Home Schooling

Updated on February 04, 2008
F.G. asks from Aromas, CA
40 answers

Ok, I swore I was never the kind of mom who could home school but here I am considering it...
I would like to get some pros and cons from any of you out there that have done it. What did you enjoy, dislike, would you do it again, why did you stop?
I will be starting with a 2nd grader and kindergartener.
Thanks!

2 moms found this helpful

What can I do next?

  • Add yourAnswer own comment
  • Ask your own question Add Question
  • Join the Mamapedia community Mamapedia
  • as inappropriate
  • this with your friends

So What Happened?

Well, after much reading from all of your responses, thank you very much, I have decided to give it a go. My husband and I are very excited as are our kids. In fact after having my preschooler home for a month, my first grader insisted he wanted to start immediately and not finish out the year at his regular school. We detailed everything he would be giving up in exchange for coming home and he was on board. I'll keep you all posted. A special thank you to the moms that gave me their personal contact info...you may hear from me in the future. Thanks, F.

Featured Answers

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.A.

answers from Sacramento on

I spout the wonders of homeschooling and the only reason I don't is because I'm single and must work to support us all. If you want an email to talk to my sister and her homeschooling group, I'd gladly share it with you. Her kids are ranging from 16 down to twin 4 yr olds. She has 6 of them and homeschools them all and has all their lives!

sincerely,
C.

More Answers

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.W.

answers from Yuba City on

Oh my goodness. Homeschooling is so wonderful. I homeschooled my kids for 5 years. I pulled them out of public school when they were in 2nd and 4th. We ahd a blast. Everything is a learning experience and they learn so much better when they have fun.

The only con I had was that I didn't have "Me" time during the day while they were at school, but that wasn't so bad. Okay, one other, you have to buy your supplies but I found most of mine online for free.

Pros: You know your kids and their abilities. You can push them and see immediately what needs to be focused on. You pick what they learn; for example, if your child is really into frogs, you can spend a week on frogs - anatomy, general, habitat, etc. Think of all the science and reading they will be absorbing. You can spend extra time on subjects they need more help in and do it in a way that makes them less stressed and more open to learn instead of insisting they do it the same way all the other kids do. There is so much more. Also, on a practical level, there will be no tardies or absences to explain away to the school. You can plan and go on vacation anytime you want and still be "in school." (We went to DC to visit family and turned it into a week long social studies trip.)

There are some great books on homeschooling and excellent support sites on the web. I didn't think I could do it either until I bit the bullet and realized that my kids' education was more important and when my daughter came down with walking pneumonia from stress, I knew it was time. It was hard at first because I didn't know what I was doing but it got easy quick. You just have to have confidence in yourself and keep in mind you are doing it for them.

Oh, and I had to deal with teachers, family, etc., telling me I wasn't qualified to teach my child. Sorry, after seeing what the public school was doing to them, I was more than qualified. When they wanted to learn something that I didn't know, I found someone that did and "hired" them to teach my child. Like learning German. Just know your limitations and understand that it is okay that sometimes someone else knows more than you do and tap into it. :)

Also, I got the whole "they aren't getting socialization." Bah, I was never busier than when my kids were homeschooled and I was at home. We had Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, community gatherings and such. My kids were so social, I wish I had cut it down, but they really did thrive. Look around in your area. We had a group of homeschoolers that met once or twice a month for "playdates" and we would organize ourselves into a group and get school or group discounts to go to the zoo or museums - we'd arrange our own field trips.

Feel free to ask lots of questions and do some internet searches. Like I said, I found 90% of my eduational materials and teacher's supplies online for free.

While my daughter chose to go to high school, she was post-high school on all her entrance exams and has been able to have a fun-filled and exciting time in HS. She is a senior now and president of FHS-HERO, drama, choir and has been accepted to FIDM. Life is good.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.D.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi F.,
I have been homeschooling for 11 years now. My oldest daughter graduated last year as a home schooled student. My oldest son decided to go to school his sophmore year so that he would be able to play sports at the high school level. I also have two still at home, in 3rd and 4th grade.

My kids LOVE being homeschooled. I tried to get my daughter to go to school her senior year, but she felt it would be a waste of time. She graduated a year early and had completed 18 untits of jr. college by graduation. My son had a hard time adjusting to the many personalities of school and to the fact that kids didn't want to be there, (so they made it difficult for everyone else around them). He has since settled in nicely and is enjoying public school life. My little kids feel that organized school would be the worst thing EVER. (Because, believe me, we've talked about it.)

Now that you've heard what my kids think, let me tell you how I feel about it.

I began homeschooling without a long range plan. I wasn't sure if I would continue until my kids graduated or not. It just kind of happened that here we are 11 years later, still home schooling. I started homeschooling because I knew that by bringing my kids home, I would be able to give them a better education and one on one attention. The school in our area was not very good. It was also quite important to me to be the person who shaped my children's moral character. Children that leave the home for school spend 8 or more hours with their peers and another adult. They will only spend a small portion of their day with their family. This dramatically influences their attitudes about many things around them. It also dramatically changes their relationship with their siblings. My children are very close. Especially the younger ones who have never been to school. They are each others best friend and tell each other often. They do have many neighborhood friends that they play with EVERY day, and we belong to a co-op school which they attend two days a week. But the majority of the time they are together. They do not pick up bad language from school, or disrespectful attitudes. They can talk to anyone, regardless of age. All of my children can make small talk with adults, while looking them in the eye. While most kids their age do not bother with adult conversation, because they really haven't learned that skill yet. They are also very secure in their place in our family and in the world around them.

My older kids are self starters and know how to study and learn. This isn't taught in school. Most students don't get it until they are in college, and therefore spend a lot of time in remedial classes. (My oldest is 17 and a sophmore in college living away from home at school.)

With all that said, homeschooling has it's down side. The down side is that you as the mom will have to take this responsibility upon yourself to be your childrens teacher. YOU are responsible. And with that responsibility there are few vacations. You get to take vacation, (a homeschoolers paradise of NO SCHOOL.) But there is little rest and relaxation during the school year. Your children are young enough that you can school year round and take a one month break every quarter. (Highly recommended) You can also take family vacations any time you want, keep up with a little spelling and math while you're gone and they count as school days. (The rule for homeschooling by the way is one hour of organized instruction for each year they are in school. Your second grader would need 2 hours of ORGANIZED instruction, the rest being read to and exploring with books and crafts.) Our family has traveled all over the United States seeing the Oregon Trail, and Civil War battlefields, national parks and colonial monuments, all as school trips learning about history and science as no one else can. But as the teacher I always had to be the reminder to "get your math done", "practice your spelling words". It is truly a J-O-B.

I admit that I am tiring of homeschooling. There are more and more days now when I want to quit. Eleven years is a long time, and I'm ready for some time for myself. But looking back, I wouldn't change any of it, and the gift I have received in the pleasure of my childrens company every day throughout their childhood is priceless. The gift my children have received in one on one mom and dad time, sibling time, and individualized instruction just for their needs, is also priceless. When I look into those little faces, I am encouraged to hang in there a few more years. I would encourage you to try it. There are MANY support groups out there. Other moms and families to come alongside you and support you. Your children will thank you for it later and you will receive a truly wonderful blessing.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.B.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi F.,

I am a single mom with two boys ages 7 (2nd grade) and 11 (5th grade). I have been homeschooling since my oldest was 4. There is nothing better in the world. Unfortunately, three years ago I went through a divorce and had to put my kids in public school. They were there for 3 months and I pulled them out due to some real bad attitudes against homeschoolers at that particular school. My oldest son was humiliated constantly by his teacher in front of the other students. She tried to convince him that he was slow. Wouldn't even allow him to write in cursive because the other students didn't know how. When he was accepted into the GATE program, she said there had to be a mistake. My kids are not super-brains, but they definitely are at grade level in some subjects and ahead in others. So I pulled them out and started homeschooling again. I am lucky enough to have a boss that allows me to work from home so I can do that.

For the parent, it is the most rewarding thing to see your child learn and grow, knowing you are the one that taught him. You can move at your child's pace. If they are not grasping a concept, you can continue to study it until they have it. If they are getting it, they can move on and not have to wait for the rest of the class. The one-on-one time is so valuable in their learning process. There is tons of curriculum out there for you to choose from. If my kids were not doing well with one publisher, I scrapped it and went to something else. The class room can be more relaxed or very strict depending on how you like it. You are free to do errands with your kids in tow and come back to schooling later if you need to. The schedule is up to you. There are so many pro's I can't name them all. There are also many helps out there with sports programs, support groups, and so on.

The comment I get the most is that they can't get enough socialization if they are at home all the time. Big misunderstanding!!! Homeschoolers can get more socialization than a lot of kids. There are so many groups to join with and activities available. Plus they have the added benefit of learning to love spending time with their family. Because of the break down of the family and the forced teachings in public schools that go against my moral and ethical convictions, homeschooling was a must for me. I, like you, never thought I was cut out to do it.

The only real problem I've had with homeschooling is that my kids know how to take advantage of time. They can make an assignment last hours and not complete something if they know there is an activity to be done later that day. You have to be able to give consequences if work is not completed in a timely manner. I've had to allow my kids to get an "F" or "incomplete" if they failed to finish an assignment because they were playing around. But they eventually learn that it is no fun to get an "F". It is also easy for the parent to get lazy, so making a daily plan and sticking to it is helpful.

The other negative aspect of homeschooling is that there are a lot of people out there who don't think it is good for your kids. So you take the chance of being reported and being intruded upon by Social Services. You need to know that homeschooling is completely legal. You should join HSLDA (Home School Legal Defense Association) to protect your right to homeschool. There is also an organization called CHEA (California Home Educators Association) that will give you all the legal info on running your own school, as well as helps to get started. SELAH is an organization of homeschool families that offer support groups in your area. Your support groups can help you find activities and sports programs to get involved in. Also, go on the internet to find printables. Curriculum can get expensive, but at your kids ages, printables are very useful.

I hope this helps you a little. If you have any specific questions you would like to ask me, please feel free to email me back.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.S.

answers from San Francisco on

I don't officially home school yet as my son is too young or school but wanted to offer a resource I access regularly - the blog "Life without School" http://lifewithoutschool.typepad.com I find the insights there thought provoking and comforting, not just on the alternatives to traditional school but on the basic individuality of kids and development.

I also stumbled across via MamSource the Cedarwood Sudbury School in Santa Clara, CA which sounds like all of the freedom of homeschooling/unschooling while still having your kids in the care of other adults during school time each day (for those who have to work outside the home)

http://www.cedarwoodsudbury.org/Our%20Program.html

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.C.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi F.. I'm the homeschooling mom of six kids ages ranging from 17 months to 14 y.o. We've been homeschooling for 7 years now and I would never consider putting my kids into the public school system again. The things I enjoy about homeschooling is everything - the kids learning at their own pace, not having all the peer pressures over petty things that really don't matter in real life, them receiving real life experiences with a variety of people and places, more relaxed life style, the child's ability to focus on what appeals to them academically, and I could keep going on and on. What I dislike - not as much time to myself, very few breaks. I will continue homeschooling until the baby is done with highschool and have no plans on any of the younger kids ever stepping foot into a public school. For more info on homeschooling, go to www.californiahomeschool.net.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

G.W.

answers from San Francisco on

will work if you really want it to....and I hope so.....g.w.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

R.V.

answers from San Francisco on

First what is your motivation for home schooling? There is lots of self sacrifice involved but it is the most rewarding thing we've done with our kids. It is a lifestyle . The cons for me are my house dose not stay clean. We really live in our house and with all the home school supplies and the kids getting more time to play it gets messy. I also have less time and energy to keep up with it because it is so constent.So I'd be prepared to alter your expectations on a orderly house.Also it has gotten challenging juggling two childrens school work. You really have to be flexable and go with the flow. Some days your child will be in a funk and schooling is impossible so to be able to see that and let it go for the day is helpful. We all have our bad days. Also it can be expensive paying out of pocket for classes and curriculum. We have an alternitive school that will give you spending money for approved classes. The pro's I am excited to tell you about, there are so many. You get a real freedom for your family life. You now dictate what is best for your family and when. We take many wonderful guilt free trips during the school year and they all count as schooling. All those extra curricular after school activities now count for school. You get back a ton of family time, down time to just be home. My children have truely gotten to enjoy their childhood and I haven't missed it either. They have developed at their own pace with no presure or judgement. They have many wonderful teachers who teach what they love in very small intiment classes. Art, US history, horseback riding,science, spanish. We are fortunate to live in an area with lots of support. We have the time and energy to go to many wonderful community programs that count as school. I love how home schooling can be very interest orriented. My son loves sports so I have found many sport oriented school lessons around this interest. My daughter loves animals so she dose alot with that. My children enjoy adult company as well as peer. They can play with all ages. Don't try to do it alone. Find a local support progam. My children are extremly well socialized and have learned to value respectful behavior and kindness for others. They have time to voleenter in the community and help a neighbor. To really live life not shut up in a classroom. I'll never regret this experence and time spent with my children. They love it too. Good luck to you.
A little about me, I have a 11 yr old girl, 8 yr old boy and 2 yr old girl. We have always home schooled. My husband is a deputy sheriff and works a swing shift so by home schoolig we are able to have family time. I work from home weaving chair seats. I have education in early childhood development.
let me add that yes children need to learn from each other but they are not always the best roll models for each other.My children encounter just enough undisirable behavior in the class room that that they are learning what is socialy acceptable.I am glad it is only for short periods of time.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

R.S.

answers from Stockton on

I was put in a position of having to pull my son out of school when he was threatened by a boy with a gun. He was in 6th grade. I had a lot of problems dealing with people's opinions and criticism of my choice. I also felt a great responsibility to make sure my son was learning. My son is now in college with a scholorship. I wish I would have listened to myself, knowing I was following my gut, instead of other family members etc. I wish I would have relaxed more, had free days to go to the movies, play a game, whatever. Enjoy your time, find a great curriculum and love every minute of it. My son was also taking music lessons, scouts, orchestra...things he enjoyed. Go with it, you will never regret it. People will tell you they need socialization, etc..3 year olds or any age for that matter, can not teach another 3 year old conflict resolution, etc. That teaching comes from the parents. Enjoy

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.V.

answers from San Francisco on

I worked in the education system for many years & have a very different outlook on home schooling. I have to say, I'm not a fan of it unless there's a serious reason for it...really cruddy school & or district, don't like any of the teachers or staff at the school, that sort of thing. If you're doing it cuz you don't want your kids exposed to possible other influences then I don't think that's a good reason as your kids will have to be exposed to things of that nature & learn to filter things out. Do you have any background in education to draw from? I think that's what sometimes bothers educators about home schooling....that a parent w/no background, education or experience in education thinks they can teach their child better than the person who has all the right education, credentials & experience. How well do yo think you'd do being w/your child all day? Going to school helps teach kids to be independent & make choices for the good or the bad which in & of itself is a huge learning process. They learn to problem-solve...while waiting for help from the teacher, they may be able to figure it out for themselves which wouldn't always be the case when you're right there to help them figure it out. These aren't things that will naturally happen for kids who are home-schooled. Kids really thrive on structure & routine which is a big thing that school provides for them. Do you think you'd be able to offer that to them? My SIL home schooled one of her sons & this was the hardest for them both...she hated structure & routine & couldn't provide while her son LOVED it & missed it desperately. There are so many social kids learn from thir peers while in school. Sure, you can join other home school groups, go on field trips, playgroups & sports but it's not the same as being w/kids every day having to learn to get along w/kids that you don't really like, learning to share your space (in line, at desks,in play), share your supplies, joining in on games during recess & PE. These are the social cues that your child will use his/her whole life & will be at a loss for once they either go back to school or move on to college. Kids also learn a certain amount of responsibility at school...taking car of & track of their things (homework, jackets, backpack, lunches, supplies) & then dealing w/the consequences of losing their homework or forgetting to do it. Can't say that those thing would naturally happen in school. Homework, & other projects done at home due at a certain times also teaches them about deadlines & managing their time, both very useful as adults. Again, not things that can occur while being home schooled. Sorry, I don't mean to sound harsh here but I think these things are such a huge, important part of kids lives & you should think long & hard before undrer-taking this huge task for the next several years. Hope this helps & good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

H.B.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi! I began home-schooling my girls this school year because I was unhappy with the school here. My 12, 16 and 14 yearold learning delayed girls are the ones I home-school. My 16 year old son is still in public school because he plays football. I thought it would be hard, but it's really not and you are more in control of what and how your children are learning. Also, they attend a charter school (Camptonville Acadamy) 3 half days a week for some of their extra curricular activities like art and also classes like math and science are offered as well. Which also satisfies their needs for socialization. Well I hope this helps. If you want any more info feel free to e-mail me. I'll be glad to help. H.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

W.T.

answers from San Francisco on

I've been a homeschooling mom for 15 years. I sent both my boys to public school kindergarten and then homeschooled them all the way through high school. My youngest is a Senior this year. If I had it to do all over again, I definitely would. I tested them with national achievement test every other year just in case I needed proof that they were being educated, and to prove it to my skeptical relatives. (I have a number of professional educators in my family.) They consistently tested to the equivalent of twice their grade level. They took the opportunity to start community college while they were high school sophomores. My oldest became an EMT to help pay for his education at the universty where he is majoring in journalism. My youngest has already taken a number of college business courses for a good head start on his degree in business administration.
I also kept them active in outside activities such as Seascouts and community theater, so no one could say they weren't well socialized. They get along well and count people of all ages as their friends. Many kids in the neighborhood have begged to be a part of our homeschool. I'd absolutely do it all again!
I am a certified math teacher, but I quit teaching in the public schools to homeschool my own. Now I'm back to work in public school part time.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.A.

answers from San Francisco on

Well, I started my son (5) in Kinder this year. I noticed he wanted/needed to start due to his desire for more "input". I researched it and found that for us, it just seemed the best option. I loved the idea of knowing ehat my kids were learning and being there for them. Curriculums are endless and you should be picky before purchasing it, but you can always change later what is not working now. At times my younger ones interrupt (two girls 3 and 19 months)and I am having to be creative on "special" school time toys and activities for them. I also try to fill up the 3 year old's "love tank" before we start with some time just for her (maybe 15 minute of computer time or her favorite books...) I would also suggest the need for joining a group. Some groups cost, but the cool thing is they usually take care of the paperwork filing with the state. Our has monthly meetings, field trips almost every month, testing, support and we even went on a retreat in Oct (for free, just brought food). There are days (yes even with a 5 year old) that I am tierd and would rather be doing something else, like more cleaning, and I know it takes time for me to give to my kids. But I KNOW I am doing the best thing for my kids and will reap the rewards later of the work I put into my kids now! I would not trade this one for anything!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.D.

answers from San Francisco on

First, I think you need to ask yourself why you want to home school your children. Then, sit and talk with your husband about it. I mean seriously talk with your husband about it. Find out what he thinks. If you decide that you want to give it a try, there are LOTS of websites that can guide you thru the process. Also, many churches provide support and group classes for children. Don't let your reason for not home schooling be the fear that your child will become anti social. There are LOADS of anti social children that come out of traditional school settings. Being social is a skill that needs to be practised, but that can be done in a multitude of different settings. Best wishes with your decision!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.V.

answers from San Francisco on

I currently homeschool my 6 year old daughter.
Pro's: I truely believe my daughter is going to get a better education then she would in public school. I know that might sound extreme but it is something I firmly believe in. My daughter reads at comprehends at a middle school level, maybe higher and I know her needs wouldn't be met in public school. We go on field trips all the time, most of our schooling involves going out and experiencing things, not sitting at a desk doing book work. We play a lot of games and do tons of art projects.

You must be EXTREMELY patient to take on the task of being a teacher. It can be so much fun but frustrating at times. The most important thing is to join a good homeschooling program that offers classes and groups so your children still get to have the socialization and friends and be part of a group. My daughter loves her Monday class, her Thursday art class and Friday field trips.

I myself have not been the greatest at reaching out to other parents and I find myself going a little stir crazy at times. It's something that I'm working on!

I highly recommend homeschooling to anyone willing to take on the challenge! I think the Bay Area/Central Coast are very progressive and free thinking places to be so there are LOTS of homeschooling families in this area.

Hope that was helpful!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.C.

answers from San Francisco on

Just so happens I'm a homeschooling mother for my first time this year. My son is five and in kindergarden. We are in a very academicley excellent school district but there are so many things that the school can't teach a child and so many things that a child is exposed to these days that basicley robs him of his childhood. For these and other reasons we opted to homeschool. I have a one year old and a three year old also, so there is plenty of play time and it's amazing what you can accomplish one on one with your child. Even the best schools can't accomadate for the kind of one on one that we can give our children. I also suggest finding a support group of homeschoolers that you can plan fieldtrips, classes, and share curriculi ideas with. There are so many great options for curriculm out there it makes it very exciting. Homeschooling books like those written by Dr. Raymond and Dorothy Moore offer great support and encouragement for the homeschooling parents. What I've witnessed from homeschooling kids is how bonded they are to their parents and siblings, making them very confident and happy children. It's a beautiful thing. Good luck and have fun!!
mamamaria

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

B.J.

answers from San Francisco on

I think a lot of it depends on the child(ren). Some kids do much better with the social interaction and structure of a classroom environment, while others do better with the one-on-one attention from a mom/teacher. I have several friends who homeschool, and love it. Best of luck to you as you make your decision. Only you know your children best.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

B.H.

answers from San Francisco on

We have already raised a 21 year old daughter in mostly public school (private school in junior high). I had to work and, truthfully, I think I would have killed our strong-willed, mouthy daughter, or she me, if I had tried to make her do anything. Our 5 year old son, however, seems to really like homeschooling. I had him in full-time preschool at the private school where I taught when he was 3 and kept him there for a few months after I stopped teaching only to bring him home at Christmas, figuring I could do just as well as they where much cheaper.

We are aligned with Ocean Grove Charter School, which gives us $1800 a year to use from their long list of approved vendors and every 20 school days we meet with an actual teacher who takes down our learning log and makes sure we are on track. We have really enjoyed the year so far and have met several families who also use Ocean Grove, or use other homeschool methods. Both sisters-in-law homeschool multiple children and swear they'd never switch. We are taking things year by year and have made no statements. I am just enjoying my second chance at being a mom. Homeschooling affords us time to go to karate 4 days a week and swimming lessons two days a week without the super-hectic lifestyle we would have with someone else dictating daily schedules and homework. I never did understand what went on in the classroom all day if so much homework was being assigned. Oh, and I don't have to retrain him values taught opposing ours and worry about him being bullied or him bullying because I choose who we play with and supervise as I talk with people I enjoy being with. All in all, so far we love homeschooling. Check out Bob Jones University curriculum. I am just looking in to it for first grade and they have some cool video versions that help kids feel like they are in the classroom. I haven't needed to do this, but there are several secular and religious support groups in the area, some meeting at South Hills Community Church. Good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.F.

answers from Redding on

I have never home schooled my own children even though I have thought about it. However, my good friends across the street home school all three of their children. Recently their daughter, ll years old, decided to go to a private school away from home. I received a letter from her three days ago, I would like to share briefly with you a couple of thngs she wrote to me. "I started classes the day after I arrived and they are wonderful. I guess its easier to learn with other people" And, "Of course I'm happy, I'm happier by far than I have been for at least two years. This is my dreams come true. I'm so busy, and that makes me happy. I don't miss home." I cannot give you any personal advice of my own, so I thought I would just send you the in sight of an ll year old.
Good luck with your decision. C. f

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.H.

answers from Modesto on

Hi, I have 3 children, 2, 5, 8, boy, girl, boy. I'm homeschooling the 2 oldest kindergarten and 2nd grade. I would definitely recommend it - we all love it, and they are doing so well. Its alot of work but it's also so rewarding. It is also much easier than one might think. The curriculum you use is key. Anyone can do it - I am not a teacher either. I have a group of homeschooling mom friends, church friends and lots of cousins close by so socialization in not an issue. There is SO much to say and I can't write it all, but I would love to talk to you if you want to. My email is [email protected]____.com - you can email me and I'll give my home #.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

W.B.

answers from Sacramento on

I am all for homeschooling and am currently homeschooling my 6 year old. I am using a curriculum from Oak Meadow ( Waldorf-based) and have full teacher support if I want/ need it. I love having them at home with me, I like that we can pursue a topic more thoroughly and can travel often. It was/is hard to get into a solid routine, but life happens right along with homeschooling so I don't worry too much as long as we stay on track and get the work done. I want to continue homeschooling as long as possible.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.C.

answers from Salinas on

I have never personally home schooled, but I do have friends and family who have and liked it...
From what I have seen, unless you are a teacher and are qualified, I dis agree with home school. I am a teacher and a mom of 2 boys. I strongly feel children need to be in a learning invironment, with other kids their age.A schedule, daily routines, learning to respect others, how to get along with others, and social skills are very important tools every child needs for their future...
S. c

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.G.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi F.,

(First I have to say "Hi" to Bobbi H.) Well, after researching the home school option for a few years when my oldest was just 2 I decided to jump in and schooled him for a total of 6 years starting with Kindergarten. My boys are now 18 and 22. I don't know if they would agree that home schooling was the best for them but I really believe it was a very positive experience in their lives and kept them a little more protected a little longer from the all the traps that snare and bring kids down these day. It was fun, frustrating sometimes overwhelming but mostly rewarding. I would definitely do it again and feel I would have missed out on so much of their formative years had they been in full time school from 5 years old and up. We had so many really cool and memorable experiences (too many to mention) but the key was that we were always very "plugged in", connected and involved with the home school community in our area. We did a lot of group learning activities, tons of field trips, sports and play groups, etc... I attended annual conferences and a weekly support groups - both large and small. I decided to quit as my older son became more of a challenge then I could handle and my younger son was getting harder to keep motivated. When I began dreading another school day I knew it was time to put them in full time school. The process was gradual in that we went from home schooling (3 years) to part time school (2 days per week w/ other home schooled kid - 3 years) to a small private Christian school (2 years) then to a public high school. My biggest regret was not thoroughly documenting all of the neat things we did and places we went over that six year period so many memories are only in my mind as the boys were so young they have forgotten most of the really unique and special things they got to experience.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.H.

answers from Stockton on

Hi F.,
I home schooled my son for a year in 7th grade, while working full time. It was hard to keep him current with his classmates. The school district did send a tutor once a week to make sure he was up to speed. Once he returned to public school, he was caught up academically, but I found he didn't mature emotionally that year. Although most of us hated peer pressure, I believe some of it is necessary. I believe kids learn conflict resolution, and how to function in society from----functioning in society. I'm not certain why you are thinking of home schooling your child. There are pro's and con's in all things. I hate most of what is going on in public schools today, but unfortunately it mimics most closely what's going on in public life. I would love to shelter my child from all of it, however, if I do how will he function in society when he leaves. It would be like throwing him into the wilderness with no wilderness training or survival skills. That said, at younger ages it's probably wonderful for a period of time. I hope this helps.
T. H

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.S.

answers from Sacramento on

I have a family member who homeschooled her four children, who are now adults. They all have issues with fitting into a regular work or college schedule. They are used to doing things at a very flexible pace, which is not how most jobs work, so they are struggling. Also, they intermitently went to public school, and their fondest childhood memories are of those times in public school.

Best wishes to you and your family :)

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.B.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi F.,
I never thought I would home school until my son was placed in a very difficult classroom situation and we were unable to resolve things with the school, I pulled him out. Now I would not recommend going it alone, that was where I started, very frustrating and you are unclear of your results. There are a number of distance charter schools,ours is an online academy. The part that hooked me was when I first enrolled my son his state test scores were OK some highs no concerns but nothing to write home about, well after completing a full year of the home school materials, his scores jumped between 100 and 200 points higher then the first year. I was sold. Not that test scores are the end all be all, but they are a measure of what the student actually retained, I can watch them learn, I know when they get something and I don't feel like they are subjected to hours of busy work designed for the lowest achieving students in the class. They can move at their own pace, and really grasp the material. We would have gone with private school but we just couldn't afford it... things work out.Things that I dislike are the attitudes of people who think that I am somehow stunting the social growth and development of my own children.Well I will admit, my kids,don't have bling, they don't use slang, they are not trendy. They are sensitive, they appriciate ,art literature,and music. I am not a religious person, but a good person.I feel like I know them, they will be gone all too soon, and I am not a mushy person, I just want to know they are able to function in the real world. I hate that the house is generally in chaos because of some project or because of lack of time to clean, but we are happy. They have clubs, and sports and music and family, do they need to be inundated by children I don't know and have no influence with? I am a rather serious person , and for some the responsibility is too great,if you feel overwhelmed then stay at your traditional school but I urge you to volunteer your pants off, so the teachers know you and can talk to you, I have no beef against teachers, my husband is a teacher. It is a tough decision, but worth it most of the time.
Tired J.
mom of a 10yr old boy, 7 yr old girl, and a 3 yr old going on 25, we started when my son was in 2nd grade he is in the 5th now

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.R.

answers from San Francisco on

I homeschool both of my daughters. We all love it! They are 7th and 8th grade. We are registered at an Academy, they attend school 2 days per week in the ( ISP )Independent Study Program and work from home 3 days per week. I like the fact that they do their labs, tests, ect., in school. They are also getting social interactions, oral presentations, and are in a very, small classroom setting. I feel because of this program, they are much more mature and well adjusted for their age groups.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.W.

answers from Modesto on

I have never home schooled my daughter but I had thought about it before. When I asked her doctor she told me that it can actually stunt their social development. I guess they can get used to being at home and they subsequently miss out on the social parts of being in school...like learning how to meet new people, and communicate. The weird thing is that I know a guy my age that was home schooled and I can see what the doctor meant. This guy is very...well...he doesn't know how to communicate well with people other then his very small group of friends and siblings, and sometimes he even struggles with that. I am NOT saying that this happens to everyone! But it definitely effected him in a strange way.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.F.

answers from San Francisco on

I am a Kindergarten teacher. I realize there are faults with our public school system, but generally this is the best place to get your education. Especially when it comes to socialization. Working with other kids the same age and interacting socially is something that simply cannot be reproduced in the home setting. Your kids might get super grades and grow into wonderfully productive adults, but they will always lack a certain social quality. Definitely commit yourself to being involved in their education, help in their classrooms as much as possible.........but give them wings and let them fly.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.R.

answers from Yuba City on

I did it for eight years beginning with 3 kids ages 6 & 5 and a newborn. By the time I was at year eight I had two more kids. With a good support system, it can be done. Are there other home school moms in your area. Play dates, field trips and homeschool family events are an important part of homeschool success because the encouragement is so great. When the two older ones were ready for high school, we enrolled them in a small charter arts academy nearby. It was a great experience for them and helped them tackle teenage issues with strength because of the bonds we built during the formative years. My oldest is now almost 21 and a Junior at a university majoring in English and minoring in German. Our second daughter is very musically inclined (singer/songwriter) and in management at Starbucks. So we must have done something right.
Our third child is in 7th grade and in Special Ed. and learning and progressing even if not on grade level. The last two a 5th grade boy and a 2nd grade girl are in public school. I have my teaching credential now so I am substitute teaching in hopes of landing a job next year in a really good school where my kids will be on the same campus as me.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.P.

answers from Chico on

I, too, have thought of home schooling. I am not quite ready to take it on, but it does seem to be an option worth trying. I don't know much about the process, but I know of someone else who said it gets old after a bit. And the interaction with other adults for you and children for your kids is limited. I'll be curious to see what others weigh in with.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

B.P.

answers from San Francisco on

i homeschooled my 3 girls many years ago. Their ages were very close to your childrens. It was hard to give my oldest all that she needed as she got to about 5th grade. We lived very rurally. So there was always tons to do. having 3 different ages to branch the age approppriate lessons into to creativity was always a juggle. She had alot of catching up to do when she entered middle school. It took alot of time and more focus and organizational skills than I had. Most of my time as i remember. But we also had many rich great days. 2 of the 3 have college degrees.
Good luck to you whatever you decide will be right.

a little about me:

Mom of 4, I had a son when my youngest daughter was 16. He is 14 now

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.J.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi F.,

I feel children need the social part of school, by home schooling your children will miss out on making friends and just being involved in the social enviroment on a daily basics. Do you remember as a child what you liked most when you went to school. Was it reccess, eating in the cafeteria or just sitting with your best friend. Why deprive your children of this? I work at a preschool with children form ages 3-5 and the most important thing to them is their friends. No matter what anyone says home schooling cannot compare to being in a regular school.

Dottie

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.H.

answers from Sacramento on

F., I have 3 children, one that is in the 1st grade and doing extrememly well in public school, then I have one in Kinder, and one in the 4th grade, both struggling greatly in the public school. We have now found out that it is because they have Dyslexia. They can learn, but the information has to be given to them differently than most children and the current ciriculum doesn't support that difference. So I too am considering home schooling with the same feelings and questions that you have. I also wonder about my child that is doing well... Should I just go ahead and do it with all 3 of my children? She's in the 1st grade but doing everything at a 4th grade level, they won't move her up and she's bored, but I could move her up if I were home schooling her. Not all children fit the cookie cut-out of learning in public schools. We should exchange info. and find out together...

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.B.

answers from Merced on

Well, I am a product of public school, and let me tell you, it was not a positive in my life. My husband also a product of the public school system,had a great public school experience, yet when you ask him specifically what he learned not much, but he was great at baseball! We've homeschooled our 8 children, with 6 currantly at home. Our oldest 2 are now married. dd25 has her master's in psychology and teaching at a community college. dd24 has her BA in anthropology and working at the local women's shelter and will return to get her MA next fall. I can repeat much of what other's have said, but probally what sticks out most is doing what's best for your family at what season they are in. After 18 years of homeschooling, are there days when I'd like to stick my kids on that big yellow bus and forget about everything? You bet! I'd be lying if I said it was easy. It is probally one of the hardest jobs I've ever had, yet the one I love the most. When others try and compare the public, private and homeschooling it's silly to me. Each one is different and each one has positives and negitives. Look long range, whether it's a year or 18 as to what you would like to have into your child's life. Your child can learn limits, self disipline, and many of the other "attributes" some say children only learn in public school. Often those who are to afraid to accept that other parents are able to raise well adjusted, "normal" children via homeschooling are the ones who will only accept one version of life, thinking always their way is best, are the ones who are so negative towards homeschooling. You can do it if you want to. REmember that what works best for your family is what is best for your family. Perhaps you'll homeschool for a season, or never. I guarentee you will not regret that you tried, just that you didin't. Remember the first year or two is the hardest as you're trying to figure out what works. email me if you want. Follow up at some web sites that were given to you. Peace be with you in whatever you decide. hugs~~K.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

B.W.

answers from Sacramento on

I'm not sure where you are, but I too have thought about it. I have 3 kids currently in the public school system, and while I don't have any major issues, it's concerning me. I don't consider myself the 'homeschooling' mom, but there are a LOT of myths that a good friend of mine cleared the air for me. I am checking out the charter schools and some offer the homeschooling, where some of the moms actually do classes with the other kids. They have field trips and all sorts of activities, but you have your days to back. If that makes sense. Bottom line is that you do what is right for your family. I don't recommend extremes where they stay in the house all day. It's difficult to be their teacher and mommy at the same time. Check out what's available in your community, I'm sure there are options that can suit what you want/need. Good luck!
B.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.D.

answers from San Francisco on

I absolutely advise against it. I have not home-schooled, nor would I ever. I am a psychologist and a mom of two school-aged children. I have researched this and I have worked professionally with kids who have been home-schooled and suffered for it. The three main reasons I think it is a terrible idea are:
1)Unless a parent is a certified school teacher, he or she is not remotely qualifed to give children an adequate education in the full K-12 curriculum.
2)Even if the parent IS a certified school teacher, the parent/child relationship confuses and interferes with the parent's ability to take on the very different role of teacher.
3) Kids absolutely need an opportunity to acquire the socialization and life skills needed to function in an environment away from home and family. Grammar school, middle school, and high school gradually prepare a child to function "in the world," with a variety of other people, including authority figures (other than parents) and peers. I'm sorry, but a few hours a week gathering with other home-schooled families for activities, or taking a dance class or martial arts class, or joining a community-based athletic team are not adequate. I have seen the terrible emotional and psychological consequences of kids home-schooled for years, then suddenly faced with high school, college, or working life.
That is my opinion! Good Luck, whatever you decide to do!:-)

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.Y.

answers from San Francisco on

I have just started homeschooling my 8 year old. I have 2 other kids too whom I may consider homeschooling in the future. I have learned a lot about what choices are out there, different philosophies and that sort of thing if you are interested but can't say how it went yet as we are just starting. We are excited about it though!

Please pm me if you want more info.

Good luck!!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.B.

answers from San Francisco on

I suggest reading all of the advise here, and getting books about Homeschooling from the library. I personally feel that EDUCATION and SOCIALIZATION should NOT be part and parcel, but be aspects of a child's life managed free from the other. Why should the pecking order of school interfere with the gift of learning? I think a program of homeschooling, in groups, alone, with tutors and classes and clubs is a wonderful way to go. It requires parents to be VERY active in planning and executing an educational plan, and to know when to get help. Definately seek out a group for the sake of discussion, and make sure to listen to what your child asks for. I agree that kids need to have a separatation in the parent/teacher relationship. Parents should teach what they love, and know, and plan to use the daily world experience for "UNSCHOOLING", while leaving educational discpline to someone removed from the daily family circle. FOR CERTAIN EDUCATION DOES NOT STOP AT SCHOOL, parents can teach their kids all the time, by sharing experiences and talking, without having to be a "teacher." Best of luck! By the way, I love Waldorf as an educational model, and hope to combine a waldorf inspired education with parttime homeschooling in natural history, literature and fiber craft (my fields of interest)

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.L.

answers from San Francisco on

F. I think home schooling is really cool especially at the younger age groups. I believe you can do it as long as it doesn't take away from your 15 month old, who will require a lot of attention also.Go for it and see how it fits in your schedule, if not you can always get them back into public schools. No harm, no foul. (smile)

L. L.

For Updates and Special Promotions
Follow Us

Related Questions

Related Searches