35 answers

What Should a Child Know by Kindergarten?

I have a 5 year old who has been in an excellent preschool for the past 2 years. Recently, his preschool teacher told me he will be bored when he goes to kindergarten.

In his preschool the kids learn: to recognize & print their ABC's, the sounds the letters make, how to cut with scissors, how to write their names, & they begin to read. I've been told this is all stuff he will have to do again in kindergarten. Is that true? How do I keep him from getting bored & being disruptive?

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

Thanks to everyone who responded! I wasn't trying to have him skip a grade but was thinking of putting him in private school. After reading the responses, I've decided to try our local public school first. It sounds like I didn't give kindergarten teachers enough credit. I assumed they would help the kids who didn't know things & ignore the ones who did. I'm

Featured Answers

Hi T.,

I do think that it is true that he will relearn all that in Kindy. Could you send him to a different kind of Kindy where it is playbased instead of academic based? Then maybe he could just have fun and learn other physical skills until he is ready for 1st grade. I love the Waldorf philosophy. The schools offer more than just the usual reading, writing, math.

Sincerely,
gwen

1 mom found this helpful

My son started Kindergarten this year reading at a 3rd grade level and able to do 2nd grade math along with the other things you've listed. Since I taught him at home, I felt that the social learning of Kindergarten would still be valuable for him. I debated about having him skip to first grade, but in the end decided that what I most want him to learn this year is that school is fun and how to interact in that environment. He is always excited about going to school and loves telling me what they talked about even though a lot of it is stuff he already knows. I try to supplement his academic learning at home to keep him moving forward.

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

T.,

I am a teacher and a mother of a kindergartner. It sounds like your son is right on track. The knowledge base that you described, is just that a base. His kindergarten teacher will appreciate having at least one child who knows his letters and sounds (it always amazes me how many children start kindergarten and do not know how to write their name, or know their letters, colors, shapes). Unfortunately, yes kindergarten is the new first grade and so much more is expected of 5 year olds than was in the past. For some children they are ready, others are not. Check out your local kindergarten and see what is expected of children by the end of the year. Ask if the teachers differentiate the learning - so children are getting instruction at their level. I know some schools allow more advanced kindergartners to go to first grade for reading. My son is reading at a beginning second grade level and is pulled out for small group 3 times a week with other children who need more of a challenge than the rest of the class. Also find out what areas of study are also taught - science, social studies, geography. Do the kindergartners get to have gym class, art class, etc?

The key to having a succesful child in school is to be proactive. Volunteer in the classroom to observe what types of activities are going on. Talk to the teacher. Ensure that your child's needs are being met, you are the expert on your child.

2 moms found this helpful

I was shocked to find out what was required in my state! It said that children should know the basic colors (I'm guessing red, yellow, blue, green, orange, black and white) and basic shapes (probably square, circle, rectangle, triangle). And they should be able to count to twenty.
That's all it said!
My son is going to be bored stiff in kindergarten, because at 3 1/2, without preschool, he taught himself all the letters and their sounds, and how to write them. He could sound out short words, too. Now at 4 he's teaching himself lowercase letter and addition. And he's known colors like blue-green, pink, and tan since he was 2 1/2. I was considering putting him in preschool just for the social aspect, but he's past the 5 year-olds in the preschool here.
But my sister said that her kids were asked to know all the letters and their sounds when they were tested before kindergarten. That was in a different state, though, so I don't know!
My friend went through this just the past September. Her daughter could sound out and write some words (spelled wrong, but how they sounded) the spring before she started kindergarten. She was so excited for school, but after about two weeks, she cried and screamed about going to school. She was bored stiff. So they had her tested and got her into the gifted kindergarten program.
I was so relieved to hear that they exist! I know that we can find ways to keep him challenged in school while so many other kids learn their letters (which I remember doing in kindergarten!).
In the meantime, I've tried to focus on other things he can learn, and have not been teaching him any more letters, words, and numbers, unless he asks me to. There is so much beyond letters! We've gone to the library and gotten books on one topic at a time. He loved volcanoes and earthquakes, penguins, polar bears, the solar system (he's in love with that one, and now has a space bedroom!). and I try to focus on pretend play, because that's something he's not naturally inclined to do.
You know your son. If you think about it, you'll see some things to do with him that will help him be a more well-rounded kid, and ignore the letters and such until he starts school. Either he'll be interested in them again by September, or he'll still be bored and you'll have to ask his school to put him in a different program.

1 mom found this helpful

He will be bored out of his little smart mind!!! I had the same problem. First, GO to your local school and find out how they handle children who have already met (and probably surpassed) the entire Kindergarten curriculum. I suggest you make an appointment with the principal. Ask for a copy of the policy in writing and/or to actually see what they do with the kids. Bring with you and tests (such as the Kindergarten Readiness Test if your preschool administers it) a letter signed by the preschool director stating the child's abilities, and any samples of your son's work. DO NOT wait until starts Kindergarten. Public schools tend to tell you that they'll accommodate your child's needs, then they're too busy at the beginning of the year and/or they are coming up with a plan. By then, they get the "headcount" money from the state for your child being registered and attending. Now you'll be stalled until around Christmas when you'll be told that the holidays are coming up and it makes more sense to wait until January. Before you know it, they'll say it's too late to start anything. A year and a frustrated child will be the result. If the school asks for an independent assessment, have it done. A little time and money now will save you a lot of heartache later.

Also, don't buy the "they all catch up in third grade line". If that were true (and it's not), it would be because they don't do anything with your kid for all those years until he can "perform" on the state assessments. You'll see that he's "equal" at the beginning of the year, and lo and behold, they love him at the end of the year based on his scores.

Don't fall for the full-day Kindergarten line either. It's just repetitive and usually includes naptime.

I would not recommend skipping to 1st grade. He'll be the youngest and a boy. Socially, this could be a nightmare for him, especially in middle school and high school. Also, if he has any aspirations at sports, it will be difficult. Sports Associations outside school usually go by birthdate and not by grade.

If you are not happy with your local public school, see if the school districtcounty has a Gifted & Talented school (either a full school dedicated to G/T or one with a program for younger students). Some public schools also have mixed grades (half advanced Kindies and half lower 1st grade students). I would also investigate local charter schools and private schools. See if your area has an IB elementary school. A Montessori school may be a good choice as well, though you need to really investigate the program to see if it's right for you.

Whatever you do, ADVOCATE, ADVOCATE, ADVOCATE!!!! You are your child's only advocate. If you're not willing to, no one in the system will. Don't wait until he's frustrated and is labeled a behavior problem to act. Find the best situation for him now, before he starts school.

Been there, done that THREE TIMES! Can you tell?? You have a bright child who should be encouraged, not discouraged.

My very best wishes for you and your son! God Bless!

1 mom found this helpful

I have two daughters...the eldest is 23 and the youger is 7. Let me tell you how much things changed in 16 years. My eldest had to know how to zip and tie, write recognize and say her alphabet, and cut and glue. My younger daughter had to know how to read the first day, they even had spelling tests in kindergarten. She went to a very prestigous pre school for two years and she was not ready for scholl academically. School has been very stressful for her and she feels "stupid" at times. Luckily I moved to a school that is in a little town where there are 5 children in her second grade class. She improved an entire grade level in one semester. She is the youngest in her class and will graduate about a month before her 18th birthday. If you are concerned that your son will be miserable I suggest he be tested at the school he is to enroll in. That way you can get some honest feedback. School is much harder than it was when we were young and the expectations are much higher. Don't be surprised if struggles a little, even if you think he is more advanced than the other children...M.

1 mom found this helpful

Hi T.,

I do think that it is true that he will relearn all that in Kindy. Could you send him to a different kind of Kindy where it is playbased instead of academic based? Then maybe he could just have fun and learn other physical skills until he is ready for 1st grade. I love the Waldorf philosophy. The schools offer more than just the usual reading, writing, math.

Sincerely,
gwen

1 mom found this helpful

I can't imagine boredome in kindergarten! Don't let his preschool teacher discourage you. I have 3 daughters and my youngest is in kindergarten now. They will be doing much of what you explain he has been exposed to in preschool but it will be turned up a notch. Paige (just turned 6) loves to learn and there are so many activities and exercises they are involved in, not to mention the social aspect of it!! She was also in a very good preschool program for almost 2 years and she has loved every minute of kindergarten - she is always excited to talk about what she learned in class. I wouldn't worry about it too much...wait until he is closer to starting and talk with his teacher about your concerns.
My middle daughter is my little braniac and is now in 5th grade. She tends to finish her in-class work quickly but her teachers recognized it and gave her additional activities, which she loved, to keep her focus on what the rest of the class was doing...that being said, she was never bored in Kindergarten!

1 mom found this helpful

Hi T., I am both a grandmother and a teacher.

First, my children found a book that phonetically teaches children to read. They each worked with their children, and had them reading--real reading-before they started Kindergarten. Each of their kids could have skipped a grade, but they chose not to. Now each child is a strong student with good self-esteem, and some have been passed up, in reading skills, by the other students.

What is harder to change than reading skills, is our self concept. Had each been put ahead, they would have been with children one year older. That means that they are always behind in growth, social skills (that are developed as the brain develops, not as how parents wish it to be!)and even learning abilities.

You might drop by the class room and see what size todays kindergartener's are, compared to your son. Watch them, and notice the things that they have learned, half way through the year. They will go into 1st grade with that whole years training, that your son will be missing if he skipped ahead.

One of my daughters had to keep reminding the teacher that while her son read well, he needed all the other skills that Kindergarteners learn, that only she (the K. teacher) could teach him.

As a teacher, I can tell you that the older, smarter children in the class are generally the leaders in scholastics and in games, etc. Put a group of little kids together, and they usually sense who is older, and follow them. Kindergarten teachers can usually tell, within a few weeks, which children are the older, because their brains are able to process sociability on a higher level than the younger students.

As a Mom, I sent my oldest to school a year early--(where I was living that year, the cutoff day was Dec., but where I would live the rest of my life, the cut off day was Sept. I chose to send this Oct.29th baby to school that year.)

Yes, she is smart, but she always had to try her best, which makes her an intense, high-achiever person today. Also, in sports, and emotional development, life would have been that much better for her had she had another year at home.
These are my experience. Hope thay give you some insights.

1 mom found this helpful

I don't think you have to worry. The public kindergarten my son went to after 2 years of preschool was amazing. They had spelling words by the 2nd week, they were already expected to know what you are describing your 5 year old has learned in preschool. I would call and make a meeting with whatever school your child is going to attend and find out what their curriculum is. I have friends that moved their kids up after 1st grade because the kids were doing so well. For one of the kids that worked well for the other it wasn't only the academic but also the age appropriate friends, he wasn't ready for the social difference of kids a full year older and ended up going back and doing advanced things in the class with kids his age and did great.
Definitely make an appointment with the school.
Hope this helped.
S.

1 mom found this helpful

My daughter is now a first grader, and had gained much of the same knowledge while in pre-school that your son has, but her kindergarten experience was rewarding anyway. She only improved her skills, and felt confident when she already knew something. The new social environment was enough for her to handle as it was. She enjoyed making new friends and being part of a routine in a much bigger class of kids than she had been with in pre-school. I don't think I'd have him skip a grade, if that's what you're thinking. I think it would put too much pressure on him, which is much worse than being a little bored. If he does seem really bored, I'd encourage yout to ask the teacher to give him some more challenging tasks. Good luck!

A little about me: I'm a SAHM with 4 and 6 1/2 year old girls and a great husband. I ski as much as possible while they're in school!

1 mom found this helpful

My son started Kindergarten this year reading at a 3rd grade level and able to do 2nd grade math along with the other things you've listed. Since I taught him at home, I felt that the social learning of Kindergarten would still be valuable for him. I debated about having him skip to first grade, but in the end decided that what I most want him to learn this year is that school is fun and how to interact in that environment. He is always excited about going to school and loves telling me what they talked about even though a lot of it is stuff he already knows. I try to supplement his academic learning at home to keep him moving forward.

1 mom found this helpful

I had my son in a great preschool that taught the same things as your son is learning. My son was not bored at school. There was enough new things to see and do, and many of the teachers use small groups to monitor reading skills and other subjects to keep the students progressing and to challenge them. Just keep in contact with the teacher and volunteer in his classroom if possible.

1 mom found this helpful

I have taught preschool for many years and am also the mother of a very advanced child (now in middle school) I think in this day in age it is typical for preschools to teach what used to be taught in Kindergarten and that most schools have adapted accordingly. I would set up a meeting with the school and find out exactly what they teach and how and share your concerns. I have a kindergartener this year and at his school which is a local charter school they ability group the children for math and reading/writing even in Kindergarten.

1 mom found this helpful

Sarah M. responded that her her child already got spelling words in the second week of kindergarten! What's the matter with schools?! Are school boards insane? :(

Yes, they are since they are unquestioningly following the dictates of No Child Left Behind. I am so appalled at what's happening in today's American kindergartens. Experts too are worried about this new trend to push academics onto young kids. In fact, in many kindergartens kids no longer get to play or nap!! Seriously! There's no more playing with blocks, puzzles or doing imaginative crafts! Even classroom pets have been removed.

This is not a good thing! Studies show that kids deprived of play in childhood grow up to be poorly adjusted socially and many of them turn into criminals.
No wonder then that we are already spending more money on building prisons than on education! No wonder then that prisons are privatized as there will be lots of profit to be made in the decades ahead once these kids graduate, if they graduate at all and are not burned out on "learning" before then!

People who eliminate play from kindergarten are not concerned with the well-being of young children. They simply follow the dictates of the business lobby! CEO's have no understanding of how children develop and learn best. They don't care what child development experts say. They see children as future workers who will simply conform and do as told. NCLB is the perfect ploy to accomplish their goal.
I've visited three different Kindergarten classrooms and am heart-broken about how young kids are treated; their developmental and emotional needs ignored!

So, please go visit and find out what your son may get to experience. In the current situation there's no way I would have enrolled my own kids in kindergarten, or in the elementary grades where the 90 minute reading program each day saps the kids' enjoyment of reading. BTW, this program is also implemented in the K-classes. That's why they did away with play. For more see whatkidsneed.org

1 mom found this helpful

How will the pre-school teacher know for sure your son will be bored? She/He is not him and she shouldn't discourage like that! Your son will discover and learn new things in kindy. My boys (4 & 7)have each gone to the same pre-school and learned the things you listed. My oldest thrived in kindy by having a strong base and adding to it. Sure, he'll cut, write his name, begin to read, etc. in addition to learning more concepts in math, science, writing, art, etc. Isn't great that he already knows all of that and won't have to struggle? He will be ready to take in the NEW info that his teacher will provide. I found the kindy was not a repeat of pre-school at all; it was more in-depth and there were higher expectations of my son and the others academically and socially. Most of the children in his class possessed those skills you listed and the teacher differentiated the learning to adapt to the variety of skill levels (as she/he should). If the children already know how to do certain things, the teacher will move them on and challenge them.

I used to teach high school and every now and then I'd get the "my son/daughter is bored" which drives most teachers nuts! At that age it's mostly b/c of a poor skill base leading to frustration and also not understanding material and then the "I'm bored" syndrome appears. Students/children, when encouraged appropriately, can and will seek out their own challenges in school. I agree w/ another responder who mentioned watching what you say around your child and encourage him to find the challenges available rather than always waiting for entertainment, etc.

Bottom line: check out the kindergarten, talk w/ the teacher as to what the curriculum is, etc., and if you can, volunteer. It's a great way to get to know the teacher and see hands-on what is going and, it's fun! You will appreciate all of the work teachers do by helping them out. Don't stress too much over this; he's not taking his ACT tomorrow. Your son is right where he needs to be so give your son the chance at kindergarten and you will both enjoy it!

1 mom found this helpful

I was once a cocky little kindergartener who came in already reading quite well. I don't actually remember being bored, although sometimes I think I was frustrated that I had to convince teachers that I could do things already. There was always something new to learn in the art projects or in the areas I wasn't so advanced. And especially there was still a lot to learn socially. (I think that took me longer than usual. My kindergarten teacher told my mother I wouldn't ever have any friends.)

Most classrooms I was in had more advanced optional reading and other projects for those whose skills were advanced beyond the rest of the class. You can also make sure he's continuing to get opportunities to learn new things outside of school if you think he's not getting enough stimulation in class.

The thing I would ask is whether your preschool teacher is noticing that your son tends to have behavior problems when he's "bored". If not, then hopefully he can learn what there is to be learned, whether it's really part of the lesson plan or just part of interacting with a class full of kids.

1 mom found this helpful

i have four children all having already been thru kindergarten and it's been my experience that the school really adapts to the different levels that kindergarten kids enter in on. when i was little kindergarten was all just abc's and 123's, finger painting and snack time.. lol. but now days they end up learning to read books, time on the computer, and starting some math addition. kids are sooo smart.. i just hope we all remember to let them have their time as just kids. a kindergarten teacher once told me that when school starts at the first of the year.. there is a big difference between the kids that went to preschool and the ones that didn't but usually by half way thru kindergarten you can't tell anymore which ones were which. good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

T.,
Don't worry he will be fine. My daughter is in K-5 and loves it. When we went into the "testing" they checked to see how high she could count, her alphabet, she did a drawing for motor skills. The teacher was concerned because she was 4 when school started and thought I might be pushing her too much. But she is doing great. They are learning to read by phonics. Make sure your school does that! They have learned printing very well and are now starting cursive writting. She is also learning time, and math skills. Adding and subtracting. YOur son will not be bored. If he is ask the teacher if there is any extra work she can give him or see if he can maybe help others.

You can always buy those little work books and maybe send them along for him to do while the other kids are doing stuff he already knows. Talk with the teacher and calm yourself.

J.

1 mom found this helpful

The goal of most kindergartens is that the child have previous knowledge by the time they reach 1st grade. Have you considered a private school that would push him? Or we're homeschooling for that reasons. Our son started K-5 the week of his 4th birthday since he wanted to be in school so badly. We've taken it slowly. We're at the end of first semester, but he's only missed about 5 points all year and is totally loving it. I love it, because they give enough new stuff that he thinks he's learning even though so much of it was stuff he already knew. We plan to do 1st grade next year, although we're not completely decided. You might look at the different curriculums. Maybe your son is ready for 1st grade work, especially if done at home where you can take it at your own pace.

1 mom found this helpful

Of course it's true. Preschool is not mandatory in the United States so of course that stuff will all be retaught in Kindergarten, which is good at this age. But a lot more material will also be covered.

To some extent being bored at school is normal. Every child is bored in school at times. There are times in everyone's life in which you just have to deal with boredom. Every child needs to learn how to behave appropriately when bored and for the most part it is not something that is taught but learned from experience. I'd be careful with what you say around him though because you can actually cause problems if you vocalize your concern that he will be bored within hearing distance of him. Being bored is never an excuse for misbehavior. A GOOD teacher will know how to challenge him individually at his own reading level and will use him to teach others which will in turn solidify his own understanding of things. And if not...part of parenting is teaching. You can enhance his reading at home with the help of the local library. And if he's really head of his class than he is now handed the opportunity to learn new things that other kids who are at home struggling with school-work are not able to. Encourage him in other areas like sports and arts and music. Being head of the class is a GOOD thing, not a bad thing.

1 mom found this helpful

I have a "kindie" this year and we were a little shocked at the start of the year when we were given a list about what he should "know" at the end of kindergarten. Our son also went to a top pre-school and when he entered kindergarten he had already mastered the "to be learned" list. I was very concerned that he would be bored and lose interest in school! So I spoke with my mom, a retired elementary school teacher, and she put my mind at ease. she explained that academics is really a small part of kindergarten it is very socially focused.....For some kids Kindergarten is tough because they have two areas to worry about social and academics. They have never written their name, can't read, etc....For my son it has been great and while the class work is very easy for him I think he feels proud of the fact that he is one of the top students in the class and he has been able to focus on his peer relationships.

the alternative is to put him in a private kindergarten which are more academically challenging but then he is going to be ahead in 1st grade.....

1 mom found this helpful

I just quit teaching kindergarten in public schools to be a SAHM, and he definitely is ahead of the game. Two things you may want to look into:
Most districts have an accelerated program. I would check into the protocol to get him tested for it.
Second, have you considered homeschooling? I know the lack of socialization can be a big downer, but that can be helped with involvement with sports, playgroups, church activities, etc. Just a thought. That way you can move at his pace, and he gets the one-on-one we all want for our kids.
One more thing that is a possibility but pretty rare is looking into him skipping a grade. I had a child that read on about a 4th grade level coming in to kindergarten, and his math and other academic and social (which is a huge part of kindergarten) skills were right up there with reading. With all of the red tape, etc., it took about 3 months, but we got him switched to 1st grade. Most administration is not big on this because a lot of parents think their child is a lot smarter than they really are. (What parent doesn't? :)) They don't want every child trying to skip a grade, but if he's really THAT ahead, they'll look at it.
Hope that helps. PBSkids.com has some assessments you can do with him to see where he is academically. Let me know if you have questions.

1 mom found this helpful

There isn't a standard set of what a child will know going into kindergarten. You have really helped your child to be well adjusted when he enters. Yes, your son may be bored. The best thing to do is now as you are registering your child for kindergarten, talk to the counselor at the elementary school. Ask that your son be placed with a teacher who will know how to challenge your son. Both my children entered kindergarten already reading chapter books by themselves. For my second child, I spoke to the school, they assessed her and gave her a teacher that challenged her. She read chapter books while other students in her class were still learning their letters. I did not know enough to do this for my first child and she was bored silly until about half way through the year. At that time, we moved and changed schools. She was then put in with a teacher that could multi-task and handle children at a variety of levels. Not all kindergarten teachers can handle the wide variety of students they are given and it really makes a difference if there are disruptive children in the class that makes it even more challenging for the teachers. If they need to handle multiple lessons plans and continually stop to correct children to keep them on task, then the whole class suffers.

1 mom found this helpful

Have you thought about homeschooling? It sounds like your family might fit really well into unschooling especially. Bring your little boy back home if he is bored. It sounds like he needs more attention and stimulation. He can learn at his own pace with homeschooling and unschooling. Check out some books by John Holt to learn more about unschooling.

There are numerous homeschool groups that gather weekly for activities. Let me know if you need any contact information.

A.

1 mom found this helpful

Every school district is different when it comes to their curriculum. Have a talk with the teacher he will have next year. Our school used this time to get the kids used to a classroom routine, lessons due, lots of writing, and the long days.

1 mom found this helpful

T. P,
It is true. I had the same issue with my oldest. He is 7 now. Lucky for us he has had great teachers so far. He was reading before he went to Kindergarten. Kindergarten was a social learning experience for him. The teacher was aware of him and a few others in the class that were on top of the game. She grouped them together and altered their school work.
The only thing I can tell you is to be a great advocate for your child. Ask the teachers questions about altering his school work to challenge him. If your school district or even your school has an accelerated learning program research it and test into it(Usually available for testing into 1st on up). If you have to and it is an option, look into interviewing different principals at different schools and see what they are offering there. You may have to change schools to get the education your child deserves. I have also found at our school that the secretaries are very helpful with any information I need and where I can find anything they don't know right off. Fight for their education. Good Luck!

Stacie

1 mom found this helpful

I am the assistant director at St. Johns Lutheran ELC near Washington Park. I have been teaching and directing for 18 years. I have taught toddlers, preschool, pre-K, Kindergarten and 4th grade. I am a little sad your Pre-K teacher told you he would be bored. A child who is ready to learn should never be bored given a great teacher and an environment where learning takes place in many different ways. Your child does "know" a lot and that is terrific! Kindgergarten is hard because children come into K on so many different levels and that is where the teacher can make the difference. Public Schools have huge ratios and while they work with all the children, they end up working mostly with those children who are behind.
I would suggest you visit several kindergartens and make a full observation as well as interview the teacher. The things to look for are an environment that embraces learning through play and a teacher who recognizes children are individuals and will work with each one of them on the skills they need to learn.
You can also do a lot to help your child continue to learn. Read, Read, Read! Play, Play, play! I invite you to check out our school. Our kindergarten teacher is great! My daughter is in kindergarten this year and is having fun while learning at the same time. I don't beleive she is ever bored even though she came in knowing many of the skills your son has too. If you are in the central Denver area, please call ###-###-#### to set up a visit.

1 mom found this helpful

I know you put in a "so what happened" entry, but I'm compelled to give you my part, anyway.

I'm a private tutor. I have a Kindergartener I homeschool, and a preschooler. Like any other part of development, kids do things when they're ready. Period. You can vary the building blocks and give them different tools and forums, but they'll only build on what they remember. If yours remembers more, give him more and different forums to use it. Don't worry about advancing him because he's strong in one or six areas, because there are hundreds to collect information from.

1 mom found this helpful

Hello T.,
Your child is learning at the time in his life that learning is easiest. That is great for him. What you can do to help is be an advocate for your child when he starts kindergarten. Be sure that the teacher is informed about his present level and your concerns about him being bored. Also, continue to give him great educational experiences at home.
I am a mother of 4 and a grandmother of 4. I am also a retired elementary teacher and a present school board member.
Good luck with your exceptional young man. S. C.

1 mom found this helpful

I have one word for you - homeschool. I have been homeschooling for 11 years now (I have four children), and I can't tell you how happy I am that I made that decision so many years ago. Each of my children is different, has different learning styles and interests, and homeschooling them has given us all the opportunity to grow and learn together. There are so many books and websites on the subject now that it's easy to find information about the subject. You can even google "homeschooling" and add the name of your city to the search, and you will find the names of homeschooling groups in your area so you can attend some events and talk to homeschoolers in person.

Good luck to you and your family, whatever you decide.

Make sure his kindergarten teacher knows his abilities when he starts school. Many children don't know these things yet so they will be covered in kindergarten. However, many children do know all of these things so hopefully they will be able to help him at his level.

T., I'm not sure where in teh country you are but yes some of the things your 5 year old has done in preschool he will be doing again in kindergarten but hopefully his teacher will recognize that he already knows it and will be able to give him other things to learn. You should also find out if kindergarden in compulsory in your state. Here in Colorado, it isn't, a fact that most people don't know. If kindergarten isn't compulsory you may be able to find other enrichment programs for your son to do to keep him learning. What you don't want is for your child to become bored with school.

Another option is to see what kind of schooling options you have. Again in colorado we have neighborhood schools and choice schools, charter and of course private. Neighborhood schools are the school that all the kids in your neighborhood go to. Choice schools are 2 different types, one type is where the parents feel that their neighborhood school isn't a good fit for their child so they enroll them in another public school that fits there needs. The other type is an alternative education environment that is also a public school but does things a little differently. My daughter attends one of the later. It is an experiential learning environment for prek - 12th grade children that encourages finding and following their passions. They learn all the basics, but in addition take extended trips starting in 4th grade. Where students need help they get it (for instance my daughter needed extra help with reading for about 2 years) but if they are "above grade level" they aren't held back (again during the same time my daughter was needing help with reading her math skills were beyond her group so she was allowed to take more challenging math classes with the middle school students). If you don't have many options, then discuss with the teachers during the "kindergarten round up" (that's what kindergarten sign up is called here in our school district) about what your child already knows, and how they will be able to accommodate him. Remember you are your childs advocate in every aspect of his life. Kindergarten sets the pace for the rest of his school career. Make sure it is a good year.

First go talk to the Kindergarten he will be attending. They will give you curriculum. I doubt he will be bored. He will learn the fundamentals of reading, currency, how to tell time, math and social studies. He will learn about other countries and see the world is a lot bigger then the classroom. My daughter went into Kindergarten being able to read a few words at first and by the end of the year was reading at a first grade level!
The principal as well as the Kindergarten teacher will give you a full year idea of what he will be learning. They here at least work with different kids at different levels too, putting them in groups, so if he is advanced he will have the opportunity to help kids that maybe haven't had exposure to preschool. I wouldn't worry too much at all, sounds like your preschool teacher is jumping to conclusions too early on.

From my experience with 4 kids, that is what is required to know prior to entering Kindergarten these days. Kindergarten is the new 1st grade now, you don't learn all those things anymore like you used to in it, you HAVE to know all that stuff before entering, or they will ask you to put your child back into preschool. They begin reading, writing and doing math right away, so your son is right where he should be. Also, did you know that Kindergarten is not even required in the state of Colorado? (not sure about other states) It's optional!
Your son will be fine, if anything, go to your elementary school and speak with one of the Kindergarten teachers.

You might want to talk to your school. They may have advanced classes available. If not, try calling other schools/daycares. You may just want to call your school district and see what they have to offer.

Don't give up. There are a lot of resources out there!

K.

My 5yo started kindergarten last year after a similar preschool program. He thrived in both preschool and kg. I suppose it depends on your school. We were at Ryan Elem in Lafayette. It is a math/science focus school, and I was amazed how much math and science they did, in addition to reading and writing, of course. Talk with the kindergarten teacher! And set the expectation for your son that being disruptive is not okay, even if he's bored! He can start learning now how to get the most out of his environment, instead of expecting to be entertained or 'taught' the whole time!

Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.