Once House Broken Dog Needs Retraining After Move

Updated on June 27, 2008
J.M. asks from Naperville, IL
7 answers

We have just moved into a new home and every since our arrival our dog is suddenly not housebroken anymore. She's spending even less time alone then she used to since the move has cut an hour off of my commute so I don't understand the sudden incontinence. I hate to leave her in the cage all day while I'm out but the problem has gotten so bad that my boyfriend has requested (bordering or demanding) that I get rid of her. I think she may just be acting out from the stress of the move but even if that's the case, understanding the behavior isn't helping me correct it. Do anyone have any suggestions on how to quickly retrain her? Or maybe how help her adjust to the new house so she'll quit ruining the rugs.

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R.V.

answers from Chicago on

I'm not sure of the solution, But what ever you do don't get rid of her for your boy friend.

At one time in my life my boyfriend made me choose and I had to get rid of the dog. It was the worst mistake of my life. Even thought I gave her to my parents to have; every time I came to visit I could tell that my dog was so upset and heart broken.

All I can say don't get rid of her, just keep working with her.

Thank you
R.

2 moms found this helpful
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D.W.

answers from Chicago on

Hi J.,

We've fostered 16 rescue dogs and rehousebreaking is a common issue when you move the dog into a new environment. Try using the dog's instinct to keep its den (where it eats and sleeps) clean, by limiting her space again -- the same way you do when you start housebreaking a dog. It's probably best to start with her crate. Once she's reliable in the crate, then you can gradually give her a little more space. We'd give the rescue dog run of the kitchen next (using babygates to gate off that area). If she's really reliable there, then you can give her another room to roam in. The trick is to do it gradually, so that she starts to think of all the new, larger areas as part of her "den" too. It would usually take us about 2-3 weeks to rehousebreak a dog, provided there weren't any medical problems like urinary tract infections that might be causing incontinence.

Good luck!
D.

2 moms found this helpful
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B.

answers from Chicago on

Hi J.: You need to go back to square one and
re-train the same way you did when she was a puppy.
If you can't watch her, crate her or keep her in
a non-carpet area of the house using baby gates...
Take her outside on a regular schedule, based on her
usual times she goes, and stay with her till she
goes. If you have to, keep her on lead to keep her
in the right area and on task.
If she goes, praise her! Let her stay out and play if
that is what she likes, or play with her a few minutes
as a reward.
Give her freedom to the whole house only as she realizes
where to go and starts asking to go out...
If you catch her in the act of going, clap your hands sharply and say "outside, go potty" and take her out. Hopefully
she will hold some and then go outside so you can praise her.
Don't be angry with her, it takes time to get used to
new things. Have you ever moved something in the house
to a new place? Like where you keep your keys? How long
does it take before you stop going to the old key place first?! :-)
If she is still having trouble, you might want to get her
checked for kidney or bladder infection...you never know,
she might not be able to hold it.

Good luck
Barbara McNinch
Canine Behavior Specialist, A+ Dog Training, Crystal Lake, IL.

1 mom found this helpful
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J.A.

answers from Chicago on

Hi, I have a few questions: 1) Tell me about your boyfriend's relationship with your dog 2) How long have you had your dog 3) What breed is your dog 4)How old is your dog I am a dog trainer, and I will try and help you. There is more to this, than just the move, so, I need to know all the circumstances before I can help you with the problem, but, I will be glad to help. J.

1 mom found this helpful
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K.C.

answers from Chicago on

I'm not sure if your dog is young or old. I think your dog is just reacting to the new setting and surroundings. He/She is confused and probably a little intimidated. It is definately not cruel to cage your dog all day. Most dogs actually find that more comforting that being in a big house all by its self. Some dogs can't handle new open territory very well. It takes them a lot of time to get adjusted to a new setting. I think you'll find that your dog will adjust better if you confine his/her surroundings a little bit. Little by little you can open up the space. You can, after a little bit of time, put the cage in a small room and leave the door to the cage open. This worked very well for my dog. I hope you don't have to give up your dog!!!

1 mom found this helpful
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R.F.

answers from Chicago on

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Kritter Kare
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N.O.

answers from Chicago on

Hi J.,

I'm sure the dog trainer knows more than me, but I'm guessing amongst other things your dog might be covering up another animal's scent - maybe the previous owners had a dog or cat?

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