is and say the word about 3 or 4 times for him. *Surprisingly enough, "No!" isn't one of the words we expected him to know and say at this age. LOL *

Maybe I'm just over-reacting? I've read TONS of posts that all say "boys are slower than girls when it comes to talking, and "He'll speak when he's ready" and the like.

How do I know when there is truly an issue and to be concerned?

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

50 words that don't include family members or pets names. and they should be able to say "want drink" so like two-word phrases...that said...at 24 months other than family and pets dd could say no, yes, want, dink(drink), ice, light and bite. about 6-8 weeks later I made her mad because I had a sprite and she wanted it, all she kept saying was "want dink" and I kept saying not now as we were in the car. She got really upset started crying and then stopped crying when I got the gas station...said "mommy, want dink, NOW" I said--well, that's talking more--if you'll talk for it, you can have it...she's never shut up since. LOL!

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My Grandson will be nine in a few weeks and he has been diagnosed with Speech Apraxia but not until he was in 1st grade in school. He was checked for hearing (but that was about all we could get the Drs to do early on) because his hearing was ok they didn't think it necessary to go farther. When he did try to talk it came out as gobbledy gook, another Grandson who was a few years older than him asked me what language he was speaking. When he was in first grade we finally got his diagnosis and treatment was then started. He made rapid progress and we are so releaved, but if we could have had the diagnosis sooner he would have been much further along. He would have been elligible for help as young as 2 or 3 and might not have been as bad or have required to still be in speech therapy at nearly 9.
This affects all their language skills, reading, writing, the way words are used as well as the context they are used and the speech itself.
I know this is long and involved, but I'm telling you this to make a point. If you have a Dr who is smart enough to realize there might be a problem and willing to have him tested then by all means let him if they find a problem the sooner he has speech therapy and other help the quicker there can be progress and if they don't find anything the sooner your mind can rest easy.
Believe me this is a the sooner the better type of thing. Also there is State and Federal help available in most states for the extra expenses involved in the treatment so that shouldn't be a worry.
Because of the delay in getting help for my Grandson he still has a bit of trouble with anything to do with speech and language and spelling. He's a real whiz in math and science and anything to do with imagination and his speech has improved till you can understand him very well unless he gets excited and then you have to tell him slow down and repeat it.
So, please let them test your son, the sooner the better and good luck and God Bless.

2 moms found this helpful

I have two experiences I can share with you.

I had 90 percent hearing loss as a child. My mother thought I was stubborn, so did the doctor - because I could understand everything everyone said to me. This went on until I was about 5 years old. I was reading lips !!!! I still have a talent for doing so, but tubes fixed my hearing and I hear fine now.

My little boy, now 4, wasn't talking a lot at two. He had a lot of ear infections at that age - at least once a month. We got tubes in his ears, went through speech therapy and hearing tests, etc... He is now doing great !! I would do the hearing tests, and speech therapy all over again.

But, there is really no way to tell unless you get him tested - it is just the best thing to do.

1 mom found this helpful

This seems like the same exact story as my son. Last year during his 2 yr old check up we went through this. He was only saying maybe 5 words. We were not sure what to do but just to be safe, we went through the testing. His hearing was fine but his speech was delayed. (So the Dr. said) We started with speech therapy and I would do it again. Within just 1 month, he was saying more words! He now is saying so much I couldn't even count. He will turn 3 this summer. I would for sure have him checked out. If you don't and there was a problem, you'll never forgive yourself for brushing it under the rug or thinking nothing was wrong. I think we were just doing some things wrong and that's why he wasn't picking up on all types of words. The therapist will also train you on how to get him to say things which is awesome! Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

Hey L., i wouldn't get too worried at this point, if the Dr wants to test hearing i dont' think that ever hurts just to confirm that all is well, but i personally wouldn't get into speech therapy at this point. I had one son that spoke full sentences at 14 months...(it was amazing) he still is a talker. THe other we had to refuse to give him things or do things till he would say it....it wasn't that he couldn't talk, he chose not to...when we quit accomodating him he started talking (he was 2 1/2 by that point), he's 21 now and still not a talker.....my grandchildren as the same, one talks constantly and one just gets her point across...they are brother and sister....it sounds like your son is just fine, if he understands what you say and the commands that you give......no worries....R.

1 mom found this helpful

6 weeks can make a HUGE difference. It seems like my son woke up one morning and his vocabulary had doubled. It is very possible and I wouldn't worry to much about it. Just talk to him alot and point out what things are in his environment (airplane, truck, bus, flower, spoon, fork, etc.).
Good luck!!!

1 mom found this helpful

"What to Expect-The Toddler Years" says by 18 months they should be sayng 50+ words. I taught pre-school for 3 years and got discouraged when we would recommend a speech evaluation for a child and one parent would object. Just imagine how frustrating it can be for child who can't be understood by caregivers and friends and his parents won't do anything about it. I see absolutely no harm in having his hearing tested and having him see a speech pathologist-kids going to speech is more common than you may think. Doing this now is preferable to waiting until he's in Kindergarten when it can be embarassing.
I'm not saying there is an issue, he could just be stubborn and his language may blossom any day (even in the next 6 weeks!)But I'm sure you would do anything to help your son whenever possible. God bless, let us know what you decide and how it turns out!

1 mom found this helpful

Here's something I found online:

From 18 to 24 Months
Kids should have a vocabulary of about 20 words by 18 months and 50 or more partial words by the time they turn 2. By age 2, kids should be learning to combine two words, such as "baby crying" or "Daddy big." A 2-year-old should also be able to follow two-step commands (such as "Please pick up the toy and bring me your cup").

From 2 to 3 Years
Parents often witness an "explosion" in their child's speech. Your toddler's vocabulary should increase (to too many words to count) and he or she should routinely combine three or more words into sentences.

Comprehension also should increase — by 3 years of age, a child should begin to understand what it means to "put it on the table" or "put it under the bed." Your child also should begin to identify colors and comprehend descriptive concepts (big versus little, for example).

You can also go to ASHA.ORG and click on the child speech and language link. This is the American Speech-Language-Hearing association website. They have a public link and the top and you can futher click on normal speech development link.

I work in rehab and am familiar with speech therapy. There is nothing wrong with having to refer your child to such a service. You would rather do it now than when he's in school and that much farther behind. Usually the therapist can work with the 2 of you a couple of days a week for 1+ months, depending upon the delay...I know this is not what you want to hear, but he should be saying much more!

1 mom found this helpful

50 words that don't include family members or pets names. and they should be able to say "want drink" so like two-word phrases...that said...at 24 months other than family and pets dd could say no, yes, want, dink(drink), ice, light and bite. about 6-8 weeks later I made her mad because I had a sprite and she wanted it, all she kept saying was "want dink" and I kept saying not now as we were in the car. She got really upset started crying and then stopped crying when I got the gas station...said "mommy, want dink, NOW" I said--well, that's talking more--if you'll talk for it, you can have it...she's never shut up since. LOL!

1 mom found this helpful

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