Post Falls Mom homeschooling.Good Advice Appreciated.

Updated on March 07, 2008
D.D. asks from Post Falls, ID
29 answers

I have a very intelligent, self motivated 15 year old, 9th grader, begging to be homeschooled. We homeschooled last year at the end of Semester. We were in between moves and school districts. I did everthing I could to find info on homeschooling with in my community and online. I basically searched out school work for her age appropriate and made work, studdied it, taught it, then graded it.(it got very exhausting!) I also did this for my 2nd grader. I added in my own arts, crafts, learning bussiness, (in a short form)and taught them about animals of their choice for field trip activities. We went as far as finding a horse owner who let us ride for an afternoon after a couple weeks of studying horses. This time around though, my teenager is overwhelmed with issues in highschool, among other issues with her personally. I want to do the best for her in homeschooling, keeping her challenged. I am hoping for some helpful advice. I have checked into K-12 for next fall, as it seems to be very structured which is what I am looking for.

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So What Happened?

WoW! Thank you everyone for all the helpful advice! To clear up any confusion. I am praying over this decission. My daughter suffers from several medical issues, which can bring on emotional issues as well. Not many people are aware of this, she shows her self to be strong. This is wearing on her liitle body and I just want to do what is best for her.
Again, Thank you and God bless.
D. D

More Answers

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K.R.

answers from Portland on

Good for you for listening to what your daughter needs right now.

I encourage you to look into Unschooling.

A related book that I found very inspiring was "Free at Last: The Sudbury Valley School."

Kids want to grow (God created us to grow in Joy!). If she needs some home-focussed time, she needs that, and thank you for meeting that need now instead of asking her to repress it :)!

School teaches arbitrary authority, and high school esepcially teaches students to expect arbitrary authority and constant change and distraction ... I am always boggled that people are suprised when Gen X and Gen Y (I'm Gen X) can't "stick" things (jobs, marriage, payment plans) or get sucked into TV etc ... as kids the last several American generations were taught they could never trust their own desires, and the way to deal with the dissatisfaction was to distract themselves ...

Anyhow, I'll stop ranting. Your daughter is what's important, and you clearly know that. YAY :)!

(Rant is partly because my soon-to-be ex won't trust that children will educate themselves ... and we have them in an alternative school that is WAYYYY more developmentally appropriate than standard school, but it is still a school, and curriculae applied to a group are always pushing some kids and dropping others :(. I was highly "successful" in academia--it is amazing how completely inapplicable it has been to actually _living_.)

God bless and have fun with your time together :)!

2 moms found this helpful
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C.C.

answers from Spokane on

When your daughter turns 16, consider enrolling her in some college courses at North Idaho College. Public school, private school, and homeschooled teenagers can enroll as dual credit students, basically earning HS and college credits at the same time. The biggest advantage is that the cost is less than half the standard tuition rate. Plus, the credits are fully transferable. If your daughter is academically ready, she could get a jump start on her college career for a very reasonable cost. Students can take classes on the main campus, at outreach centers, or on the internet. Great opportunity! You can call the NIC Dual Credit office at ###-###-####. Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful
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A.B.

answers from Portland on

D.,
Several of my friends/acquaintances have tried program called Connections. It is a public school, but run entirely online (I think the fuul name is "Connections Academy"). It would free you of doing this huge prep work, as they provide curriculum and everything. I have a feeling your older daughter has a good reason to ask for homeschooling. Who knows if she wants a highly structured program-maybe she had some traumatizing experience and wants some time out. I never felt brave enough to try homeschooling, but I hear that it is easier when you don't have to reinvent the wheel. I am sure there are many other good curricula-I just never heard of them,
A.

1 mom found this helpful
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C.J.

answers from Eugene on

I homeschooled my daughter in 7th, 8th, and 11th grades. It was very difficult with a teen, but she's now in college and doing well. We did it because she has health problems. My advice to you is, if she wants to do it in 9th grade, see if the public school provides a home-study teacher who can help you with lessons and grading. I had that advantage as well as my own teaching experience at a community college. The other community college instructors and students helped me a lot. I had college students come to my house for tutoring sessions and just to visit. You might check into that resource in your area as well. Finally, we used Sylvan Learning Center for math tutoring as my daughter struggles with math. Having an outside tutor really helped!

I'd say in summary, my advice is don't try to do it all yourself. Enlist others' help, and as far as social contacts, see if the public school in your area will allow your daughter to attend dances and sports events.

Good luck and God bless you!
cj

1 mom found this helpful
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M.S.

answers from Portland on

I've got the perfect solution for you... I just came across it a couple months ago and am going to do it with my daughter next year!

I don't know where you live, but both Oregon and Washington offer online public school. You are basically homeschooling them, but all the supplies and lesson plans are supplied to you FREE! The Washington Virtual Academy (WAVA) uses the K-12 curriculum. They'll take placement tests so each subject will be geared specifically to where your child is at. They can work as fast or as slow as you choose. It requires about 4 hours of work per day on the child's part.

WWW.WAVA.ORG (Washington Virtual Academy)
WWW.K12.COM
WWW.ORVSD.org (Oregon Virtual Shool District)

Just an extra side note... They also offer many socialization opportunities with the other students doing the school as well as field trips once a month.

1 mom found this helpful
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K.O.

answers from Portland on

I'm sorry, but I have to throw in my two cents. I think home schooling is a bad idea. There are so many things that going to school teaches that kids don't get at home. Such as the structure of having to get your butt out of bed and to school every morning, not only that but being able to successfully move between each class through out the day. Also, there are all the social experiences kids get at school. I realize that the curriculum in some school districts is sub-par and that school is a one size fits all design; which isn't always ideal. But still, if you are unimpressed with the school system then supplement at home, don't forgo the school experience all together. School is a preparation for the structure and socialization of the work environment, these are things that I don't believe can be taught at home.

1 mom found this helpful
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L.B.

answers from Seattle on

Hi D., I am a Christian homeschooling mom of 5 kids. I'm really just schooling my oldest 3 right now (10,12,13). My kids were in school and two years ago we started homeschooling. I also have a 4 yr. old and 2 yr. old. We use a curriculum called Sonlight. It's structured, literature based and great for families with kids close in age because I use 1 curriculum for all three kids. They each have their own appropriate level math and my expectations for writing are different based on age, but for the most part we all study the same thing. It has all the lesson plans etc. All I have to do is execute it. No hours of planning lessons. I'm kinda new to Mommasource so I'm not sure if you are living in the Puyallup area, but there are several homeschool co-op's in the area that could really provide alot of support for you and your highschooler. Lighthouse Co-op is one, ACTS is another. Also, the YMCA has a PE co-op we participate in. Lastly, Have you been to the Homeschool Fair in Puyallup? It's incredible. It's always in late May or early June at the Fairgrounds. It's mainly a curriculum fair, but they also have a few classes each year on homeschooling. Blessings in your endevours, L.

1 mom found this helpful
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H.P.

answers from Seattle on

I currently homeschool an 8 year old daughter using K-12 through the state of WA so it is free for us. We both like it because it does give us options and is structured enough that I am sure that my daughter is getting all of her basic skills. If your daughter does not like high school, there is really no reason to attend because all the peer crap can take away from her academics and really affect her future if she does not perform well because of social issues. It is WAY more important to get a good background in college prep work. If she wants to, she can also get into a RUnning Start program at 16 to get college credit while still in high school, a very good investment of time for free credits. I like the structure of K-12 because I can educate my 8 year old while being able to give the 3 year old the necessary attention.

H.

1 mom found this helpful
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T.N.

answers from Portland on

I'm a bit confussed on if you want to encourage your daughter to stay in school or wanting to find ways to homeschool her. I home school our 12 year old daughter thru the Clackamas Web Academy. I would highly reccommend their program. It is computer based, they provide the laptop and the only expense to you is providing internet connection. Everything else is free of charge. We have an assigned teacher that meets with us every other week and is always avaialble to help via phone or email. They have had such a demand for their services they are growing and providing so much more than just schooling. Students get free membership to 24 hour fitness, extra-curricular activities availalbe and the best part is the student can work at their own pace, they could get thru two years in one if that's the objective. You can work at any time of the day, etc... Our daughter had many health problems which caused her to miss school a lot and ultimatley getting behind and always feeling 'lost' at school. Not to mention social "mean girl" issues, too. Before the Web Academy, I struggled finding work for her to do...this program provides it all. I belive they are accepting new students for next years enrollment. Their website is clackamaswebacademy.com and you do not have to be within the clackamas school district to take advantage of their services. My daughter had trouble with 'social issues' at public school as well as moral issues (we're Christians and that can't be expressed in the public school setting)this program has provided us with a great alternative. Good luck!

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K.S.

answers from Portland on

If you live in the Vancouver, WA area, then a great school would be Vancouver Home Connections. You go to the school 2-3 days a week and do the rest of the work/hours at home. I recomend this school because you still get some social experiences but you do get some homeschooling time. The regular high school setting is not for everyone but this setting st the school is different. I would recomend going to the school website or calling them. The number is ###-###-#### and the website can be found at www.vansd.org under locate a [high] school. Good Luck!!

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K.B.

answers from Seattle on

There is free homeschooling available from insight schools.
They give you a laptop to use and printer.

http://www.isucceedvhs.net/

They have online help with classes, an adviser and you can talk to teachers by phone or online.
Parents also can log in to check for information from teachers and grades.

If you are looking for a Christian Based program you can look up Homestudy international it is also accredited, it is from kindergarten through college.
Good luck!
K.

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A.M.

answers from Portland on

I'm sure you did a great job at homeschooling - I couldn't imagine taking that on like so many do.

The thing that concerns me is why your 15-year old is begging to be homeschooled. You mention that she is overwhelmed. I would hesitate in teaching her that hiding her cute self away is the right way to deal with those kinds of feelings. High school is tough and scary and you couldn't pay me to go through it again. But it does teach you a certain amount of skills in a social setting that she will have to deal with soon enough that homeschooling can't.

Good luck with whatever you do!

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V.R.

answers from Portland on

Rainbow Resource Center is a good place to shop for homeschool curriculum. Great prices! I think it's Rainbowresource.com. Homeschooling is great for families and if your kids are asking for it, then I think that is definetly the way to go. Don't be discouraged by the ney sayers that the goverment education is the only way to socialize your kids and prepare them for the future. Look at the results of homeschoolers overall. They far exceed kids with public education both in education and socialization!
I'm a Christian homeschooler of a 6 and 8 year old and we have two littler ones and one more on the way! God Bless and may he direct you!

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L.R.

answers from Portland on

My parents run a nonprofit educational curriculum company called TOPS Learning Systems that's very popular with homeschoolers. It's science-based, which is great, because that's the area many homeschoolers seem to need a little help with. Please check them out at Topscience.org.

My mom is also a regular on Mamasource (hi mom!). She's the one who does all the illustrations for the books.

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D.B.

answers from Seattle on

I am not sure what the question is, but I think it is about curriculum. I personally found the SOS school system from Alpha Omega easy to use and keep up with. It is computer based system that frees me up from the bulk of planning and grading, allowing me to dive into extra studies and fieldtrips.

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R.M.

answers from Anchorage on

I'm an eclectic homeschooler thus far but even if you prefer a package curriculum Rainbow Resources is great for supplements etc.
http://rainbowresource.com/index.php
It's a Christian homeschooling resource catalog with TONS of stuff (the paper version is the size of a phone book).

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N.R.

answers from Spokane on

Hey D.,
It's weird, but we live in Post Falls as well. If you still would like some advice, e-mail me privately, and I will give you my phone number and I will help you as much as I can. My daughter is also 15, and would love someone to talk to. We live kind of far out of town, and don't have many friends because we too have moved a lot. I love homeschooling, and have done it for 8 years now.
Anyway, my email is [email protected]____.com
Talk to you soon
N.

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G.R.

answers from Spokane on

Hi D. - If you are looking for public home school options here in Idaho there are several. From what I know they are charter schools but do majority of it online. They will even help with computers & internet coverage. One of the biggest here in Idaho is http://www.idahova.org/ & I have heard some good things about them. Another is http://www.idahoidea.org/Main/Default.aspx, I think this one is not virtual but I could be wrong. Here are two others I have heard about but do not know much about them: http://www.connectionsacademy.com/state/home.asp?schoolCo...
http://www.rmckenna.org/
Homeschooling is a tough job. Right now my 1st grader is able to be in a small private school & I am glad that I have that option for his as homeschooling would be more of a challenge with him. My younger son I think it would be easier. Just take the time to review the options put there & what would work best for you. Take Care

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B.Y.

answers from Seattle on

I LOVED WAVA! www.wava.org they teach the K-12 stuff. But they only go up to 9th grade I think. There are other virtual schools that you can do. I think there might be a list on the k-12 web page.
The nice thing about wava is that you do not have to pay for anything.
Good luck

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P.J.

answers from Seattle on

Steilacoom school district has a homeschooling curriculum that is on CDROM (I believe) It provides everything the child needs at home and is paid for by the school district. My neighbor uses it for her daughter.
I would encourage you to Home School your daughter who is requesting it, there are so many things kids are being distracted by in the school environment these days.
Another option, of course would be a Christian High School. My daughter attends one in Tacoma. It's wonderful!
P.

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T.M.

answers from Salt Lake City on

Hey D.,
I homeschool my 3rd grade daughter with WAVA that used 'K-12' curriculum. We have only done it for a year but have really grown to love it. It is very easy to use. I have my daughter involved in outside activities, plus she attends the monthly field trips that are planned by the coordinating teacher. It also is considered public school so you don't have to buy the curriculm. If you would like to check it out go to www.wava.org There will be an open house march 26 at Firstenburg community center at 4pm.

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M.N.

answers from Yakima on

I know that there is a online school program they may help you.I think it is on the States OSPI site if you have internet access. I say listen to your daughter if she thrives with Homeschooling or research Private Schools. If you choose Homeschooling she can take choir,band,art, or whatever she might like at your Public High School.

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M.M.

answers from Anchorage on

Check out calvertschool.org, they sell the entire course for the school year and have an advisory teacher service also, if you wish to use them. I have had wonderful luck with courses and will use them again next year. I haven't had any high schoolers yet, but their elementary classes are wonderful. Good luck, don't give up and have fun with your kids!!!!

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C.A.

answers from Seattle on

I love the ACE program. ACE stands for Accelerated Christian Education. The kids work in PACEs (Packets of Accelerated Christian Education). Each PACE is a workbook of 24-40 pages. All of th information is in there with questions and tests. The goal is to complete 12 PACEs for each subject each year. The child works in each subject at their own level ("above" or "below" typical grade level) and pace (as fast or slow as they want/need). I did this for 7 years growing up and I am now using it with my kids. Go to www.schooloftomorrow.com for more information. They even have a free diagnostic placement test online. Good luck! And have fun!

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J.N.

answers from Seattle on

My friend teaches for WAVA and loves it. She does the K-8 and it is run in connection with the Steilacom public schools, but I know that there is a 9-12 portion run through Monroe public schools that is part of WAVA. They teach the K-12 curriculum and it's great because you don't have to create everything youtself and you have a certified teacher to conference with on a consistent basis and help you out when the curriculum is over your head! Also, many school districts have Homeschool Resource centers, where it is set up kind of like a college and your child can sign up for classes there. That way she gets some interaction with peers (other homeschoolers) and she can learn something (like a forgien langiuage or drama) that might be beyond your ability to teach or you need more kids to do! I know both the Edmonds School District and the Northshore School District have versions of these. It would be worth checking with your school district to see if they have a similar program.

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B.A.

answers from Augusta on

I was homeschooled through high school and my parents let me be very involved in choosing my curriculum. I used A-Beka for most things, but used Saxon for math.

My parents pretty much got me the books and materials and then set me free to finish the books by the end of the year. They checked on me once a week or so and my dad would give me oral examinations every once in a while (a pop quiz of sorts) to make sure I was learning from the books.

I was very motivated and my parents didn't really need to do any "teaching" per se. I was motivated enough to do the work myself. I also chose to take band classes at the local high school, which got me out of the house and interacting with my peers.

It was a very positive experience, and I don't think my parents did all that much after getting me the materials and encouraging me in every way. I kept myself challenged just fine :)

Best wishes!

~B.

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J.O.

answers from Seattle on

My aunt homeschools my cousins. There is a school out of California that is one of the few accepted by clolleges. It is an online school I believe. I cant remeber the exact name but it has something to do with Pear. I wish I had been homeschooled. The social issues at highschool are worth protecting your kids from.

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A.C.

answers from Spokane on

I have a Christian friend who lives in Elk who homeschooled her 3 kids, now 26, 23, and 20. She used "Homelink" which was sort of an enhancement for home schooled kids. Here is a link to it's homepage:

http://www.homelinkprogram.org/

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T.K.

answers from Medford on

I homeschooled for years and my siblings were homeschooled as well so I have had some experience in this area. My advice would be to start with a complete curriculum and then add, remove or change as you go. Personally, my favorite is "Sonlight" curriculum. They are an excellent source of knowledge and they approach learning in such a fun way that my kids adored it. My son (now 13) is an avid history buff because of the way Sonlight approached learning about the Civil War. (He used to hate history.) My daughter (now 10) has gone back and reread the entire second grade line up of books (including the ones that *I* had read aloud, because she just, "loved them so much and missed them."

Sonlight is also very structured and gives you exact words to say to the younger grades when they skip a step or whatnot and yet it is easily adaptable to whatever you feel comfortable with doing. We adore Sonlight.

~T.~
mom to Micah (13), Savannah (10), Jerusha (6), Silas (2)

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