What Is Glutin??

Updated on November 21, 2008
J.H. asks from Independence, MO
35 answers

i have a four year old son who is on the autistic spectrum. we incounter many behavior problems due to his diagnosis. i have recently heard about taking glutin out of his diet to help with his treatment. i have done alittle recearch and it seems to be in everything. i need to know what is glutin? And if it is almost everything we eat what can we feed him?

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A.S.

answers from Kansas City on

Hi J.,
Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and oats.

I did a detox this summer which called for a gluten free diet and I found that my body actually performed soo much better without the gluten and it was actually pretty easy to do. In fact, I have deceieded to stay gluten free as much as possible.

There are lots of great products out there that are now gluten free. you can find breads, pastas and even cererals. you just need to read labels.

I shop at Whole Foods and Hen house and both stores have a good selection. Do you live in KC? Hyvee also has a good selection.

At Whole Foods if you ask for it, they will give you a list of all the products in thier store that is gluten free. It is 32 pages long.

there are a ton of places on line that also sell gluten free items.

http://www.gluten.com/

i hope this helps.

A.

1 mom found this helpful
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J.E.

answers from St. Louis on

Go to www.befreeforme.com which is a website a friend of mine started when she was diagnosed with celiac disease and has to eat gluton free products. It has some good tips, product info, coupons, etc. Good luck.

1 mom found this helpful
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M.H.

answers from Kansas City on

Glutin is the substance in wheat that make it make such good bread. It is the elastic substance. It is in many many foods either from Wheat, Rye, Barley, Modified food Starch and products that are processed with these substances. You can find Glutin free products in the health section of HyVee, at Emerald Forrest in OP, at Whole foods. Some taste good and some are not so good. I like the rice crackers, some of the pasta, and some of the bread is not so bad. Try the internet. Also try celiac disease. Good Luck.

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C.H.

answers from Kansas City on

As another mom said, gluten (with an "e," if you're doing a Google search) is a protein found in many grains. Wheat is the main culprit, though there are others. Gluten is in MOST prepared foods and other things you wouldn't think of: lickable sticker backs and lipsticks, among others. You have to scour labels very carefully.

Dr. Jeremy Baptist is an allergist in OP who specializes in autism. You might look him up.

D.B.

answers from St. Louis on

Hi J.. Gluten is basically wheat, to what I understand. And yes it is in EVERYTHING! I also have a 4 yr old w/ ASD, he was diagnosed about 1 1/2 yrs ago, and right away people were forcing the diet on me and my husband, telling me things like, " Jenny McCarthy put her son on the GFCF diet, and he is HEALED"- which that is just great for her, but sorry my son will always be "autistic" no matter what I do to help him through this. My son has also started alot of new behavior issues, but we just try to redirect him, because it is mostly here at home(so far) where he knows he can push our buttons to the extreme. He currently attend the Early Childhood Center here where we live, and has responded very well to his classroom curriculum, his therapies, so that is why I dont have him on the diet.( Ive heard that you really have to cut everything out of their diet, and the families.) He is a very picky eater anyway, so I think it would be very difficult to even try to take gluten, or casin(dairy-he doesnt like it to begin with) out of his diet. BUT, this is my story and there are alot of people have been doing the diet, and it works for them. I just believe that you have to do what you think your child is responding to the most. My problem now is that my son gets runny nose, sneezing, and congestion like every 3 weeks, so I was told to take him to see an allergist. Have you talked to your son's neurologist/pediatrician regarding the diet? I know you can just google it and find out more information, I did once see on a website all the foods and stores, like Trader Joes & Whole Foods that carry most of the foods, but alot of other groceries carry some as well.They also have recipe books at the libray and book stores. I hope that this helps some, I just saw your post and what you wrote about yourself, it reminded me of myself. I stay at home too, and besides my ASD son, I have a very busy busy little 2 year old, AND yes, a Daddy to take care of as well. It is overwheleming, and etremely stressful, I know talking to other parents of kiddos with special needs helps me to cope... so, if you ever need to talk, just let me know! ANd good luck to you with whatever you do decide! Take care. :)

D. B.

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S.T.

answers from St. Louis on

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Wheat is so hard to avoid, but it is possible. Just research gluten free diets. People with celiacs disease must eat this way so it can be done. I've also heard to avoid casein to help treat autism. That is in meat. Many autistic children do well not eating meat. Hope this helps.

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B.S.

answers from Kansas City on

Hi J., Glutin I believe is a wheat products and yes it is in a lot of foods and yes it can effect a lot of people's health in different ways and they not even know it. Organic foods would be the way to go. Whole foods, or Natures Pantry in the KC area sell groceries that are stated on the label glutin free. I may spell this wrong but check out celiac disease. It is a disorder that if you have it you need to avoid glutin products. Good luck to you!

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J.M.

answers from Kansas City on

When I saw your email, I thought about J. McCarthy's book about how she is helping her autistic son. She was on Oprah not too long ago and she is very passionate about fighting autism and how she focused on a gluten-free diet for her son. I googled it....
http://www.amazon.com/Louder-Than-Words-Mothers-Journey/d...

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A.S.

answers from St. Louis on

Hi!
There are lots of gluten-free cookbooks, easily found both at libraries and bookstores. Also, many "health food" stores stock gluten-free products. I recommend trying-- we got a cookbook and read some of the information b/c my son was diagnosed with asperger's and possible adhd. You know what? We eliminated different kinds of foods based on the cookbook's recommendations. He's actually just sensitive to artificial colors and flavors, and does not have adhd or aspergers!
Good luck, and don't let anyone dissuade you from trying!

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K.G.

answers from St. Louis on

Look at labels. Anything that says, "Contains: WHEAT" should not be eaten.
Here are some things that are "safe":
Fruits and vegetables prepared at home with wheat-free seasoning
Chipotle foods
Unbreaded meats prepared almost any way
Rice noodles (Asian section)
Corn tortillas
Dairy: yogurt, cottage cheese, cheese
Some canned soups (check to see that they do not contain wheat)
Rice Chex cereal
Oatmeal
Cornmeal

It is a lot easier to eat gluten-free if you prepare foods at home, but there are some great gluten-free options in the freezer section of Dierbergs, at Whole Foods, and in the organic/specialty section of Schnucks.

Good luck!

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K.H.

answers from Kansas City on

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease 7 years ago, a gluten-free diet is a way of life for me. You have recieved some excellent advice in previous posts. The one thing I did not see in any other posts was when reading the labels on food products you MUST be aware of "modified food starch". No one knows what is in that because it is "modified" so steer clear of these products. You will find this in alot of products. If it is a product that you feel you can't live without contact the company and find out exactly what is in their "modified" food starch. On another note, a good flour substitute for thickening (like gravy etc.) is corn starch. Just do your research and take a look at the websites others have posted. It takes a major committment on your part, but once you accept a gluten-free way of life it will get easier. Good luck and blessings to you and your family.

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B.S.

answers from Topeka on

My grandson has autism and they give him only glutin free foods. My daughter in law, Nancy and Mark are their names and their email is [email protected]____.com grandson is about 14 years old now so I am sure she could help you. B. Strong

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A.L.

answers from St. Louis on

I am not totally sure. but go to Lives web site. today thry had someone on whose son had Autism and really turned it around with diet and vitaimins. best wishes. I know it got to be hard. Live with Regis and Kelly

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T.J.

answers from St. Louis on

Here's a link that will explain what gluten is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluten

When autistic children go on the gluten-free diet it can less the signs of autism and help them control their behaviors and help handle their meltdowns. Gluten like other food allergies can be a hidden food allergy. After doing much research before my son was diagnosed with autism I found out that DAN doctors (defeat autism now) recommend this diet they also believe a gluten or casein can cause an allergy induced autism. Here's a link on casein http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casein I have a 3 year old son with autism and he's on the diet. After just one day of being on the diet it proved effective and was worth it though I had to make most of his food from scratch but really wasn't that hard. The say 9 out of 10 autistic children or adults on this diet it will work though results may not show for up to 6 weeks to 8 weeks. The diet is well worth it, if it does work from my experience. Here's some recipes if you would like to try the diet these are gluten-free and casein-free http://www.gfutah.org/gfcfrecipes/index.htm. You can purchase the flours and other ingredients at healthfood stores and whole food stores. I also recommend you get someone to watch your son while you shop if you do this diet, the first week is hard off gluten because it can be like addiction for them.

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D.C.

answers from Kansas City on

Hi J.. First I want to tell you about the group EFECT. It is a group of parents that have children with some type of disability. They have lots and lots of parents with children on the spectrum and many of them do the GFCG diet. Their website is www.efect.org. Gluten like the woman said is a wheat protein. So you have to cut out all wheat flour products. There are many types of flour that you can buy at your local grocery store now, just go to the organic section. Casien is found in perservatives which is why the lady said something about meat, a lot of families with kids on the spectrum by free range organic fed animals. That way they don't have the perservatives in them. Look up GFCF diet and you will find lots and lots of info. I know if you live in the Lees Summit area there is a support group for people that use this diet. Good luck!

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P.W.

answers from St. Louis on

Hi J.. I have a 9 y/o son with Autism. We tried the GFCF (gluten free/casien free)diet. Unfortunately it did not work for my son. Just like everything else it helps some children others it doesn't. This web site is great if you are thinking about "the diet" http://www.talkaboutcuringautism.org/index.htm. I don't like the name of the web page because in my opinion there is no cure for autism. It is definately for a try though. It takes lots of dedication. Please email me ([email protected]____.com) if you'd like more info. I've got several web sites.

P.

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T.S.

answers from Wichita on

Hi J.. I know all about gluten. My 6 yo daughter was diagnosed with celiac disease last April. That means she cannot have gluten. The gluten does damage to her intestines and she gets no nourishment to her body. Basically starves to death. I have done a lot of research. Gluten is a small little part of wheat. They use it as a filler in so many foods. But it is so much easier than you think to eat gluten free. It is a lifestyle change. Lots of fruit and vegetables. There are so many flour subsitutes. It really is kind of disturbing when you see how many foods have fillers. They say removing gluten can help with autism and asthma and skin problems. Both of my daughters have eczema and asthma. We eat a lot of chicken and potatoes. There are also a lot of foods that are not labeled that they have gluten. If you ever have any questions email me. [email protected]____.com My daughter and I are making a gluten free cookbook with all of her favorite recipes. That's going to be are Christmas gift to everyone this year. I can tell you what is good and what is not. We have tried a lot. Call me too if you would like. My number is ###-###-#### at home and ###-###-#### at work. I think it certainly worth a try. Good Luck!

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D.L.

answers from Topeka on

Glutin is the part of the food that makes it filling(to put in simple terms). You can buy glutin free products in health food stores but it is expensive, also your child will probably still be hungry after eating so be prepared for changes. My child is on the spectrum also and have discovered it is best for him just to eat all natural. He eats raw vegetables and fruits with basic meat included. No grain unless it is glutin free. We have no additives, no restaurants, no quick meals. It takes planning and careful shopping but you can do it.

Good luck,
D.

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J.H.

answers from Kansas City on

Dear J.--Gluten is a type of protein found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley. With some children on the Autism Spectrum, removing gluten and/or casein (a substance found in dairy products)from their diet has a positive effect on their autism-related symptoms/behaviors. It is a process requiring dedication and vigilance: you must remove all things with gluten, and learn to cook in a different way (some refer to it as going back to traditional cooking--not alot of pre-processed foods are gluten-free). I will tell you that this can be done successfully, and, if it works for the child, most parent find it is worth the effort.
I work for the Missouri Developmental Disabilities Resource Center/Family 2 Family Resource Center at the Institute for Human Development-UMKC. Here I have a packet of information that you can have, free of charge, about creating a "gluten free and/or caesin free" enviroment for your child. We also have a network of mentor parents through our Sharing Our Strengths Support Matching Network. We have among our mentor parents, families who do use a gluten free/caesin free diet that would be willing to discuss with you the process they went thru, why they use the diet, the effects they have seen, etc. Both the packet and the mentors are available to you at no cost. If you would like the information and/or a connection with our mentor program, please call the Missouri Developmental Disabilities Resource Center at ###-###-#### or, if you are outside the KC area, 800-444-0821. I hope to hear from you soon! sincerely, J. Hatfield-Callen

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S.F.

answers from St. Louis on

Gluten is a special type of protein that is commonly found in rye, wheat, and barley. Therefore, it is found in most types of cereals and in many types of bread. Not all foods from the grain family, however, contain gluten. Examples of grains that do not have gluten include wild rice, corn, buckwheat, millet, amaranth, quinoa, teff, oats, soybeans, and sunflower seeds.

Gluten can be removed from wheat flour by rinsing bread dough and kneading it until all of the starch is removed. Gluten helps make bread elastic and provides it with the chewy texture it has when eaten. For this reason, gluten that is removed from dough is sticky and feels much like chewing gum.

Gluten provides many additional important qualities to bread. For example, gluten keeps the gases that are released during fermentation in the dough, so the bread is able to rise before it is baked. In addition, gluten firms up when it is cooked and, with the help of starch, helps ensure the bread maintains its proper shape.

Gluten also has an absorbent quality, which is why bread is capable of soaking up broth. Because of this feature, gluten is often used by those on a vegetarian diet as an imitation meat. On the downside, gluten is believed to be partly responsible for causing bread to become stale.

Some people suffer from a disease called celiac disease, which is an allergy to gluten. Individuals with celiac disease must eat foods that do not contain gluten in order to prevent illness. If improperly treated, celiac disease can be fatal. In addition, care must be taken when eating grains that do not contain gluten, particularly oats and teff, as they are commonly grown near foods with gluten or processed in the same bins. Catholic sufferers of celiac disease must also exercise precaution, as wheat, which contains gluten, is a required ingredient in the wafers used for certain religious ceremonies.

Category

Health and Wellness

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Here is the web-site there is posts from people who have this allergy.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-gluten.htm

All that being said, check the Taste of Home web-site for gluton free recipes. Goodluck!

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C.M.

answers from Kansas City on

I think you have gotten some good advice about glutin but I wanted to add something that might be helpful to you. I read something recently (I wish I could remember where) that said that doctors are learning that Autism is made worse by a lack of amino acids in the diet. I think that they were specifically the talking about the Omega acids like those found in fish and nuts. Jenny McCarthy has been a huge advacate for Autism and has recently wrote a book about the struggles that she has had with her son. I haven't read it or anything but her story might give you some good places to start. I know that she helped her son mostly through changes in diet. Good luck and don't give up!

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S.R.

answers from Columbia on

My neice suffers for this borderline issue as well with Autism. She is in third grade now and it has been a struggle from the very beginning, but easier now than it was. My siter has found, that what would be Boring and repetitive to us, is what her daughter actual needs in her diet and just life regimen in general. Repetitive actions, and food items, and routine is what will keep my neice in a very low level of anxiety and fearful outbursts. Bedtime rituals that are exactly the same, at the same time , in the same way, even so far as wearing the same pajamas or similiar or ones that she is given the opportunity to choose makes her feel safe and secure and is very much more "tame" and less prone to the emotional rollercoaster that she was putting everyone through. When a disrupt in the norm is necess. due to unforseeable events , I know my sister takes great lengths to prepare her mentally , and physically for the change before the change occurs. She even asks Rachel how she would want to address the change and how can Mommy help her feel comfortable with the change and they work at it together. Quite frankly it has to be scary for kids too to feel this way and not want to be over reactive to life issues, but their little bodies just don't have that ability.You would feel insecure if you just felt overwhelmed by the simplist of issues and wonder if you had just lost your mind, you know?

LOWER sugar snacks and starchy foods at all costs. REMOVE them completely. No potatoes or starches of any kind and noodles or bread. The only thing that Rachel is allowed to have really is Cheetos, because they are the ONE thing that she will want in crisis, so this is her one indulgence. She stayed over with my family and dinner was really surprising. We have a rule , if you don't eat what we fix, then maybe the next meal will taste better and more to your liking, but you do not get to have ANYTHING in between if you are not a satisfied eater at the meal before. She missed several meals at our house, and I became concerned. I'm like what WILL she eat then? ... My sister said she was sorry that she did not tell me, but there is only a couple of things that she does feel comforatble eating and now she has declared herself a vegetarian ??? as a third grader? LOL. So she does eat healthy things and wants to choose them,but he idea of healthy is only fruits and veggies. Bless her heart. Shawn said that they only thing Rach eats for lunch is an open faced "smiley faced" sandwich. Which consists of peanut butter spread on a slice of low carb bread with raisins or other little treats to make a smiley face on the bread and then she uses her pampered chef little circle cutter to make a circular sandwich. But she literally eats this ONE thing everyday and does not stray from this at all.
But this is the only carbs she may intake of at all. She snacks on carrots and celery and natural sugars only. Apples , she loves grapes and etc. Infact that is ALL she ate my house , lol .

I think really it is very similiar to a Low Carb, or Atkins diet or maybe even someone who is diabetic ? I'm not the doctor on that one, but that is just what works for my sister. When "kid" occassions come up like Halloween and such, she gives in to anything that she wants like any other normal child and just gets ready and geared up for the results of that indulgence in her activities , and mental state, and HER own preparedness for what could come as a result of all that sugar and what not. She also has a younger child who has Downs Syndrome, so that is another challenge she faces daily as well.

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B.C.

answers from Kansas City on

Gluten is basically wheat - anything with wheat in it. Like MSG - Mono sodium glutamate - this is a form of gluten and is used as a preservative (when you go to chinese restaurants they will have signs or on their menu 'no msg'). Celiac disease is gluten allergy. If you look up Gluten Free diet or diets for people with celiac disease you should find a lot of good info.

We have a friend with Asperger's and he has behavioral allergies to food - including gluten. I think you will see some improvement with changing the diet. You can use rice flour as a substitute for regular flour.

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A.P.

answers from Joplin on

I am a teacher who recently went to an awesome conference about chilhood disoreders. Gluten is the protein in wheat, oats, rye and barley. I know that I have seen bread mixes that are gluten free. Having a gluten diet is hard but you are doing something great for your child. The doctor who did this conference said if you do the diet and that is a trigger for your child you will notice a change in a month. We watched a short video clip of a mom who did the gluten diet with her autistic son and said it was hard but the best thing she had ever done. I recieved some wonderful information from this doctor. I hope that explains what gluten is, and does seem to be in everything!

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J.B.

answers from St. Louis on

You have received a lot of good responses as to what gluten is and how it CAN help reduce the signs of Autism. Please know that there is no known cure for Autism and that a gluten-free diet may or may not help your child. Many other therapies can also help reduce the signs of Autism: occupational therapy with sensory integration, speech-language therapy, developmental therapy/special education... Being in a class where your child has lots of positive typically developing peers will also provide him with many 'good' role models. A 'shadow' or para-professional can help him in his class to monitor behavior and encourage therapy techniques to reach his goals. At this stage, if you are entered into the public school district, you should be familiar with the IEP (Individualized Education Plan) process... if you are not, please call your local school district and let them know you have a child with a diagnosis of Autism and would like to receive services. Hopefully they can help you.

I used to work as a speech-language pathologist and saw many children with Autism of varying degrees. Some parents swore by the gluten-free diet and some saw no change. I am certainly not trying to burst your bubble by any means, but just give a realistic perspective that it may or may not help your individual little man.

It sounds like your personal life might be a bit hectic. Children with Autism thrive on routine, so if there is anything you or your husband can do to make things more systematic, 'expected' or routinized, I encourage you to make those changes (dinner at 6, bathtime at 8, bedtime at 9).

And finally - find time for yourself. Either through support groups with other parents experiencing the same thing... or just a night alone with a hot bath. :)

Good luck with finding what works for you and your family. You are not alone in this.

Best wishes,
J

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N.L.

answers from St. Louis on

The gluten free diet can be very expensive.
I recommend amazon.com for the cheapest way to purchase gluten free flour, plus most of them are delivered free (make sure you specifically select the free shipping option during checkout).
All the best. I hope this helps your son.

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S.H.

answers from Wichita on

Its a protein found in wheats and grains that we eat all the time! My friend has Crones Disease and because of it is on a gluten free diet. Surprisingly there are many foods out there that are gluten free for those who cannot eat it. Many health food stores have them as well. My friend eats lots of white rice because it has not gluten in it. Do some research on the web, call the doctor and get some suggestions. Its doable, but takes consistency and effort. Good luck!!

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J.Q.

answers from Kansas City on

I see lots of good responses but also some that truly are not informed about the gluten-free diet. I am experienced first-hand in eating and cooking gluten-free and avoiding many other foods as well. My daughter was diagnosed with many, many food allergies at one year old and could not have gluten, dairy, soy, egg whites, bananas, coconut, almonds, peanuts, and the list goes on. Yes, it does take dedication and yes you need to be committed, but it is very possible and not as bad as one might think to eat this way. It can be very healthy as too many people rely on wheat for everything. Some mentioned that oats do not contain gluten and that is false. There are specially made oats that you can now find that are certified gluten-free. Also, I have many recipes that I found online too. My local Hy-Vee health market has many gluten free foods as well as Whole Foods. Pamelas products are wonderful---some of the best I've found. Especially her cake and brownie mix. Also, my local Hy-Vee (135th & Antioch) carries this millet bread in the health market section in the freezer. It is the best gluten-free bread I have found and tastes good. They make hot dog buns, ham buns, rolls, bagels, etc. It comes from a bakery in Florida called Deland's. Look them up online as you can order in quantity from the bakery and freeze the extra. Also, I want to mention the place that I took my daughter to as they helped us more than anyone with diagnosing her problems and explaining the food allergies and the gluten-free diet. It is a husband/wife chiropractic team and they have four children of their own with food allegies. They all eat a gluten-free diet so they can meet with you and recommend all the products. They do take most insurances and I am positive can help your little boy. Please check them out as they are amazing. Do hang in there!! I know it is tough and feels very overwhelming. It is a whole change in the way that you shop and cook. But, you can do it! Once you figure out what you can cook and eat it is managable. One more thing..the best rice noodles I have found are Tinkyada brand. Taste just like regular noodles. Please contact me if you have any more questions.

Cardin Chiropractic
9159 W. 133rd
Overland Park, KS 66213
###-###-####
www.cardinchiropractic.com

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C.S.

answers from St. Louis on

J.,

I briefly looked through the previous responses and it looks like you have gotten some good advise. Try to google for recipes that are glutin/caesin free. When we did this diet with my son we found that he liked the foods that were home made better. Especially the bread which pretty much tastes terrible. Also, something that nobody told me, behavior can get worse before it gets better when switching to this diet (something about the detoxing). My son was a bear for about 2 weeks. Good luck!

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C.G.

answers from Columbia on

Not sure what grocery stores are near you, but if you go to a health food store, they usually have a gluten free section (I have even seen gluten free flour, pancake mix, pasta, etc.). A health food section at a larger grocery store would probably have a gluten free section too. If not, you could probably request that they start carrying certain items.
Best wishes!

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M.B.

answers from Kansas City on

I don't eat gluten, and I didn't let my daughter have any until she was past a year old. It's not as hard as you'd think.

In general terms, the dairy, meat, fruit and vegetable groups are okay. (Provided they're not mixed with gluten, of course.) Gluten is primarily found in wheat, although you have to beware rye and barley, if you eat those things, and some say you should avoid oatmeal. (I don't.) This means I rely a lot on corn and rice (corn tortillas instead of flour tortillas, etc.) although there are many other grains out there. Best of all there are gluten-free versions of pretty much everything-- bread, cookies, donuts, cereal, pasta.

Just a starting point. Feel free to contact me with questions! I live this every day!

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C.K.

answers from Springfield on

J.,
I am a Director of Nutrition for a public school District, and have encountered this several times recently.
Glutin is found in grains such as wheat & barley, that's the simple answer.
Unfortunatly, you will find glutin in 100's of products, from breads to sauce mixes and everything in-between.
Fresh, whole fruits and vegetables are the best and safest way to avoid any glutin and well as offering chicken and fish and some red meat.
I have heard from parents that a glutin free diet has made remarkable changes in autism/behavior.
When your son starts school be sure to speak to the food service staff regarding this diet restriction. They may insist on a note from his Dr. They shouldn't but they may....
By law they must meet his needs.
Good luck
C.

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C.S.

answers from Kansas City on

Hi J.,

I have celiac disease and I can't have anything with gluten(wheat flour). In my case I can't have anything with wheat, barley, oat flour. If you go to hyvee or whole foods and price chopper is now carrying some products. The food is more expensive but it tastes really good. If you are trying to cook dinner and not sure what to make without gluten here are a couple suggestions. You can prepare chicken anyway you want and if you are going to bread it use corn flakes as bread crumbs. You can make as much white, brown rice as you want. Veggies aren't a problem. You can make as much or little real potatoes and there is even instant that you can make which is Idahoan. If you want to make chicken noodle soup use swanson chicken broth and either corn, rice or potato noodles. It seems hard at first but it will get easier. Good luck.

C.

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S.W.

answers from St. Louis on

In many grocery stores and especially in stores in like Whole Foods there are many gluten free foods in special sections.

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D.R.

answers from St. Louis on

Gluten is basically wheat products. My son also autistic (Asberger's, specifically), and I can tell you that just by decreasing his gluten intake, it made a difference. The biggest difference though was with lactose. We put him on soy milk, and what a difference in his personality!
You can find gluten and lactose free products at any grocery store. Dierbergs and Shop-n-Save have a great selection. You can find cook books at book stores and on line. The food really is pretty good. Soy pasta is a little sweeter in taste than regular pasta, but if it helps, go for it! By the way-even gummy bears have gluten!
But there is a great variety of food out there now so you will have a lot to choose from. Good luck!

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