26 answers

Advise on Dr. Prescription

I took my 10 year old son to the doctor with symptoms including a soar throat and stuffy nose. The nurse did a quick strep test that came back negative. When the doctor came in he said it was probably his sinuses. He looked in his ears and found them to be normal. Then he looked in his throat and said that he was going to prescribe him singulair and zyrtec because he felt that my son has allergies and not a virus. This just sounds fishy to me. We have never been told that my son has allergies and now suddenly we are being told that he should take two medications everyday for the rest of his life. If anyone has had a similar experience or has any thoughts about it, I would greatly appreciate some feedback.

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Thanks for all the response. First I have to clarify our situation. We are in the military so we never see the same dr twice. Getting a referral to a specialist is next to impossible. I normally wouldn't have taken him to the dr, but schools require a note in order for it to be excused and I was afraid he had strep. As far as the meds go, they cost me nothing so thats not an issue. He may very well have some mild allergies and I think that I will try the meds after we give it a week or so to see if his current symptoms clear up. Funny thing is, the dr said that the singulair had no side effects and that the zyrtec might make him sleepy. He also said that when taken together, they work parallel together. He also said that we could skip the zyrtec sometimes, but that the singulair should be taken everyday

Featured Answers

If you are concerned about allergies see a specialist and have a poke test done, I had to take in my 3 year old and its no big deal but can tell you a ton. That way you could avoid meds altogether by knowing what triggers his allergies!

1 mom found this helpful

I started having allergies when I was 12. My eyes got so itchy it drove me nuts. I took some otc meds for a short time. I rarely need anything but when it gets bad, I take something. You could wait a little while and see if it gets better, or give him the meds--or maybe just one--and see what happens there. My husband gets the same symptoms a few times a year and takes allergy meds for a few days and then is fine.

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You can become allergic to anything at any age. Does'nt really sound fishy to me at all. If you do not want to spend the money on prescriptions then you might want to try over the counter Zyrtec or Claritin. Plus the generic is cheaper. He may not have to take the pills the rest of his life. Some just need it seasonal.

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Here is a pharmacist take. The zyrtec is an antihistamine. One of the side effects of this medication is that it dries up secretions such as the mucus plugging up your son's nose and going down his throat making it sore. So even if it is a virus instead of seasonal allergies, this would definitely help with his symptoms. Typically Zyrtec is much cheaper to buy over the counter rather than going through insurance. The Singular is going to be better for allergies since it interferes with one of the allergy cascades in the body. You can definitely hold off on this for a week or so and see if the Zyrtec helps. Personally, discovered that I am allergic to dust about your sons age, then developed hay fever systoms later in my teens. I did not take anything regularly until my late-20s when I moved to what has to be the allergy capital of the US. I take OTC Claritin or Zyrtec and Singular (which truly works for me probably better than the antihistamine stuff). Anyway, don't worry right now about your son being on these medications for the rest of his life. For what you are describing these can be used for short periods to clear up a short term problem.

4 moms found this helpful

Allergies can come up at any time in a person's life. Sometimes it happens at the age your son is because many things are changing in his body at that time--and possibly even his activity levels are putting him outside or in contact with an allergen more than he was when he was younger as well.

But one thing that medical doctors don't typically get trained in is the REASON for allergies. Taken wholistically, allergic reactions are the body's way of saying that something is bothering it and preventing that allergen from getting in. Having a stuffy nose, for example, really means that a bunch of mucous is blocking entry to pollen or mold in the air, so it doesn't get into his internal system. The problem with allergies is that usually what is happening is a HYPER reaction to the allergen, rather than a reasonable and appropriate level. Somehow the body gets oversensitized and overreacts. One of the problems with using medications to stop the symptoms is that, even if the side effects don't bother him or even if it does alleviate things, what is really happening is that the problem gets pushed further into the body since it's natural reaction is being fought against. Many homeopaths I have spoken with about this say that they have learned from experience with treating asthma that there is often an allergy first. With homeopathic treatment, often the body "goes backwards" as it kicks out the illness--so someone being treated for asthma loses those symptoms but starts showing allergic symptoms again. Then the homeopathic treatment adjusts to work with the allergy, and the patient is no longer either allergic or asthmatic. But this tells homeopaths that suppressing the symptoms of allergies is one thing that causes asthma--that asthma is really also a symptom of allergies, suppressed.

A wholistic practitioner--someone who looks at how the entire body functions as a system, rather than isolating symptoms and trying to stop them--such as a naturopath, a homeopath, an acupuncturist, an herbalist, or a nutritionist--will approach things differently than just giving a medication designed to stop the "histamine" from affecting your son. Instead, that person may look at what is going on that has led to an oversensitization in the first place--perhaps dietary impurities such as artificial colors or flavors are bothering him, for example.

I know of many people who have had allergies completely or partially alleviated through nutritional therapy--either cutting out offending foods or substances, or adding in certain nutrients that may not be adequate in the diet or getting absorbed properly--and through acupuncture or homeopathy.

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how long has he had these symptoms? first of all, i wouldnt do it. even if it were true, pediatricians would refer you to an allergist. secondly, allergies many people have, but to be medicated for them, you would have a more lengthly history. im getting the impression you took him there and just because he didnt have strep throat, they said allergies. my daughter never has ear problems when she is sick but her throat hurts before a cold starts. thats how i am whenver i get a cold too. throat first, then cold. never get a fever unless its a really bad one.

im not saying he doesnt have allergies, he might. but i just think he could have sent you home saying it might be allergies, see if it goes away in 2 days by itself as a cold would, if not, see an allergist. why prescribe medicine without at least seeing if he gets a fever or feels fine in a day. what makes him so sure, not everyone always gets a fever with a virus. my husband had a negative strep test, followed my a positive one, so clearly the test isnt 100%.

i have slight allergies now, although i never did until 3 years ago. my sister has them terribly for years. i think your son will be able to tell you his symptoms if they continue if its allergies. and for everyone i know, the eyes are always involved. maybe not everyone, but the majority, you can tell its allergies by looking at their eyes.

if you give the medicine without waiting a few days, you wont know if its a cold thats better or the medicine works. as for the prick test, i dont think its reliable. my dad did it, and they said he was allergic to some type of weed, which he probaly was. then they said grass, maybe. then it said cats and dogs. we had cats and dogs our whole life. my dads current dog sleeps on my dads head at night on the pillow. we had cats that my dad would be petting for hours. he clearly has no reaction to them but the allergist is like "oh, yeah, allergic to cats and dogs". im just saying, be cautious with the results of a prick test.

1 mom found this helpful

M., it is very common to show up about this time in a person's life. I am not saying this is what your son has, but it is certainly a very realistic possibility. Certain allergens are off the chart right now in Texas. If you aren't sure, then take him to an allergy specialist. You have great options in the military so insist on it. The allergist will give your son a skin test, which is NO big deal at all. The skin test would put to rest any questions you may have in your mind. It would tell you one way or another if your son is allergic to something and if so, what he is allergic to. I have terrible allergies. I developed them around your son's age. My parents ignored the symptoms, they didn't want me to be on too much medicine and as a result I was pretty much sick my entire teenage years. I don't ever remember feeling good. As a young adult, I saw an allergist, started taking zyrtec and singulair and they changed my life. You are your son's advocate... insist on getting some answers for him.

1 mom found this helpful

Hi M. M,

Many kids develop some types of allergies as they grow. It is easy to manage. Of my three kids, one has a lot of allergies, one has occasional mild issues and the third has no problems whatsoever.

Your doctor probably suggested this to see if your son's issues would improve once he takes the medications. Since it is hard to see specialists, you might choose to observe your son for flare ups and try medicating just at those times. If he gets better each time you try this, you might be satisfied to medicate - you'll decide as he grows.

Some kids have more allergy problems. I brought my son to an allergist for testing and then we proceeded with medications as needed (not year-round.) This great doctor helped my son get to a healthier, happier phase of his life. As a college student, he is now old enough to recognize his symptoms (which are less than they used to be) and treat himself.

We all have health issues on occasion. This is definitely something you and your son can handle.

Good luck,
Parent Coach J. B.

1 mom found this helpful

If you are concerned about allergies see a specialist and have a poke test done, I had to take in my 3 year old and its no big deal but can tell you a ton. That way you could avoid meds altogether by knowing what triggers his allergies!

1 mom found this helpful

I started having allergies when I was 12. My eyes got so itchy it drove me nuts. I took some otc meds for a short time. I rarely need anything but when it gets bad, I take something. You could wait a little while and see if it gets better, or give him the meds--or maybe just one--and see what happens there. My husband gets the same symptoms a few times a year and takes allergy meds for a few days and then is fine.

1 mom found this helpful

Seasonal Allergies (Hay fever, pollen, rag weed, etc) is more likely, and I very much doubt Singulair and Zyrtec would have to be taken every day for the rest of his life. More like a month or two until the ragweed is finished.
By all means, take your son to an allergist if you want a second opinion.

1 mom found this helpful

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