My Little Boy Is Allergic to Eggs.

Updated on July 07, 2008
D.M. asks from Ottawa, KS
15 answers

Hello, I have a two year old son who is allergic to eggs and we found that out when he was a little over a year old with a skin allergy test. We never give him anything that has egg in it. I was wondering if there was other mom's out there who's children are allergic to eggs or any other kind of foods and if they have out grown it? I just want to know if my son will ever out grow this allergy. Thanks!

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M.G.

answers from Los Angeles on

Is it the yolk or the white or just all together? Most kids do grow out of it may be you will try again later with organic free range eggs.

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S.T.

answers from Los Angeles on

I don't know enough to actually answer your specific question, but I wanted to share a business my girlfriend has. Her daughter has severe food allergies and she almost lost her daughter at infancy. Her daughter is now a happy, energetic 7-year-old and they have learned to manage the allergies. My girlfriend, Michele, has opened a bakery in Los Osos that wholesales only allergy friendly foods. Everything is dairy, egg, and nut free. She found it so difficult to get baked goods for her daughter and had to come up with all her own recipes. She has turned it into an awesome business. Check out her website: sweetalexis.com. And, good luck with your son!!!

1 mom found this helpful
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D.P.

answers from San Diego on

My nephew has severe food allergies. He's allergic to eggs, wheat, dairy, corn, and peaches. He breaks out in hives if anything with eggs in it touches his skin! She is very much into cooking, especially baking so not being able to use wheat or corn flour or eggs has changed things a lot for her. There are egg replacers you can use while cooking. Often times natural food stores carry them. My nephew had an allergy test around 10mos old and is now 18mos. He has not outgrown the allergies, but my sis-in-law is hoping and praying!

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R.L.

answers from Los Angeles on

Hi D.,

Many children with food allergies outgrow some or all of them after several years of avoidance. Others do not. You should also be aware that allergy is a progressive disease. Sensitivity to inhaled allergens (for example, molds, pollens, dust mite and cockroach feces, animal dander) often arise in school-aged children, sometimes replacing food allergies, other times in addition to them. The disease can culminate in allergic asthma.

The best therapy is strict avoidance. A couple of studies that have combined avoidance with long-term use of nonsedating antihistamines in very young children have shown a significant reduction in the percentage of children going on to develop asthma. Immunotherapy can also be very effective, but is usually not used for food allergies. I can find no scientific basis for NAET, and no objective papers that have been published on the topic. In my opinion, it is potentially very dangerous in that it does not effect a real cure and someone with anaphylaxis could come to serious harm by exposing themselves to an allergen that they are supposed to be "cured" of.

Even without the antihistamines, strict avoidance is best. Like with many other diseases, the real damage is caused by the immune and inflammatory responses that the disease causes, not by the disease agent itself. If you don't start the immune response, you don't get the inflammation and damage.

By the way, allergies are often thought to "come and go." This is and isn't true. The genetic basis for allergy will always be with an individual, but will not always be expressed. Environmental factors play a big role. Other irritants, such as second-hand smoke, exhaust and pollution, can add to the allergic response or elevate a low-level response that would not elicit symptoms to a high level response that does. Also, if a person is allergic to several different things, avoidance to all of the allergens might not be necessary if there is strict avoidance to all of the most major ones under certain circumstances. For example, if you're allergic to dust mites, but at a low level, you might not see any reaction. But, if you're allergic to dust mites and cat dander, once you add that cat into the mix you could be sneezing like crazy. But, if you remove the dust mites, you might not react to the cat at all.

Good luck with your son. Living with multiple allergies can be very limitting, but not impossible. Hopefully, he'll outgrow the allergies before he reaches the age when he wants to share food with other children, which is when the real challenges can begin!

R.

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D.V.

answers from Las Vegas on

D., my daughter was highly allergic to eggs and did "outgrow" it. It took 5 years! They say that if a child has not outgrown an allergy by age 5, he likely never will. My daughter pushed that right to the limit! But it is also entirely possible that the allergy will revisit her at some point. It's pretty common, and it actually happened with me and my egg allergy as well. Pregnancy did wonderful things to me, and I am no longer allergic to eggs, thank goodness! They have us avoiding all eggs with my sons until they are 5 as a precaution, since it is common in our family. Be really strict with an elimination diet, as your son's likelihood of outgrowing his allergy is greater if he can completely avoid the offending food for a minimum of 2 years. Basically, you have to give his immune system time to mature and "forget" that it was sensitized to egg protein. There is a wonderful product called "Ener-G" egg replacer that makes baking a lot easier. It is a white powder, made from rice or potato or something like that, that you mix with water and substitute for eggs in baked goods. You can find it in a health food store or the natural foods sections of some grocery stores. It's in a yellow box. I always kept a batch of cupcakes in my freezer so that whenever there were birthday celebration at school, etc, I could send a cupcake in with my daughter so she could participate. You just pull one cupcake out of your freezer bag and frost it with your favorite frosting. It will be thawed and ready to eat very quickly, and it saves a lot of heartache for a child who doesn't understand why he can't eat what everyone else does. Have your son retested at age 5, and if it comes back negative, start with just egg yolk, cooked into something else like a baked good so that it is not just straight egg. Best of luck with this!

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J.D.

answers from Los Angeles on

My daughter was born and still is severely allergic to eggs along with several other foods. It was very hard for many years to do without these food items but now it has gotten much easier. Go to www.tacanow.org and check out the GF-CF diet section. They will help you on what to do.

You know that most vaccines are 'grown' in eggs, right? Please stop all vaccinations as this is probably what caused the egg allergy in the first place.

You may email me directly for more help on foods and diet. [email protected]____.com

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E.H.

answers from Los Angeles on

My daughter developed an allergy (with hives) to eggs at about 18 months or so. Prior to that she ate eggs without a problem. She also had ezcema and other non-food allergies. She also has an intolerance for dairy products. We re-introduced it periodically, but mostly in foods like french toast and fried rice.

She's 12 now, can eat foods with eggs in it, but not the eggs itself (like a hard boiled or scrambled eggs.) She can do something like pancakes once or twice a week, but not consistently everyday.

I found using egg substitute for things like french toast seem easier on her stomach.

The weird thing is that while I was pregnant with her, I couldn't eat eggs, I felt nauseous afterwards. After her birth, I couldn't eat eggs often without getting ill.

Find out for sure if it's an allergy or an intolerance. With an intolerance, you can take some thing for it as well as not eat it so often.

Good luck!

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L.A.

answers from Los Angeles on

At 15 months we found out my son was allergic to eggs and peanuts by way of vomiting and then hives all over his body. It was a mild allergy to both and his peditrician advised he would most likely grow out of the egg allergy and hopefully the peanut allergy. We kept him away from all concentrated egg forms like scrambled eggs, mayo/salad dressing and egg bagels. I did notice he had no reaction to baked stuff like cookies, cakes, pancakes, french toast or the organic eggs and egg beaters. My Dad, who was raised on a chicken farm, did bring up a good point that chickens are stocked with steriods to lay eggs consistantly and it may be the steriods he's having the reaction to. My son is now three and has very little to no reaction to eggs and I beleive with time it'll all go way. As for the peanuts I have not ventured that far for he refuses to eat peanut butter.

L.

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C.C.

answers from Los Angeles on

Hi D.,
my little girl is two. She is allergic to so much it's hard to list. Milk, egg, wheat,nuts all the main staples. It is very hard to feed her. She is also allergic to hot and cold. My husband has lot's of food allergys and did not grow out of them. I had some that i did. I hear that egg and milk allergys you tend to grow out of. Bj's has a good egg substitute. Probiotic seems to help. If you have another child in the future you start taking it in your 7th month some studys say it decreases asthma and allergys by 39% i wish i had known this before madison was born. We also past asthma on to her. I don't have trouble with asthma anymore unless i'm sick and i had severe asthma as a child. My husband still has trouble. Madison is on 4mg a day of singulair and has not had any asthma related problems since. I wish i could say that for her rash she has every day. You can also do alot to your house for asthma. They help alot. I'm sure this is more then you were looking for. Hope it helps. Bj's is next to walmart on bear valley.
C.

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D.M.

answers from Los Angeles on

My son was allergic to eggs at 2 years old, also. He will be turning 3 at the end of this month, and I am happy to report, he is no longer allergic to eggs. My pediatrician told us egg allergies are very common, and that the majority of them go away once the child is 3 or 4 years old.

Godd luck!

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E.C.

answers from Los Angeles on

Hi D.,

I am a certified nutritionist and have a supplement that may benefit and help your son. It's called Natural Cellular Defense (zeolite). It helps neutralize your bodies ph and get rid of highly toxic materials, i.e mercury, fluoride, etc. which are the cause of many many health issues including asthma and allergies. I know that this has helped others with their asthma and allergies. I would love to share more with you, feel free to give me a call ###-###-#### or email [email protected]____.com Best Wishes
E. :)

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L.Z.

answers from Los Angeles on

Hello D.,
We also found out my son was also allergic to eggs at about the same age your son's was. We already knew he was allergic to milk and all other dairy products so his doctor suggested allergy testing. This was helpful as we found out about other allergies he had and how severe each one was on a scale of 1 to 5. This was done with a blood test. So we were able to gather from the test that most allergies at a level 3 or below he would likely grow out of eventually. He is now 6 1/2 and he must have grown out of the allergy to eggs in the last year, because he happened to try them about half a year ago and no more hives broke out on his body. During that time though, we would either give him egg substitutes which are healthier anyway, or just egg whites. Seems the egg allergy mostly tends to be to the egg yolk itself.

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L.A.

answers from Los Angeles on

First, D., let me say that you are a wonderful, blessed woman of strength and please pass on to your husband our gratitude (and to you, as well). Allergies are a funny thing as there are so many factors. I've had students in the past who've grown out of a variety of allergies and others who haven't. Sometimes the allergies become less intense over time, too. I do have a nephew who is almost eight years old who still has his egg allergy. The good news is, after awhile, you get used to the foods your son is able to have and that makes it easier. It's just remembering to inquire if you're at a restaurant.
Your son will grow up to be such an inspiration to so many people. Good luck with everything. Keep that great positive attitude that shows through your words up and ya never know what could happen! =0)
Be strong and laugh often,
L.

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C.F.

answers from Los Angeles on

It is possible for some babies to out grow some food allergies. I have a friend whose 1 yr old was allergic to eggs but out grew it. My daughter was sensitive to wheat but out grew that. However, since your son is already 2, it is hard to know if he will out grow this. With the combination of asthma and eczema, it is actually likely that you'll find he is allergic to more things (not just food) as he gets older. Some people don't become allergic to certain foods until adulthood and for some of these it can be life threatening. For now I would stay vigilant about eggs and keep an eye open for other foods.

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M.S.

answers from Los Angeles on

Hi D.:

Actually, they can now CURE allergies using naet (Nambudripad Allergy Elimination Techniques). I have been cured of many, as have 2 of my grandchildren (and yes, one is a baby/toddler). My naet certified doctor is in Fullerton and I love him. His name is Dr. David Karaba and he is with the East West Medical Group on Commonwealth. He is willing to give a free consultation so that you can learn about this non-invasive procedure and see if it is something you want to pursue.

Best wishes,

M.

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