Medication for ADHD

Updated on March 09, 2010
T.C. asks from Bakersfield, CA
35 answers

My husband and I have recently obtained gaurdianship of our three grandchildren. My oldest is 8 years old and the doctor has decided that he would benefit from medication for ADHD. The medication that they have prescribed is Adderall. I have been doing some research on the internet but would like some feedback from parents or grandparents who have any experience with this subject. Thank you.

2 moms found this helpful

What can I do next?

  • Add yourAnswer own comment
  • Ask your own question Add Question
  • Join the Mamapedia community Mamapedia
  • as inappropriate
  • this with your friends

Featured Answers

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.M.

answers from San Francisco on

Adderall is the first medication my step son was started on when he was diagnosed with ADHD last year. It seemed to work really well. The only problem was they didn't give us the time released tablet and so he was having to take his second pill at 1pm. If I were you, I would request the time released tablet so he/she only has to take one tablet a day.

Good luck,

Jen

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.B.

answers from Sacramento on

I have spessial need child, call me I will connect with many parents whose children have suffered in the past and what they've done to free their children from many simptomps of ADHD. Call me 916 944 46 75. My name is A..

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.H.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi T.,
My son, who is 10, has also been diagnosed with ADHD. The doctors and educators don't know how to handle these children so their answer is to medicate them, thus making their job easier. Not so good for the kids, because they don't know what the long term affects are. Every one has been telling me, since my son was 5, to put him on medication. My husband adamently refuses. There is a lot of alternate methods to deal with this that the western medical doctors don't recognize or help you with because their answer is drugs. I give my son fish oils, magnesium, and limit his sugar and media. This is a very brief answer, but if you are serious go to Whole Foods and they are very helpful. These methods don't make the problem go away, the help to calm everything down. These children have a vivid imagination and are highly creative. Why would we want to stifle that and smother it with drugs?
M., mother of three

More Answers

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.C.

answers from Redding on

First I'd like to say, please keep an open mind about all your options including medication. My son, now 20 and my daughter now 10 both have ADHD. One has ADHD inattentive behavior and the other has ADHD impulsive behavior. The best advice I can give you as a mother/caregiver is that the medications do have side effects but so does living life unmedicated. We have an awesome family counselor that helped relieve some of our guilt when we decided to put our son on medication. He asked us if he was diagnosed with Diabetes would you not give him insulin?

Every medication that we take to treat any illness that we may have has side effects, some worse than others. I watched my son struggle to stay focused and saw the frustration he experienced and experiences when he was/is not on his medication. I'm only an outside observer, I can't imagine what it is like to "live" in his skin. Without medication my son would not have survived through school. I'm proud to say that he has graduated from HS and is attending Shasta. He struggles with accepting his "illness" and sometimes tries life without his meds and always suffers the consequences.

We first started him on Adderall and then tried Cylert. He didn't like being singled out and having to go to the office to take his meds at school. He is blessed with a fast metabolism which allows him to take Metadate CD which is a Control released medication that he takes once in the am and lasts until about 6. It gets him through school and usually his homework. The key is having a doctor who is willing to work with you on trying different meds and doses. Advise the teachers what you are doing and ask for their input, they spend a lot of time with your child.

It's not a crime to put your grandchild on medication, just be confident in the diagnosis. Our counselor Jamie Baudizzon with A.C.E.S (Association for Counseling Education Services) has a test that can be taken to confirm a diagnosis. Through A.C.E.S we are working on establishing a support network to help families like ours.

I always felt alone on my journey, please know that there are many families in our shoes.

Blessings,

T.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.M.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi T.,

I have a child that was diagnosed with adhd many many years ago. I, like Michelle, would caution you when giving your child any medication, even if it is prescribed by a doctor and do your research. Many of these drugs have side effects that are just bad as the disease itself.

I chose, along with my child's pediatrician, not to medicate. Instead, I watched the child's sugar intake, monitored everything the child ate, totally eliminated prepared/prepackaged foods, when they slept and for how long. Everything became regimented and scheduled. When it came time to do homework or household chores I used the timer method. Whereas we would work on a an agreed number of problems/questions and once they completed those they would get to take a small break before returning to complete the next phase. (This is where your patience will come in!)

Part of the problem with adhd children is that when they get frustrated, overly excited, etc. they act out which effects everyone in the household. If one is diagnosed with adhd then everyone has it and so the rules and changes you make should apply to everyone.

My eldest has lived with adhd for 17 years without medication and is currently attending one of the most prestigious medical schools in the country, is an honor student and on the Dean's List. I believe I made the right decision for my child. By providing the tools necessary to deal with anxiety (lots of talking through it) along with a regimented day helped make them successful. In fact I think all my children benefited in some way as they are all honor students attending private universities.

Good luck to you and your family.
Connie

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.P.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi T.,
You have gotten alot of great feed back!
I can give suggestions from a different point of view... At 19 I was diagnosed with ADHD and manic depression... but I was also expirementing with drugs, so after going to therapy for a few years and trying different anti depression and anti psychotic drugs, the doctor did'nt want to put me on adderall because I was already doing speed off and on and He knew and did not want to mix it... as he wouldnt know if it was working or not.. but when I finally got sober and learned about ADHD, it relieved me that it was a condition and I wasnt just different or stupid... I cheated my way through High school and always felt different and couldnt understand the kids that could sit still in class and pay attention and pass tests with out cheating... ADHD was very popular then so my mother probably didnt think of my behavior as an illness but as a rebellious teen ager... I barely graduated High School.
I learned that the medications for ADHD are similar to the illegal drug "speed" in the way they affect someone with ADHD... And it made sense that I like speed so much, because I was able to concentrate, able to stick to a task, and it actually calmed me down... These feelings only lasted so long before I was hooked and then my life started becoming unmanagable... I am now a recovering addict and would never go back to that life.. but I think aderall would work for the right person... My dad, whom I inherited the ADHD from, now at 61, takes adderall... He says it helps him alot... I am not very close to him right now, so I couldnt tell you if I notice a difference in him.
If the doctor suggested it, I would try it and see what happens. It might be the answer to solving failing school. I wish I would have it during my school yrs...
I dont think it will hurt him to try it.. It's better than getting into illegal drugs later in life (not that he would) but I did read that people who suffer from ADHD are more likely to experiment with drugs...
Also, when I learned I had ADHD, I bought a book called " Driven to Distraction" I dont remember the authors name, but it helped me so much to cope with my illness with out getting on medication... It taught me what areas I would get more distracted on and how to learn to sit through a class or church etc... and pay attention... Just knowing I had it, made me aware to remind myself to either calm down or to refocus and pay attention if I would drift off...

I feel like I just wrote a book. I know he is only 8 and it will be hard for him to be aware of such illness, but I will pray that all goes well and you and your family achieve success in overcoming this obstacle in life. People with this illness are highly intelligent, so don't let it stop him from expressing what areas he has talent in.

ok I have said enough. I hope some of what I wrote helped you a little.
Take care.
A. P
Sober Mother of 2 boys, 1 and 4

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.J.

answers from Sacramento on

Be careful about what you read online about ADHD medications. So much of it is just plain inaccurate or false, so listen carefully to the doctors and ask a lot of questions. Also, find message boards devoted to ADHD (iVillage and BabyCenter have good ones), so you don't get attacked for even mentioning medication.

Our son took Adderall for a few days. While it worked great when it was active, as it wore off, our son went into random rages. We stopped Adderall immediately after that side effect came up. Adderall has the nickname of "Madderall" because it can cause the anger issue. However, many people do quite well on it. I believe Adderall is the medication Ty Pennington takes and touts actively in the ADHD community. With medication, it can take a lot of trial and error to find what works, but when it happens, you'll see major life changes. Our son's quality of life improved tremendously on Concerta.

Also, if you haven't discovered it already, there's a really great magazine called ADDitude (www.additudemag.com) that's geared for people dealing with ADHD. A lot of neutral, quality information presented in an easy-to-read format (not dry, medical info.).

Best of luck! Feel free to email me directly with any questions.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.W.

answers from San Francisco on

My nephew started taking Stratera last year for ADHD and has had great success with very little side affect. He is still the same wonderfully energetic kid, but just able to focus more and stick to task. It has affected his appetite a bit, so my sister just pays extra attention to his eating. Stratera is also a drug that does not have to be built up in your system, so if you want to use it during the week only or stop for summertime you have the choice.
That said, I have a good friend who found an "ADHD diet" on-line which cut out all preservatives & food coloring among other things and found it made a HUGE difference in her son's behavior w/out medication.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.M.

answers from San Francisco on

My son was on Adderall for a year or so. It seemed to help with his behavior (he's autistic) but he was very loud in inappropriate times. We were in Germany when a woman with broken English heard him and said, "He has the some thing my grandson has -- Tourettes Syndrome". (His doctor says he doensn't) After I checked on the internet and found out that Adderall shouldn't be used for people with Tourettes, we changed to another medication (He's on Zoloft and Gaunfacine now) and the loud behavior went away. Different medications would differently with different people, but that's something to look out for.

Also, Adderall is a "controlled prescription." That meant the doctor had to write a new prescription every month (they coundn't keep a refill order on file) and every time I brought in the prescription they needed to see my drivers license. I think it a commonly abused prescription drug -- I've read that the street value is $10 - 15 a pill!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.S.

answers from San Francisco on

Dear T.

Please do not put your grandchild on Adderall or any other drug. Any drugs are extremely dangerous for young children. There are two wonderful websites I urge you to check out, just type in ADHD in the search and you will come up with a bunch of articles. THey are:
westonaprice.org and the other is mercola.com

Good luck.
M. S

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.T.

answers from San Francisco on

I have no experience with this but have read about nutrition doing wonders. I would take him to a nutritional consultant or a naturopathic Dr and get him on a dietary plan first. It is much safer and can be really effective! Good Luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

V.R.

answers from Redding on

First of all, bless you for taking guardianship of your grandchildren. You are probably saving their lives.

Our son took Adderall and it worked a little but he was awake from 2 a.m. to 6 a.m. talking, singing, re-hashing Sponge Bob episodes so it didn't really work out for our family. We also tried Strattera and he got too sleepy. We then gave up for quite a while, and we tried all of the alternative methods. No sugar, rigid routines (which we still do) no processed foods, Omega 3's for kids. It all helped but on a daily basis he was exhausted from trying to focus. When he broke down and sobbed after a day camp this summer where he had such a hard time staying focused that other kids noticed, he begged us to try another medication.

We went to the doctor and he got on Metadate CD. He has been on it for two months and the difference is amazing. He's focusing in school and at home, he is happier and there are no side effects. His self esteem is improving by leaps and bounds. Can you imagine always being the kid that is being told to pay attention and singled out to behave??? Very hard on them. The hardest thing to remember is that it is not their fault but they can learn to manage some of the behaviors whether they take meds or not. Seems almost cruel not to try the meds.

Adderall is short acting and leaves the body right around the time school ends. If you can deal with the behaviors at home, and there are no side effects, then you might try it. If you want something more long acting, you can ask about Strattera or Metadate cd. Whatever, you try, make sure you research it on the internet first.

CHADD is a national organization that helps parents deal with ADHD.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.Z.

answers from Sacramento on

I have first hand experience with Adderall. It made my son halucinate really bad. I agree with a lot of the suggestions made 1. get a second opinion 2. get the school to run some tests (woodcock johnson I believe) 3. exhaust all other avenues before you put your 8 year-old grandson on medication. All medications have side effects, be it short term or long term; you want your grandson to live his life to the fullest then be very wary of what one doctor says. My son was diagnosed at 7 with ADHD and I tried medications; he functioned better without the medication than with it. He needed a structured class setting, which is the schools responsibility to provide. The school system suggested he go to this school in Penryn as opposed to a elementary school where we lived; that was a very wrong setting....they don't focus on academics at all. Contact Placer County Office of Education to try to get some assistance with what you can do and what the school should be providing. My son is 17 now and academically behind due to his set back for three years in the school in Penryn. Keep pushing for his rights for an equal education and don't give up!

Good luck and keep us posted!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

P.M.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi,

You might want to try alternative medicine first. Check out www.neurorelief.com We used this for our son who has sensory processing issues and it was extremely helpful. It is also used to treat ADHD.

P.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.M.

answers from Sacramento on

I have a 13 yr old who has been on meds for ADHD since he was about 8. We had to try several kinds & combos of meds., & now he's on 4 things to treat him for possible bi-polar (some of the symptoms are just like ADHD's). He's not a tyical case, & it's been a long tough journey. Everyone has a unique chemistry & set of symptoms, so there's no way of knowing what meds will work without trying them. I recommend you get support/therapy for him & yourself & family if the meds don't seem to help much. I certainly hope things go well for you--please remember to take care of yourself!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

P.W.

answers from Washington DC on

Hi T., I am raising two of my Grandchildren, One of which has ADHD, they perscribed Adderall for Adreauna, but the side effects scared the pants off me. I decided to go the natural route, and found a website called "Natures Remedies", they offer a product called Focus, and another called Bright Start, which I stated Adreauna on, and am already seeing positive results with out the side effects. They are herbal remedies. Good Luck!!!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.J.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi T.,
This is a very difficult subject. I have experience with my youngest who is now 17 years old... we decided not to medicate, but it was a very involved process to define the problem and then develop a solution. Sometimes the medication is necessary - as I know very caring, excellent parents who chose to medicate. Each child is different, and you need to make the decision based upon what you know about your child, and that what the experts are telling you makes sense based upon what YOU know.

I write about youth, parenting and society. My website, Banana Moments (www.bananamoments.com), deals with all the challenging and rewarding subjects of being a parent in the 21st century. Below is a link to a page with a teleseminar on ADD/ADHD the dilemma of medicating or not.

http://www.bananamoments.com/bananamoments_006.htm

Also, if you are interested in receving the Banana Moments edition that features how to help your child rise above the circumstances of ADD/ADHD, please email me [email protected]____.com and I will send it to you.

Best wishes for you and your grandchildren. May all your Banana Moments be rewarding and challenging.

Cheers,
J.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.T.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi T., I am the mother of four boys and I'm Thankful to say that none of them have had to have medication for adhd. I work as a banquet server in SF and was working a medical convention on ADHD. While working I was listening to the speaker and he spoke of adhd in conjunction with sleep patterns. I later saw the speaker and asked him if ADHD can be confused with sleep depravation and he said YES! I would first try to put your grandson on a regular schedule with plenty of sleep. My eight year old sleeps from 8pm-7am. during the school year. I sometimes think that parents and pysicians are to quick to prescribe medication to children when all they need is some consistency, patience, and unconditional love.

M.

p.s try reading to him before bed.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.J.

answers from San Francisco on

If you are in the Bay area there is good support available through Parents Helping Parents. www.php.com
They have a series of seminars/trainings that focus on both behavioral and learning issues that many of our kids face.
It always needs to be a multi-faceted approach that MAY include medication, diet, organization systems, behavioral intervention, increased physical activities etc.
Good luck to you

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.T.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi T. -

My son did a short course with Concerta in middle school, and it helped a great deal.

All of the treatments for ADHD are slightly different, Adderall being the 'most different' of them all in that it is a more complex compound than the others, which are more 'straight' stimulants.

I have clients who swear by Adderall, and others who couldn't stand it, and went back to the pure stimulant type. The bottom line is that none of these drugs is right for everyone, so you will have to try it and see.

Best wishes,

J.

G.P.

answers from Modesto on

My oldest son is adhd, each child is different. My son didn't give any pills time to take affect for good results. My son tried Concerta, Adderall, Seraquel, among other pills. Concerta works up to 8 hours, that was the only one that worked for him.
He made excuses to where he didn't have to take them. Some say the child grows out it by adulthood. My son was tired all the time when he took adderall. Its good to research info on different meds. Concerta does have a website if you decide to check it out. Good luck. G.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.S.

answers from San Francisco on

My 16 year old son has mild ADHD and he's been on Adderall for two years. He takes his meds in the morning during the week and he does fine with his focus at school. He really hasn't had any negative side effects at all.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

V.G.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi T.,
It is wonderful that you are able to take guardianship of your grandchildren - what a big responsibiity but also a joy. My three kids are all grown adults now, but at one point my son was screened for ADD by his pediatrician. He seemed to fit the profile, but we decided not to do any meds and he is fine, now a sophomore at San Jose State University. I do not have any feedback to share on Adderall, but I would like to refer you for further information to:
http://www.insidemangosteen.com/powerx/index-1.html
It is organized alphabetically according to diagnosis (ADD, ADHD) and there were testimonials on how mangosteen juice did benefit some children with ADD/ADHD issues. I have a website
www.referralco-op.com with lots of information on XanGo, the whole fruit mangosteen juice supplement and FYI I have a contest that ends today for a FREE case (4 bottles) of XanGo and a box (30-day supply) of 3SIXTY5 whole food nutrition vitamin & mineral daily dietary supplement - please feel free to enter on my website! Just another tip - XanGo does also have small juice samples (1 oz) - "Singles" - that are great for kids because they contain the whole fruit juice supplement and can be packed easily in a school lunch. I also freeze them for a cold treat that I think is a better alternative to many other frozen treats.

I hope this information helps. I wish you and your family good health and countless blessings! V. G. :o)

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.G.

answers from San Francisco on

You may want to get a book and research diet treatment before going to medicine. Obviously there were problems in his family if he has been placed with you. He may just need a loving consistant home.

I have to agree about the book Healing Children Naturally, Michael Savage. WE LOVE THIS BOOK.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.A.

answers from San Francisco on

I third that motion! My daughter was diagnosed ADHD at 9 and I used alternative treatments other than meds because she wasn't a threat to anyone and didn't disturb anyone in school, she just fidgeted, didn't listen, and had a hard time staying focused. We used behavior modification with the help of a therapist, omega 3-6-9 every morning and no refined sugars on school days. It's amazing what 1 little piece of candy would do to her! Now she's 12 and shows very little sign at all that she once was "ADHD."

We also worked with the school psychologist and her teacher to put together and IEP which enabled her to take longer for her tests and her teacher had her at the front of the class so she could keep and eye on her.

We had a number of other tricks we used to help her along the way that I would be glad to share. Three books that I found most helpful were: "Taking Charge of ADHD," "The Gift of ADHD," and "The Edison Gene." They all had different perspectives on ADHD which helped me understand it more thoroughly and could therefore create ways to work with it rather than against it.

I have such high regard for taking care of your grandchildren! Thank you for being there for them.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.M.

answers from San Francisco on

T.,

How did you end up at the doctor’s office to have him evaluated? Was it the school’s suggestion? Was the doctor a psychologist or pediatrician? If it was not a psychologist I would consider asking for a second opinion from one.

My son was having difficulty in school when he was 8. At the teachers request we had him evaluated and tested by the school psychologist. The psychologist did a series of test to find out why he was struggling in some areas and excelling in others. To make a long story short he has Auditory Processing Disorder....his brain can’t properly process verbal information and/or instructions. Since he can’t process verbal information from the teacher he often loses focus and is easily distracted. The following two new school years I was getting requests from the school to have him evaluated for ADHD because he had trouble staying focused….and because he “taps” his pencil! I finally gave in and we visited his pediatrician. I filled out a questionnaire and had a conversation with the pediatrician. He told me based solely on my answers he would be prescribing medication, but he doesn’t like to do that until a trained psychologist gives a second opinion. Too many other things can mimic ADD/ADHD. In our case, he did not have ADHD; it was the Auditory Processing Disorder that was causing the ADHD like symptoms.

It’s amazing how many friends I know that have children who had been diagnosed with ADHD. Some are on medication…some are on special diets and another taking liquid vitamins. Be opened minded to all the different options and read as much information about ADHD as possible.

Be cautious - Some schools really push for medication because they want the quick fix, it’s easier and the school can obtain extra funds if the child meets the requirements for a resource program.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

B.D.

answers from Sacramento on

I can't say I know the effects of this medication particularly but my 14 y/o grandson was diagnosed with ADHD when he was in kindergarten. He now manages quite well on medication. He has had to change medication several times because his body stopped responding to it. At first my daughter's ex said he would take steps to take him away if she went the medication route. He doesn't believe in ADHD. So they struggled for a year in school with the teacher frequently putting him at a table in the back so he wouldn't disrupt the class. They tried special diets, special vitamins, everything that was recommeded to them and none of it made any difference. So his mother home schooled him for several years. Her home school teacher overseer got him tested and they discovered he can't do phonics. He has to do what we used to call sight reading now they call it all language reading. He was in the 3rd grade and finally learned to read, he caught up 2 years in one but did lose a grade. Finally when he was about in the 4th or 5th grade she got him on medication without telling the dad and he got back into public school. (Dad only sees him every 2 or 3 months) It's like night and day. Before if the girls wanted to watch something different on TV he would be in a melt down on the floor, on the med. he says OK I'll do something else. Off the med he wants to direct his sisters every move, on it he does his onw thing. When he comes back from a 3 day weekend at his dad's (with out med) he comes in the house and asks for his med so he can slow down and have some peace. He describes how he feels off the med as all jumpy inside. He just has to do something or say something all the time to combat the feeling. He doesn't have the normal ability to screen out sights, sounds and stimulation that other people do. The sound of the fan, or the clock or the kids in the other room, or the dog outside or car going by all interfer with concentrating on his homework. I watch the kids (4 girls & him the oldest) twice a week and if I stay late and his med is wearing off, it makes a big difference. Good Luck

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.H.

answers from Sacramento on

ADD and ADHD are disorders of the brain. Diagnosis should be determined through proper testing. The proper testing is not simply observation (although symptoms can be observed). Be sure the doctor has done all of the neurological testing before diagnosis due to the seriousness of the medications.

I am a teacher, and I understand the challenges that many children who are active can present. However, I am always reluctant to medicate a child. There are many strategies that can be used to assist the child to overcome the challenges that inattentiveness and high levels of activity can present. I recommend that you try these along with diet changes before medicating. Additionally, many of the charter schools are less likely to suggest medication, so you might consider that if the school/teacher is pressuring you.

Dr. Phil did a great show on ADD/ADHD. If you are a fan of his you might consider looking the information he provided up on his website.

Also, Michael Savage, Ph. D. has a great book called Healing Children Naturally which discusses ADD/ADHD; his approach is through diet. And there is another book I've heard about from other teachers, but haven't read myself that you might consider reading I believe is called "The Spirited Child."

Finally, I hope you live somewhere where this child can get lots of outdoor play and exploration. I believe he will thrive in a more open environment.

My thoughts go out to you during this time of transition.

J.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

G.O.

answers from San Francisco on

I'd like to share something I just learned regarding sleep apnea: sometimes it is the cause of ADHD behavior. Obstruction of breathing during sleep causes waking episodes during the night, and lack of restful and restorative sleep causes difficulty in concentration and focus during the day. Hyperactive behavior is the child's way of trying to stay awake after a night of restless sleep. So this is something to consider having evaluated when your child has ADHD behavior. Many cases of OSAS (obstructive sleep apnea syndrome) go undiagnosed.
A few symptoms of OSAS in children are: snore loudly and often, sleep with head off the bed or propped up with many pillows, sweat heavily during sleep, have morning headaches, difficult to wake up even after adequate hours in bed, daydream at school or home, bedwetting that isn't outgrown, are irritable or aggressive or have behavior problems at school, have been diagnosed with ADHD, stop breathing or breath shallowly for a short period followed by snorting or gasping or waking up.
This information comes from a brochure published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. As a teacher who has worked with many children diagnosed with ADHD, I'm always eager to find the underlying cause of the disorder. If that can be treated, we can avoid using medications which can have side effects and long term consequences that we might not even know about today.
If you see any of those symptoms in your child, make an appointment with your family doctor and he/she will refer you to a sleep center. An overnight sleep study will record brain waves, breathing patterns, muscle activity and more. You should be able to spend the night with your child.
T., your request prompted me to write the above information for all parents~ now I'd like to answer you specifically. I do not know of that specific medication for ADHD. What I would strongly recommend, and you may already be doing this, is to include a component of counseling for your grandson. Any medication which is intended to modify behavior should be monitored by counseling sessions to support a child's emotional growth, look for side effects of the medication, and to teach a new set of skills and behavior patterns to replace some of the old. And in your case it sounds as if there has been a huge family disruption which must be affecting your grandson as well, so I would doubly recommend counseling. Find a counselor who specializes in children, and who can make the sessions fun for him.
Your grandson is blessed to have you caring for him.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

N.A.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi T.,

I am a wellness consultant and work with doctors that have found natural solutions for this condition with no side effects. If this interests you let me know and I will send you information.

Have a good evening.

N. Marie
[email protected]____.com

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.D.

answers from Sacramento on

http://www.addhelpsite.com/
T.,
Please DO NOT allow your grandson to be given medication! There is a much better way to treat this without taking the risks that are very much a part of the Drugs!!! Read, Read and do more reading. Many children deaths have been directly linked to the drugs used to "treat" this and it is so not worth taking that chance. I took my niece off this junk when she came to live with me and found she was just full of life and hyper active. I followed some of the diet suggestions on the natural sites and today 3 years later she is doing just great! She is healthy and no longer feels "sick" like when she took the drugs! We must stand up to the drug companies and say enough is enough! No more kids on drugs and dying just for them to make a buck! There is not one child taking these drugs that is in need of them! Read everything you can get your hand on and you will find MUCH safer ways to treat your grandson...I will be happy to help if you want. I have a website at the top of this post for the add help site. I can get you lists of reading material for this as well.
Feel free to contact me for my phone number or email if you would like them. What ever you do please dont use the drugs they are soooo posion!!

Good Luck and God Bless
C.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.G.

answers from Redding on

I have been a special education teacher for over 10 years and my advise would be to exhaust all other avenues before medication. I feel that the pharmaceutical companies and doctors both, are overly eager to give out medication. Also, I may add that teachers are often culprits of this as well, it is easier to medicate a child than take the time to deal with the real cause. I am not saying this IS the case but, please review all areas before choosing ANY medication. It sounds like the children have been through a lot and have changed primary caregivers to you and your husband, that is a BIG deal. Please give this 8 year old child some time for adjustment and healing and shower her/him with love as well as having reasonable boundaries, that would be the best medicine in the world

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.E.

answers from Sacramento on

I'd encourage you to try changing his diet before trying medication - my husband is ADHD, and will not take medication. Finally, I changed the food we were eating, and he is now so much better! He can focus, he doesn't panic over small things, and is overall a much calmer, happier, in control person.

We limit preservatives, additives, refined sugar, processed foods, and pretty much anything packaged. It sounds a lot harder than it actually is, especially since there is a company that makes it all so easy. We purchase sauces and spice blends from Wildtree (www.wildtree.com), which was started by a woman on the east coast whose children had specific dietary needs, including ADD. Please check it out - and if you contact the company for more information, ask for Trudy Anderson - she's our rep and is extremely knowledgeable. Also, on their website they have an article that was written about hyperactivity that is really interesting. It's under About Us/Recent News.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

N.C.

answers from Sacramento on

That is scarry that the doctore decided what is best for your grandson. Most kids who are diagnosed with adhd do not have it. Your grandchild has gone through a lot, if he is now living with you oppossed to his parents, and more than likely that is the cause of his behaviour not a disorder. I would get him counseling and see if there are any emotional issues that need to be dealt with before medicating your grandson. I am not in your situation, but I can tell you a boy at 8 years old is suppose to be loud, very active, and have a short attention span. My nephews who are 6 and 8 are always moving around, playing, loud, boys will be boys. Please think hard and do not go with JUST what your dr says. Find out if there is anything else, talk to your grandson on his level before you medicate him. It is so sad that we are giving our kids so many drugs that years ago we would have never considered. Some do help, but most for an 8 year old boy, do not. Good luck with your decision. God bless

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.P.

answers from San Francisco on

It has been proven that there is a direct link between behavior and the foods children are fed. i saw an interesting show on the TV once about one of those 'last chance' high schools for kids who were about to be kicked out of the district for behavior. the principal decided to change the food that was served to the students from the government to home cooked meals made in the cafeteria at the school. the behavior of the students changed dramatically, and the only thing different was the food!!! our bodies are not made for processed foods, which, unfortunately, even includes breads and most cereals. whole foods are the best, and much, much less expensive than all the prepared boxed and frozen foods. i would recommend trying a diet change before trying a synthetic drug that is going to mess with your grandchild's body's ability to balance itself and correctly produce its own hormones. when our bodies are put on these synthetic drugs/chemicals, the body just gives up and symptoms will worsen and/or change to other diseases. know that drug companies hook doctors up with sweet vacations, etc. for them to promote their product. it's so messed up!! i wish i could remember the names of books so i could recommend them, but i see other folks have already offered some resources. although this book is not about ADHD, it is about the importance of whole foods. In Defense of Food by Michael Pollen is fantastic!

good luck and many blessings to you as you begin this new life with your grandchildren. have fun!!

For Updates and Special Promotions
Follow Us

Related Questions

Related Searches