Formula?

Updated on March 25, 2008
S.A. asks from Elk Grove, CA
167 answers

My son had his 9 month old checkup yesterday and the DR recommended we start him on formula right away. James has been exclusively breastfed all his life, then started on solids (which he loves). He now has 3-4 meals a day of solid foods and even weaned himself off of one feeding in the middle of the day (he is still being breastfed, I shuld note). He is gaining 1 pound every month and is bigger than my daughter was at her age. Sicne it was my husband who was at the Dr appt and not me, it's hard to understand why the DR is suddenly recommending this action. James IS growing, has not ever decreased or even stayed at the same weight per month. He just started crawling so the exercise and movement alone could be a reason why he hasn't gained more than one pound this month. I really don't want to start him on formula as I feel it would be taking a step back; isn't the goal to eventually move from breastfeeding/formula to solids?
I need advice from moms who have experience with this, rather than someone who just wants to push formula on me. Should I switch pediatrician's to one who is more supportive of our son's overall health, not specific percentiles? If so, any recommendations for the Kaiser at Elk Grove? What kind words do I tell my hubby to convince to try another way alternate to the Dr's advice? Thanks so much; I've had great ideas/responses in the past and am looking forward to this one. I'm stuck!

What can I do next?

  • Add yourAnswer own comment
  • Ask your own question Add Question
  • Join the Mamapedia community Mamapedia
  • as inappropriate
  • this with your friends

So What Happened?

After talking it over (in more detail with my husband), we are going to up the food intake for the next 2 weeks and see how that goes. The Dr did mention iron and that seemd to be a basis for his recommendation to have more fluids. What really irritates me is that he kept pushing the idea of formula on my husband so that our child would not be "malnoursihed" and have potential "brain deficiecy--only that's the last thing to go" he said.....which is why my husband felt as strongly as he did. After reading to him some of your emails (thank you so much!), I think he's starting to see that WE know our child better than any Dr and we've got to trust ourselves, too. Thanks so much for your advice--I got 150 replies in 24 hours. :-)

More Answers

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

E.K.

answers from San Francisco on

I nursed both my kids for 2 and 1/4 years and went directly from breast to solids. It is time to switch Dr. and go to a LLL meeting or call them for support.

E.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.H.

answers from San Francisco on

Just because you need to read one more opinion! hahaha. Only read a couple of postings, so this might be posted already.

In the last two years (I have both a one and a two year old) I read in a few reputable resources and was told by my PED that breastmilk naturally reduces its levels of iron after about 6 months from when the baby is born. All sources pushed providing red meat to babies starting around that time. We started jarred beef at this age and my kids had excellent iron levels. I also fed them fortified oatmeal that is loaded it iron. We also mixed formula into the oatmeal to make sure they got their iron. That way they got their iron and I was able to continue breasfeeding.

Good luck! ; )

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.W.

answers from San Francisco on

As a "die hard" breastfeeder (I nursed both girls till they were 2 1/2 years old!) I'd stick with that. God made us capable of nourishing our kids, and especially if he is already on solids and eating well, I personally wouldn't make the switch. Can Similac make a better food than GOD???? Anyhow, you might try emailing your physician with your concerns (I'm assuming you can do that at your Kaiser). Just explain that hubby handled the appt. and you were very uncomfortable about going to formula. Hubby probably didn't give the argument that your first child was even smaller at this age -- it could just be that your kids are at the low end of the bell curve, and that is normal for them. Without other evidence of them not thriving in some way, I agree with you -- keep nursing, and maybe add some more solids. good luck and hang in there. Go with your mom sense!!!

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.P.

answers from Sacramento on

Definitely contact the doctor for clarification. I've had success emailing my Kaiser doctors. They always get back to me in a day or two. If you are not satisfied with the response you get, change doctors. Good luck!

Also in regards to the comment below about Kaiser doctors, I think that it was rude and not helpful to S.. Many people have Kaiser because it is what they can afford or it is the only insurance offered by their employer. As with any doctor or service provider, I think that it is up to US as patients or customers to advocate for ourselves in order to get the care and service that we want.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.G.

answers from Merced on

Hi S.,
I say follow your instincts! I feel that too many doctors are overly concerned with percentiles and do not focus enough on the indiviual patient and their circumstances. I also beleive that fat babies fed fast food and ice cream are throwing off those percentiles.

I am the mother of a four year old girl. I have never had issues with weight, nor has her father (other than during the pregnancy :) ).

My daughter gained two pounds between the ages of one and two. I knew she was healthy, growing and ate plenty; just that she was more active and interested in exploring her new world. Our pediatrician was of course a little concerned and even though she stated she was sure our daughter was fine, she wanted to send us to a nutritionalist for second opinion. Knowing my daughter was fine I was leary of taking her to another doctor, but I didn't want to be a "bad mom" so I made an appt. and took her in.

We spent over two hours at the nutritionalist's office answering all kinds of questions related to her diet, activity level and routines. The nutritionalist finally stated he also felt that she was fine, "maybe just a bit of a picky eater". He decided he wanted to do some blood work "just to be sure" and gave us the paperwork to have that done. He also gave us a list of foods they recommended feeding her "to fatten her up", and sent us home.

First I noticed the diagnosis they assigned: "Failure to Thrive". That upset me a bit because my daughter was "thriving" just fine! Then I looked at the list of foods they told me to feed my daughter. The list included numerous items such as "ice cream, McDonald's, butter, whipped cream, etc". In all fairness, there were a few healthier items such as yogurt and advocadoes, but I was shocked at the large amount of junk food on the list. I decided then that I had known my daughter was fine and that I should have listened to my instincts.

I think we are overly concerned with having fat babies. Somehow the doctors are not seeing that fat babies lead to fat children. Why is our obesity rate in children so high? Hmmm?

A few years later my younger sister, who lives half way across the country from me, went through the same thing with her first son. She called me in tears one day stating the doctor was concerned because her son had stopped gaining as much weight (also coinciding with him becoming more active). She said her doctor gave her a list of foods to feed him and that it had butter and ice cream and stuff like that on it. She said it shocked her so she questioned the doctor who replied that yes, she was to feed him teaspoons of butter and McDonald's if that's what it took to get him to gain weight.

Again, why are our children overweight? Could it be the bad eatig habits we have been told to start them off on?

Follow your instincts. If you think there is possibly something functioning improperly in your son's body, then pursue it. If you know deep inside that he is fine, and that you feed him as much HEALTHY food as he'll eat, then believe in yourself.

And, yes, if you can, maybe you should consider finding another doctor that has views more similar to your own.

C.

1 mom found this helpful
Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.C.

answers from San Francisco on

I am appauld at the docor's advice. I nursed my son until 16 months and at times towards the end had to supplement a little with formula b/c my production was slowing down ( this was only on days that I was at work- which wasn't often). But, we too, had a doctor that would suggest formula b/c I had to alter my diet due to my son's alergies to food- but it seemed to be more of an inconveience to others than me. Anyway's, we switched doctor's- he would also make comments about the cloth diapers we used.
If you think your son is not getting enough milk from the breastmilk than maybe think of supplementing here and there- but don't stop nursing all together- mom's milk is the best thing for your kids and the longer you can do it the better. I would also switch doctors.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.O.

answers from San Francisco on

That doesn't sound right at all to me. I would either take him to another ped, or trust your gut and keep doing what you're doing. Is it possibly your husband that is most concerned? You could let him know that the rapid weight gain of early infancy *does* start to slow down, especially as babies become mobile.

If he's still nursing at long enough stretches to get the rich hindmilk, then he's getting plenty of calories. That, combined with serving him healthy solids, seems totally sufficient, so I am really surprised at your ped's recommendation too. are you sure your husband gave him accurate info :-)?

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.S.

answers from San Francisco on

Yes, get another Dr.'s advice.The only way they should recommend formula is if he is not gaining weight.I breastfeed for the first year and then my kids where all exclusivly on solids. Don't loose hope a mothers instints are usually correct and Dr's don't always know everything!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.F.

answers from San Francisco on

I think that is silly too. If he is gaining weight and developing normally there is no reason to introduce formula. It will only deplete your milk supply. I exclusively breastfed my son as well and never had to give him formula. He was always in the 25% and on the small side, but my husband and I are not big people so it was natural. My doctor said that as long as he continues to grow there is no problem. My doctor was very supportive of my desire to exclusively breastfeed and even suggested a lactation specialist when I had supply issues. Before switching, I would just have a conversation with your doctor and find out why she suggested formula. Keep on nursing!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.O.

answers from Redding on

If I were you, I'd definitely start looking for a new pediatrician. If your son is healthy and growing normally there is absolutely no reason to go to formula. You're giving him the best that you can by breastfeeding. I breastfed both of my children for over 2 years, and they're incredibly healthy.
It seems to me your pediatrician is violating the World Health Organization's code on breastfeeding:

"The WHO Code PROHIBITS certain aggressive infant formula marketing strategies, such as:

1. Promoting infant formula through health care facilities
2. Lobbying health care personnel with free gifts
3. Providing free formula samples to new mothers
4. Using words or pictures in advertising which idealize bottle feeding

The Code also mandates that formula ads and labels include the facts about the benefits of breastfeeding and the hazards associated with formula feeding.

The Code does not prohibit the existence of infant formula nor the choice to bottle feed. Instead, it seeks to give all women only pure facts about feeding their babies, free of marketing influence, so that they can make free and informed choices. The Code tries to level the playing field so that the superiority of breastmilk — which has no Madison Avenue agency or million dollar marketing budget promoting it —is not lost in the landslide of formula marketing hype."
You can read more on WHO's breastmilk policy's at: http://www.breastfeedingtaskforla.org/WHOcode.htm

And this web page is a great page to get educational information on breastfeeding. You may want to use this for information in persuading your husband that it's best to keep breast feeding and skip the formula. He may want to check the page out himself. It was a great resource for me with my first child when I was suffering mastitis and I had very little support from family. http://www.breastfeeding.com/

Good luck, and keep up the breast feeding. Don't let them pressure you. Your instincts to feed your baby breastmilk are right on.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.E.

answers from Sacramento on

I totally agree with other points made...
-E-mail or contact Dr. directly to get clarification/ explanation. If this is your first negative experience with this doctor don't assume that their approach to healthcare does not mesh with yours, or that it is all about percentiles.
-Over the past few years Kaiser has consistently won local awards for providing the best comprehensive health care-they DO NOT as a system provide substandard care
-Ask your husband how the conversation led to that advice-maybe he commented about a concern about that mid-day feeding, or a concern about nutrients, or asked for ideas of things to feed your son from a bottle in your absence-since milk and juice would not be options yet-maybe the dr just made a suggestion...
-Trust your gut-if your child is growing at a healthy pace, and getting good nutrition, the ultimate decision is yours.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

H.A.

answers from San Francisco on

If you do not find the pediatrician supportive get another one. I don't see the rationale for stopping the breastfeeding for formula. Get a second opinion. There is so much research which shows the benefits of breastfeeding. Here is one website which discusses it-http://www.kellymom.com/bf/index.html. I'll find some more for you. I have two nephews. One was breastfed for 2 years, the other 7 months. The one that was breastfed longer rarely gets sick while his brother is constantly coming down with a cold.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.L.

answers from Sacramento on

Call your doctor and find out why he recommended formula. He will call you back if he is busy. Also, I am wondering why you would start formula now when in 3 months you will be starting whole milk. If he is eating well and growing I would question the doctor's suggestion.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.M.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi S.,

Breastfeed...he is growing well...and if it is not hindering your personal health, continue. I am not sure what your husbands feeling might be or what might have been said to the doctor...but if formula is not really needed, why use it?

I would call your Ped, and give him a chance to explain...and remember Breast is always best...when its a viable option.

My heart to yours,
T.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.T.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi S.,

I get so frustrated when dr's are quick to assume that a child is going to starve if they're not in consistently in the 100 percentile on every checkup! General rule of thumb - if your baby isnt losing weight & is thriving & not showing unusual signs/behavior, then he is probably fabulous. Golden rule - a mother's intuition is law.

2nd opinions never hurt, especially for peace of mind & if your husband is really siding with the ped. Then it's an impartial jury sort of situation & you can divert the non-conformist label from your direction!

We have 2 daughters. Our first was 29lbs at a year old (at 9 she's skinny minnie) & our second finally passed the 30lb marker at age 3! She' only in the 25th percentile but never misses a meal. We have one pediatrician in our practice that I avoid because he's the invasive test nazi & quick to assume the worst if your kid isnt text book. He probably would've tested our youngest for Celiac's by now. Trust your judgment. You're doing great!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

R.T.

answers from San Francisco on

I would call the doctor's office and have him call you back with his reason for suggesting formula. Maybe he was actually suggesting that Step 2 formula that's kind of a transition between bf/formula and cow's milk? Or maybe he told your husband that if he was concerned it would be ok to start him on formula to supplement. I'd get it straight from the horse's mouth before switching doctors, at least if you like this doctor on other counts. Good luck with your little one and your doctor.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.F.

answers from Salinas on

I can tell you from talking to many people in many places that not all Dr.s are supportive of Breastfeeding despite its proven superiority to formula. I think that without a specific reason or health concern that it doesn't make a whole lot of sense. If your son is eating solids and nursing there is very little reason why formula would be superior, and when I have checked with a variety of professionals when I was worried I didn't have enough milk, I always got the same answer. Our bodies make what a kid needs and if the kid is thriving there is no reason to think otherwise! I would recommend the profalactic solution of contacting the pediatrician to find out why this was suggested and if there is an issue of wrongful recommendation then maybe a Dr. who is more in line with your belief system.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.G.

answers from Yuba City on

Get another doctor. There is no reason to give into the patriarchy. Ever.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.K.

answers from Bakersfield on

I also had to switch my son to formula at 9 months. I was heartbroken. Part of the problem is that when they start on the solids, your milk has to adjust to the lack of producing. It doesn't always work out. I think my problem was that it slacked off too much and my son wasn't getting the nutrients that he needed. It was hard for me to accept, but I did the formula thing. You should be proud for being able to breast feed as long as you did. I know I am.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.M.

answers from Salinas on

First I would call the office back and ask to have the doctor call you back when he/she has a few minutes to explain this to you.

Depending on the answer, then I'd go from there but I see no reason from your description why your son should stop breastfeeding. What's the problem? It sounds like your son is/was exactly like mine and mine kept nursing exclusively past 12 months (we started solids at 6 months) but his main milk was breastmilk until past 12 months. He slowly started having cow's milk every now and then and he didn't really "wean" until I got pregnant and my milk supply diminished early in pregnancy. Other than that I imagine he'd still be nursing and I wouldn't be buying a ton of milk. Why buy the milk when you can get it for free?!

Maybe his iron level was a little low? Formula isn't the answer for that... just increase iron in his diet and get a follow up test 30 days later. we had that problem and it was no problem. I just read up on iron and the best ways/foods it is absorbed. no need for vitamins no need for supplements and no need for formula either.

if you want to stay breastfeeding, i'm sure you can find a pediatrician who will support that - believe it or not, they are not all supportive.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.F.

answers from Fresno on

Hi S......My 13-month-old boy, who I am still breastfeeding, has never had formula. He is a beautiful, healthy baby who is in the 95th percentile for height and weight. God made breastmilk to be the perfect food for your baby. I see no reason why you should give up something that is so good for both of you. Keep up the good work!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.A.

answers from Redding on

Personally, I would call myself and ask for an explanation, then I would consider changing ped's. There is no reason, based on what you present, why he should switch to formula. NONE.

I have a wonderful ped, he's been around 40yrs+, and he is 'open minded' while still very MD based. He would never recommend formula unless under very specific circumstances (and extreme, I might add). I'd say I'm surprised, but sadly I'm not -- there are still many Dr's out there who think it is 'weird'even 'kinda sick' to BF past 1 yr (I had a Dr tell me that once!). Dr' s are human beings as well, and still have their own opinions that may be reflected in their comments, suggestions and even diagnosis.

I'm trying to think of a nice way to explain this to your dh! hmmmm...I can tell you that my girl was, and is, very tiny. She was never in the right percentile (barely 21+ lbs at 24 months). My ped would ask what she ate, and drank. He never once recommended formmula, ever.

Because she was healthy, and thriving -- she is just tiny! If your baby is healthy and alert, responding well and growing, then yes -- his new abilities probably mean he lost a little weight. So normal (!). You know, some ped's also give out recommendations (and that's what they are, not written in stone) because they think the parent wants to hear it.

Gosh, not sure how much I've helped, if only to share with you that you are not alone, and I bet your baby is just fine!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

G.F.

answers from Bakersfield on

S., I'm a mom of 2 boys, one 8yrs the other 3mo. I have had counteless Dr. Apts between the 2. This is not a professional recommendation as I am not a Dr, however You sound like a very competent woman. With that said, dont you think that sometimes we know whats best for our own children? It sounds to me he is a healthy thriving baby. If it were me, I would continue doing what works for me and my family. Dr's dont actually KNOW everything.

But I would also schedule another apt just so you can talk to the doc yourself.( just for peace of mind) or atleast call the doc. I would do this (before switching Docs)And this may give your some insight on what was ACTUALLY said at the visit.

And you can also explain your concerns to the doc. I would wait to say anything to your hubby until after you have seen the doc or atleast spoken to him. As you said your hubbie went to the apt, not you! And since you havnt got to spend much time with your hubby due to work schedules, it sounds like simple mis-communication.

Best of Luck, hope this helps.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

W.H.

answers from Modesto on

Pooh! Never mind formula!! He sounds like he is doing excellent. I'm too annoyed with the "industry" pushing formula on your healthy, active, growing and perfectly normal baby to think of any kind words to persuade your husband. Unless there's more to the picture, or something in your husband's conversation with the dr to lead to this suggestion, there is no need at all to switch to formula.

It could be just that he wants his wife's boobs back to himself. (My DH started gently encouraging me to wean once our son was past 1 because he wanted the opportunity to go away overnight (never happened but!) and have me(well, them) be all his again, LOL. Just a thought. But sounds like your son is progressing perfectly well to self-weaning.

And I digress here but I really worried about weaning my son off nursing but he was totally fine and never looked back. I think it was 15-16 months when the last nursing happened. He is a very healthy, active, SMART little (and I do mean little) Kindergartener. He's only 30 lbs at 5 1/2yo. That's just the way he is (both dad and I were barely 100lbs in high school so why should we expect him to be half that weight when he's just STARTING school? Besides, I'm thankful when I have to pick him up that he's still light)

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.D.

answers from San Francisco on

I don't have any personal experience with a dr pushing formula, but I would suggest calling the dr and talk to him personally and ask about the specifics of his concerns and yours, then I would follow your intuition and feelings and keep breastfeeding and solid feeding your son. I know it is normal for baby's weight t slow down a little as they are moving more so I would not worry too much, and maybe look for a second opinion or check Dr. Sears website, he has lots of good info on babies
good luck

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.B.

answers from Chico on

That is fantastic you get to spend so much time with your son! Maybe he had a growing spurt?? Are you & your hubby thin? I'd wait a couple of weeks & see what happens. Did he start walking/crawling? My children have been underweight & WIC has been helping me to get their weight up. They both had growing spurts & the doc was a little concerned. WIC has helped me much more then the doc. They suggested feeding them Dreyers icecream before they go to bed. It seems to be working. I also give them more snacks before bedtime. I would NOT stop breastfeeding. I'm sure he is fine if he is a breastfed baby. My little one is still nursing at nighttime & she is 20 months! yea....(Sounds just like my kids). If you're nursing your baby that is the best thing for him. Maybe he doesn't like to eat for your hubby?

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.O.

answers from Sacramento on

They are many reasons the doctor could have said to put your son on formula but the reality is if he is 9 months and he has never tasted it he most likely will not take it so to spare the pain email your doctor through the Kaiser website and just get a clarication. I email my son's doctor more than visit with her at the Kaiser at Point West. It takes a day or so to get a response but it is worth it.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

E.H.

answers from San Francisco on

Was it really a Dr. suggestion, or would your husband rather see the weening process begin......sometimes they are a little jealous over the whole breastfeeding thing.....

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

P.T.

answers from San Francisco on

I recommend calling and ask the MD to call you to tell you why he recommends formula. My daughter only gained 1 pound from 6 months to 12 months. She was VERY active and our doctor said he was not concerned. Maybe your doctor has a good reason, if not ask for a second opinion. I nursed both my kids until after their 1st birtdays (and no many people who also nursed for the the 1st- 2nd year) and never put their children on formula. Good luck.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.M.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,
I think you should communicate to your Doctor your concerns and questions. Your concerns are valid and there needs to be some dialogue between the Doctor and patient. I can recall a similar situation where my Doctor recommended for me to supplement with formula and breast feeding because it took me a little while to produce enough milk. I felt a little hurt or inadequate but felt I just needed more time. I was able to later talk to the Doctor after I collected my thoughts and share my feelings. We came up with a plan that worked better for me and gave me (my body) the chance to catch up with the demand of our growing baby. This baby is now a healthy 9 year old! Good luck to you!!
A.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.P.

answers from Sacramento on

No way would I start formula. If he is gaining weight, still nursing regularly and eating solids he is completely fine --especially at 9 months. It isn't like he is a premie and gaining weight is a concern. If you want more info, call your doc and ask what it was that he/she told your husband. I really would not start formula. Keep on nursing --no question it is the best thing you can do. I am a firm believer that mothers know their babies much better than the doc's who see them for 10 minutes every 2-3 months. Listen to your own intuition.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.A.

answers from San Francisco on

Three babies all breastfed for over 14 months. There is no need for formula. I am sorry you have a doctor that formula pushing. How sad that they are so influenced by formula companies...they want him to push you into it so they can make money. I would talk to him directly and question his reasoning, if you are still uncomfortable, I would find someone else that is not so easily inlfuenced by companies. Next it will be medicines, the pharmaceutical companies want your money too...I am so happy that you are willing to get the information you need. You sound like a good mom!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.C.

answers from Redding on

If you feel your son is healthy and of good weight for his age and highth then by all means get a Second opinion also you mingh want to put a call into your current Dr. yourself and ask him why he has made this recomendation. It sounds like your Husband isn't telling you all the Dr. said for you to have these doubts.
Take a day off and both you go to the 2nd Dr. with your son so you both know why the Dr.'s feel that way.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.S.

answers from Stockton on

First of all, you, yourself need to call the doctor and find out his reasons for him putting your son on formula. Then you can go from there on changing docs. There may be a really good reason for it. My sister breastfeed until her girl was one and she went straight to milk. So I see no problem with you doing that but there maybe a underline problem with this. C.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.H.

answers from Sacramento on

You should find out why the Dr. is advising this switch. Drs. don't always know what is best (they are human too). Maybe you could continue breastfeeding, but use formula in the cereal or something as a supplement. Do not do something that you are not comfortable with though. You know your baby best. Sounds as though you child is chugging right along. Keep up the good work.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

N.P.

answers from Modesto on

Hi S.!

Before I would swtich Dr's, I would call the office to find out why he is recommending this. There could be a good reason. Maybe your son is lacking in nutrients, or something. I can understand why you don't want to switch from breast to bottle, but maybe there is an alternative.
Try not to get yourself upset until you've heard the reasaon why.
Good Luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.P.

answers from San Francisco on

My son is now 18 months, but while he was breastfeeding (I stopped at a year) and on solids he never went beyond the 5th or 10th percentile for weight. He ate well and he ate everything I gave him, My doctor never once suggested formula. In fact she suggested FOOD to help add a little calories to his diet. I would call your doctor just to make sure, but if your baby doesn't need formula, why spend the money? If he isn't allergic to milk, try giving him dairy (not milk) products.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.M.

answers from San Francisco on

S., One reason your pediatrician is suggesting formula may be that he/she is concerned about your son's iron intake. They typically check for iron around 10 months, and if it is low, they will recommend formula which has more iron in it. I would also call your pediatrician to verify his/her reason. Hope this helps!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

I.G.

answers from San Francisco on

Hello,
Keep nursing your baby. At 12 months you may transition to cow's milk if you want to. There's no rule as to when you should wean. It's whatever works for you and your baby. Back in the day, before the world of formula, moms nursed their young. Doctors are there to help you if you need medical treatment. It doesn't sound like your baby is in need of medical treatment. Have more confidence in the job you're doing and that will come through to your husband and the doc.
Blessings,
I.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.T.

answers from Bakersfield on

Hi S.,
I'm J.. Perhaps it would be best to talk to the doctor yourself before making the decision - for your own peace of mind.
I know continuing to breastfeed is a way to keep you and your son bonding, but something more important could be happening with your son's health and growth.
I can only imagine how hard it must be for you and your husband to communicate with so little time together.
My son was a preemie - weighed 4lb 2oz the day I brought him home from the hospital. He was not gaining much weight during the next 4 months on just my breastmilk. His pediatrician suggested I put him on a non-dairy high calorie formula and alternate the breastmilk and formula. The results were instantanious! He started gaining weight and catching up to his age group percentiles.
More important, his overall health improved.
My advice would be to make it a point to take your son to the pediatrician with your husband and discuss it together. Then be open to the possibility that your son may not be getting everything he NEEDS from your breastmilk and needs something more.
My best to you and your family in what must be a very difficult situation.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.S.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,

I would call your pediatrician and clarify why he recommends formula. Then decide what to do from there.

Good luck.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.M.

answers from San Francisco on

I think someone already said this, but I will say it again... talk to the Dr yourself to find out his reasons for suggesting formula.

I switched my son to formula at 9 mos because he was not getting enough breast milk and his weight was declining. It sounds like that is not the case with your child. So, ask the questions yourself.

Breast milk is best, but supplementing with formula is not worst thing you can do.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.F.

answers from San Francisco on

I'd ask the doctor why he would suggest formula, since you're not sure. And if you think he's off base, yes, you should switch to a different physician.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

V.R.

answers from Redding on

Can you try calling the doctor and asking him/her for mroe details about this?

Does your husband support breastfeeding? If he doesn't, he may have 'heard what he wanted to hear.' I'd speak to the doctor directly. If a child is gaining weight and has no other medical problems, I see no reason to wean him.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

P.B.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi S.,

I can't even fathom why the Dr would suggest that, your son is fine in weight it seems like, he's not fussy right? Breastmilk is best and if he has started on solids now too, I don't see why changing to formula would benefit him. If it were me, I would call and ask to speak to him or the nurse and find out exactly "WHY" since you weren't there. Sometimes our husbands ( God love them) don't always listen and get all the facts. Just a thought, but I can't imagine any Dr recommending this switch. I have 2 children and my daughter just turned 1, I breast fed both, but her I weaned at 5 months, she was just ravinous and I wasn't satisfying her and she wasn't a happy girl. I switched to Emfamil Lipil Gentle ease and she did fine, but all children are different. I wanted to nurse for a year, like I did with my son. My Dr was absolutely fine with that, but preferred breast milk and encouraged that over anything.P.S. Target has their generic of the Emfamil and it worked the same, almost 10 cheaper too. Hope this helps. P.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.P.

answers from San Francisco on

I'd call the doctor directly and find out what is going on. That seems really weird. If you don't like what the doctor has to say get a second opinion. Unless a baby is losing weight while breast feeding I've never heard a doctor push formula....

C.C.

answers from San Francisco on

I would speak with the doctor directly to ensure you hear the words straight from his mouth. I am surprised to hear that a doctor would recommend formula for a baby who is feeding well on breast milk and solids. If that is really what the doctor is recommending, I might seek a second opinion. I hate to say it but when we were at Kaiser we had some very bad advice from a few of their specialists. We ended up switching insurance because of it. Like anywhere, Kaiser has its share of very good doctors, and very bad ones - we as consumers have to take charge and follow our instincts to make sure we're getting the best advice. Good luck to you and good for you that you are putting your baby's health first with breastfeeding!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.J.

answers from San Francisco on

Children under one year of age really need the iron. Formula has high amounts of iron. Your breast milk might not be giving him enough. Keep in mind it might change his BM's so don't worry he'll adjust. It might not be a big deal since he also has breast milk. Don't try to give him straight formula mix it with breast milk a little at a time adding more as he gets used to it. Then at one year you can start mixing whole mike with the formula to ween him of that. Too bad your Dr didn't explain to you.
Good Luck.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.F.

answers from Chico on

Totally do not use formula. Why would you want to spend money on that anyway?

Dr. might have recommended formula is child's iron was low, but you can get a vitamin supplement for that if necessary. Dr. might also have recommended formula if child was below average weight and your husband became concerned about that.

I breastfed both my sons for over a year each. As you introduce new foods and the cup, you can give your baby water, milk (unless you think an allergy might be present), and there's nothing wrong with some orange juice now and then. Just don't give juice all the time. Baby will breastfeed and gradually wean and take the cup as desired for the next several months.

I've read that formula teaches overeating and leads to obesity. Plus have you looked at the price of the stuff? Boobs and what's in your fridge to drink are just fine.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.B.

answers from San Francisco on

I would seriously question the common sense of a doctor who pushes formula over breast milk unless there was a serious medical issue involved. I would get a second opinion AND contact your local branch of the La Leche League (supporters of breast feeding) at http://www.llli.org/Web/California.html

I nursed my first daughter until after her 2nd birthday (28 months, to be exact.) I have friends who nursed until age 3. I didn't nurse that long because I believe in anything strange. I did it because it was good for my daughter.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.P.

answers from Modesto on

Unless there is a specific (and valid) health reason to switch to formula, I would trust your gut instinct. Most pediatricians recommend breastfeeding until a child is at least one year old. You can always contact your local La Leche League for additional information. Most of the leaders will help you over the phone if you cannot make it to a meeting. They often can give you information to share with your doctor, too. Also, the current growth charts used by physicians are based on babies who are formula fed, not breastfed. Breastfed babies tend to be leaner.

I understand not wanting to switch to formula. I had to supplement with formula due to my daughter not gaining weight (I didn't produce enough milk on my own). I did have a great pediatrician who was very supportive of breastfeeding, which made the experience a lot easier and I was able to continue to breastfeed through the time I supplemented to provide the best nutrition and comfort that I could.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.H.

answers from Sacramento on

My daughter went to cow's milk at 10 months and did fine. She was allergic to all the formulas at the time. Do what you feel is right for you and your child. If your child is healthy and happy you need to do what you feel is right and what you are comfortable with.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.R.

answers from San Francisco on

Every doc is different. My doc said that at 9 mos I could start giving my son milk, that the Pedi. Academy recommends starting milk anywhere from 9 mos to 1 yr. I didn't want to give him formula b/c of the expense and I wanted to cont. to nurse, but he seemed to be nursing less and less. I gave him milk for a few weeks, only with meals and cont. to nurse him. He's doing fine. I think you should call the doc and find out exactly why formula. Also, remember, docs give advice, which you can take or not. I've read many books and read a lot of these messages and I make decisions based on what I think is best for my children.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

F.T.

answers from San Francisco on

DO NOT DO FORMULA!!! Especially if you are and have been successfully breastfeeding. It is incredibly inferior to your milk. It is difficult to digest and can contribute to reduced immune dysfunction immediately but also long-term. Your baby sounds like he's gaining regular weight. I'd change pediatricians pronto. Any doctor that would make that recommendation in your situation is overlooking so many basic needs: ongoing immune boost from Mother's milk, beautifully designed digestive enzymes uniquely created for your child, bonding and skin to skin contact.
I could go on and on. It won't be long before you can't even hold your baby, he'll be so busy and too big. Enjoy this time now. Perhaps your husband wants more closeness with your child. That can be created without taking away from what you and your child already have.

*You might consult or get familiar with the publication Mothering Magazine or go to their site mothering.com. An excellent resource. Don't forget to go with your gut instincts. NO ONE knows more about your baby's needs than you. Trust yourself.

F.
mother of 7 1/2 year old girl. Nursed well into toddlerhood. It happened gradually and ended with a nightly 30 second session right before I we kissed "good night".

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.A.

answers from San Francisco on

O.k. i would call the dr and ask if this is true. If your baby is growing, than you should not worry! Trust me! Been there! I hated when the dr said that my daughter was not gaining and eating enough. So, if you know that your son is doing great! Then, don't let that bother you.
If you feel that changing dr is what you want to do, then do so. I had to change my daughter's dr cuz she was very hard to understand and was downing about my daughter's weight!
I have only been to Kaiser in Redwood City, but I know that they do great! I had Kaiser until my husband switch health care provider. Kaiser is great!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.P.

answers from Sacramento on

I wish I could have breastfed my daughter that long. I have always heard breastmilk is best. Since my daughter was on formula, we moved her to regular milk around her first birthday, but I think your way is better. I have a friend whose daughter was still supplementing her eating with breast milk at a year and a half or longer. I would call the doctor yourself and ask why he suggests formula "right away". That doesn't make sense to me.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.M.

answers from Fresno on

Hi S.,

First, have you spoken to the doctor directly? Unless your son is having a health issue, I can not for the life of me understand how switching him to a synthetic product vs. what your body naturally produced just for your son, could benefit him in anyway.

I have four children from almost 25 to 5 years old, they were all breastfeed (I always had supportive doctor's)and throughout that time my doctors always praised me for doing it. I was always told it was the "best" thing for them. Breastfeeding is an extremely challenging choice, not just because of the time the mom puts in, but also because other caregivers often feel helpless. Generally when babies are fussy or unconsolable, moms can put them to the breast and typically it makes them happy little campers, so if baby is fussy and mom's not around it is the other caregiver wishing they could just stuff a bottle in their mouth, thinking thats the answer.

If you have not spoken personally to the doctor to ask her/him directly the reason for this suggestion to switch, I would do so ASAP! If you have spoken to the doctor and are still uncomfortable with what your told, please speak to a different doctor before making any changes.
Good Luck S., I will be thinking of you

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.E.

answers from Salinas on

I think you should take to the doctor to make sure you understand why he suggested formula. It will also allow you to inform the doctor of your child's feedings incase he misunderstood the facts from your husband. Also if your husband is with your son all day he might know behavior that you do not know and explained it to the doctor. From reading your story it sounds as if you are not providing any breastmilk for your husband to feed your baby for the entire day. If i was in your husband's shoes i would run to the nearest store and buy formula since you baby needs either beastmilk or formula and is sounds like he is not getting either while your husband is home with him.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.R.

answers from San Francisco on

S.,
I know that you have had lots of advice. I would talk with the doctor and ask why he is recomending the switch. My youngest daughters doctor wanted her to switch at a 11 months for more iron, but we were unable to get any formula that she would drink, so it was a mute point. I think that trying different formula's that she didn't like is one of the reasons that she won't drink any milk at all and hasn't since she self weaned. As long as your son is thriving I wouldn't try to push formula unless you feel it is the right thing to do, or the Dr, can convice you there is a medical reason for doing so. If once you speak to the doctor you aren't satisfied with his reasons or you no longer feel confetable with him I would then consider switching dr.
Good luck
Amanda

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

G.P.

answers from San Francisco on

Formulas are unnatural food sources. Nothing is as good and wholesome and nourishing as mother's milk for your baby. Your son is doing just fine and is telling you so as he is thriving. YOUR GUT SAYS, "DON'T DO IT. Listen to yourself, you know best. "Formula is a step backward". Your doctor is not in alignment with you and does not support your thoughts on health for your son. FIND ONE WHO DOES. The new doctor will make sense to you and you will get a good feeling in the office and when you leave. You are in charge of your child's health. GO FOR IT. Your husband will follow as you will be clear about your goal!
I have three healthy children all breast fed. The first for 15 months, the second for 1 year, the third for 1 year. My doctor did not suggest going to formula. I would have thought him crazy if he did. My kids are healthy and continue to be so now in their teens and beyond.
GOOD LUCK with your healthy son.
Gale

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.B.

answers from San Francisco on

I agree, call the MD office and get clarity.Our hubby's sometimes don't get all the info or don't remember the nuances of it. Feel free to question why etc and then proceed accordingly. I bet they have a reason for the recommendation. Stand up for what works for you.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

B.G.

answers from San Francisco on

TRUST YOURSELF! You are absolutely right to stay with nursing and not go to formula. More health problems have been related to putting kids on formula than the manufacturers would ever want you to know. "Most infant formulas contain high levels of aluminum and lead and they are likely to be contaminated with dioxins, pesticides or other toxins based on ingredients that include cotton seed oil, sunflower oil and beef tallow. Breatmilk can counteract any possible effects caused in the womb by exposure to toxins, because it contains antioxidants, which help to compensate for the toxic effects of the environment." ("Healthy Mothers, Healthy Kids" by Andrea Frank Henkart, Psy.D., Shoshana S. Bennett, Ph.D., Tom McNeilis, D.O., F.A.C.O.G.)
And with a doctor pushing formula, I'd look for another pediatrician.

B. Geist

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.W.

answers from Sacramento on

Hey S.,
I nursed my Little one for 15 months without ever giving her a drop of formula. I went from nursing to solids, and still nursed in the morning, at nap time, and at bed time everyday. I took her to regular doctor checkups, and she never said one thing about switching her to formula. when she started to crawl, and pull up on things, she actually lost a pound, and the doctor said that's to be expected, and keep doing what I'm doing basically. My daughter is 2 now, and is healthy and active as a regular two year old should be. I wouldn't worry about the formula thing. If you are that worried about it, get a second opinion from a well trusted pediatrician. formula is all fake stuff anyways, nothing is as good, or can even come slightly close as the real thing. I hope this helps, and everything works out.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.K.

answers from Sacramento on

My daughter has Dr. Ewing at south Sacramento Kaiser and he is good. He did recommend tri-vitamin drops for my daughter. Like most have said you should e-mail your doctor.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.G.

answers from San Francisco on

Don't switch to formula. Some Ped's will never get breastfeeding. It seems you son is doing just fine.
You're a great mom and doing a wonderful job.

Edited to add.....
I see someone mentioned that perhaps the recommendation to switch to formula was to provide your son with extra vitamins and iron. Well, Breatmilk is a perfect food. It contains everything a baby human needs to grow. It also changes as the babies needs change. It contains all the right amounts of everything. No formula on earth can compare.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.Z.

answers from Stockton on

when I was pregnant with my 2nd baby, my first was 15 or so months... doctor said to stop breasfeeding... after research and my gut feeling.. I continued to breastfeed (for my 1st child's benefit).. and both children are healthy!!!... 1st baby stopped breastfeeding by the time baby was born... (yeah.. that could have been crazy..and some may think I was crazy for breastfeeding for so long.. but as long as they wanted it... I continued.. it was more of a comfort thing, after 1yr. of age)...

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.R.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,

I don't really participate in Mamasource but I saw your message. I don't know how big your son is, but our son is pretty small for his age--he was just under 20 lbs at his 12 month checkup. He was exclusively breastfed until 6 months then started on solids. Neither me nor my husband are that big, so we (us and our pediatrician) don't find it alarming that our son is kind of small too. He has never had formula. At 9 months, I would think encouraging him to eat more solids would be the better way to get him to gain weight if that is the concern.

Our son has never had formula. He is fine.

He will be 18 months old this week, and he recently just started plumping up a bit. I think he weighs 22 or 23 pounds. The important thing is, he is HEALTHY, smart, meeting all his developmental milestones and then some and having fun being a toddler!

Best of luck to you mama!

L.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.B.

answers from San Francisco on

I see you have alot of replies to read but just my two cents...I agree with all the women here who are disagreeing with the change from breast to formula. I think that breast milk is best and unfortunately for me, I wasnt able to due to emotional issues. The only thing that I would add is that breast milk with all its wonders does not contain vitamin D which the body needs to absorb calcium to make strong bones. I wold buy either TriVisol or Polyvisol available at most pharmacies and give him a dropperful every day until he switches to cow's milk.

Good Luck and keep up the good work

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

N.H.

answers from San Francisco on

It's probably being recommended because your husband is at home with your baby during the day and it could be helpful as a way to soothe/feed or just as a back-up. But if you have these questions, talk to your pediatrician directly to make sure you are both on the same page. I have a 9 month old baby, who I breastfeed, and still pump while I'm at work half-time. I have to say that it certainly has eased the pressure on everyone now that my daughter can take formula (though I still mix in breast milk).

Best of luck to you,
N.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

E.R.

answers from San Francisco on

Call the doctor and speak to him/her yourself. There may have been a miscommunication. Good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

G.J.

answers from Sacramento on

I'm sure your husband might have missunderstood what the Doctor said. I breast fed, and the Doctor never recommended me to give my daughter formula. As you, my daughter started on solids and breast fed less as the solids increased. She never took formula and I breastfed her until she was 13mos, of course it cut down to nights only. She never had a bottle, and went from breast to cup. I think maybe you can talk to the doctor to see what was really said. I also belong to Kaiser, so I know that the doctors have websites now. Feel free to talk to your pediatrician first before you decide to switch. Your the parent and it's up to you what to do with your child. The doctor is just there for advice and to give their opinion. We sometimes think that we have to do everything the doctor says,and every child is different. Only we know our child and what's best for them. Continue to do what you've been doing and that's taking care of your child the best way you know how and what you've felt has been best for him. Good luck and keep up the good work! :)

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.K.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi S.,

I am also with Kaiser EG and I have a really great pediatrician for my daughter. Her name is Nahla Farghalli. You can check out her page at www.kp.org. I was recommended to her by a really close friend and by my sister-in-law, and I think she is just wonderful and open minded.

When my daughter was born she immediately lost a bunch of weight and wasn't re-gaining it, so I had to supplement formula just until she got back up to where she was supposed to be. Then they immediately took her off of it and monitored her weight. They really encouraged me to breast feed and were really helpful with it when I was having a lot of trouble. I hated using the formula, but it gave my poor nipples a rest that they needed between feedings until they toughened up! My daughter was always in the 10th percentile for weight and the 90th percentile for height, and her DR always said she was doing great!

If you don't feel that a kaiser doctor is giving you the right amount of support or answering your questions well then try another! They usually are very supportive of you getting a second oppinion anyway.

Good Luck!

D. and Layla-age 2

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.M.

answers from Sacramento on

Kaiser is generally sooooooooo supportive of breastfeeding. I've not seen a Kaiser Dr yet who has recommended weaning. Actually, I weaned my son a few days before his first birthday and neither of us was ready and we both really had a hard time with it, but I had a weekend trip and it seemed the time. I wished later that we'd found a way to keep it up awhile longer and my son cried and cried when I came back and wouldn't breastfeed. Usually, I think that as long as the Mom wants to keep it up, they should. My daughter naturally weaned around 15 -16mo and we were both ready, but weaning my son early was traumatic for both of us.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

K.L.

answers from San Francisco on

I breastfed my daughter exclusively when she was little (she is now 10 years old). We never used formula - breast milk is best! She continued on breast milk even after starting solid foods, and I did not start her on cow's milk until she was 1 year old. Breast milk provides the perfect nutrition, enhances immunity and brain development, it's free and on-demand - no waiting to mix (or clean!) bottles. Better for the environment and for your baby. Stand firm on your convictions - you are right!

K.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.S.

answers from Stockton on

I would call his doctor and find out why he's saying that. Also kaiser has a way to email the doctor online if you register with their website kp.org. You can ask the pediatrician anything via email on the website or call him to find out why he or she says to do that. If it's a vitamin he's short in like iron maybe you could still breastfeed and give iron supplements? I would definately find out what the deal is. Cuz normally they don't recommend that.

Also keep in mind, doctors are people too and are not always right. Do what you think is right for your child, as you are his Mom and spend a LOT more time with him than the doctor does.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

B.B.

answers from Fresno on

dear S.,

i am a mother of two who were breast fed. your son will be fine on breast milk and solid foods. no one knows your son better than you do. it sounds like you are being pressured and you may want to find a new pediatrician who better suits your needs. remember, they work for you. go with your instincts.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.F.

answers from San Francisco on

Since you were not at the appointment, I would call the peditrician and ask him why. I have had family members who have nursed their children for over 2 years and they turned out alright.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.C.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.
Unless there is a health issue I don't understand why the doctor would recommend changing from breast to bottle. I have two girls, age two and a half and one, and have breastfed both till age one. My pediatrician always supported the breastfeeding. I think you should call the doctor and ask for an explanation, it might be reasonable. If in general you are not happy with this doctor, you might consider changing, but if you otherwise is happy just give him/her a call. If you live in the San Jose area, Patricia Ferrari on South Bascom Ave. is fantastic. She is very direct about everything, I really like the way she just say things the way they are.
S.

G.K.

answers from San Francisco on

I'm very opinionated about this subject, and if I were in the same situation, I would find a more supportive pediatrician. However, you should call your doctor and ask why formula was being pushed. Depending on the answer, you could also let the "advise" go in one ear and out the other, especially if you respect your doctor.

There are MANY MANY MANY benefits (and supporting documents, research, etc) to breastfeeding as long as possible. My son is 16 months old and is still nursing 3 times each day, and frankly neither one of us is ready to give it up. I also know other moms who breastfeed well after their child turns 2. As long as you and your son are comfortable with continuing breastfeeding and he's growing and developing, there is no reason for you to stop. I have a VERY supportive pediatrician when it comes to breastfeeding, and it makes all the difference.

My son was a lot like you're describing. When he started crawling, he thinned out, and now that he's walking, he's hardly gained any weight at all. But he's developing and his pediatrician says he looks great, so I have no concerns when it comes to the decision I made.

As far as your husband goes, I would find a couple of articles outlining the benefits of breastfeeding, especially if it gives benefits for toddlers. If he still doesn't agree, what I had to do with my husband is tell him that it was really my and my son's decision, not his. If my son decides today to stop nursing, then I accept his decision, but I'm not going to stop just because someone tells me to. It's honestly been a joy to be able to provide him with so much for this long.

I hope you gain some insight and just trust yourself as a mom to make the decision that's best for you and your child, not for your husband and doctor.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

R.S.

answers from Sacramento on

Hey S., R. here. I wouldn't stop breastfeeding. You're boy is probably doing just fine. My son's doctor's showed some concern around this time as well but he was also teething at 9 months. If he looses more weight by next check-up, that's when I'd be concerned. Maybe he needs to eat more food during the day?? As for formula I highly recommend Carnation's brand. My daughter used the ALSOY formula from Carnation because she had bad reactions to the milk based formula. Don't give up on breastfeeding. Talk to a midwife... birthstream.com they'll set ja straight! Good luck.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.L.

answers from San Francisco on

First, about the pediatrician question. I would call him up and ask him yourself since you weren't there. I don't know about the Kaiser in Elk Grove, but my parents go to Kaiser in Santa Clara and they are able to email their doctors. It may take a little bit to get a response, but they do get one. You could also call the advice nurse and see if she will pass on a message. Maybe the doc has a good reason, or maybe there was some sort of miscommunication.
Second, since you don't see your son much during the day, I assume you are pumping? Is he getting enough breast milk? If you want to stay with just nursing, you need to be sure he is getting enough. Babies need mostly breast milk until they are about 1 year old, then the transition is to mostly solids. Is your milk supply still good? Is he nursing during the night at all? Sometimes when nursing stops at night (blessed though the sleep is), prolactin levels fall and milk supply does as well.
That said, if he is getting breast milk during the day when you are at work, and you feel it is all he wants, I support sticking it out. If you otherwise like your pediatrician, maybe you could stick it out with him/her as well. It is ok to disagree once in a while.
Good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.H.

answers from San Francisco on

I am a true believer in trusting your instincts. I would advise not starting him on formula and call the Dr. and ask why the formula suggestion? Maybe something was lost in translation. Is he sleeping through the night? If not, maybe the Dr. suggested it as a way to get him to sleep through the night? If you do not agree with the Dr. after you speak to him or her than I would get a second opinion.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.C.

answers from San Francisco on

I believe in breastfeeding and feel if the child is healthy happy and growing they are just fine. My pediatrician insists that I should be giving my breastfed baby vitamins to make up for what breast milk naturally lacks. I think that is ludicrous. So I feed my baby healthy solids (he's eight mos. old) and continue to nurse him a few times a day without the use of added vitamins or minerals. I don't understand why todays doctors think we need to supplement breastmilk. It harkens to the day when they told our mothers that formula was better than nursing for a baby.

You should call the doctor to talk to him yourself. Then you'll know what his concerns are and be better able to address this issue with your husband. Good luck and stick with your gut instincts. As mothers we really do have a special insight to the needs of our children.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.S.

answers from Sacramento on

A word from your local Lactation Consultant. :)

2-4 Ounces per week from age 6-12 months is the average expected weight gain for breastfed babies. This includes babies who are beginning to eat solids. I would seriously wonder why the Dr is recommending formula for a baby who is clearly gaining and growing quite well. It is clear to me that your baby is gaining quite well! I certainly would not be recommending ANY formula supplementation for this baby.

The Doctor may believe the old myth that after 6 months of age that breastmilk is suddenly no longer nutritious and is now water. Those of us who have a clue know that breastmilk does not lose any nutritional value - ever. If he does, this is a problem. If he feels that the baby isn't gaining weight well I'd like to know why he thinks that with your baby gaining the way he is. If he thinks that formula is better than breastmilk then this is a BIG problem...NO formula is EVER better than breastmilk...and Dr's should know this.

I would agree with the other posters who suggested going back to the Dr and first confirming that he DID recommend supplementing with formula (to make sure his wording was understood correctly) and if he did, WHY he thinks baby would need it when he is clearly gaining and growing so very well.

If the Ped is pushing the formula because he doesn't believe baby is gaining well enough (???) or he thinks that breastmilk is not good enough then you have 2 options. Educate him by providing plenty of reference materials (the kellymom.com site is great with that) and/or change pediatricians. Pediatricians really should be well educated on normal infant feeding - which they sadly are not in Med school. Normal infant feeding is exactly what you are doing - breastfeeding and introducing solids as appropriate. Formula should not be introduced in circumstances like yours - you are 100% following the biological NORM for a human. Good Job!

So - you are welcome to call me at ###-###-#### if you'd like more information or simply want to talk about this more. We discuss this issue on a regular basis in my mommy group. (every Friday, 11:30 - 1:30 at Busy Bees Studio at 2336 Fair Oaks Blvd - at Howe) Weight gain, nursing and solids are sadly an area that is greatly misunderstood by many health care professionals.

Hope this helps!

Warmly,
J. Simpson, IBCLC, CIIM
www.breastfeedingnetwork.net

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.R.

answers from San Francisco on

Your Doctor is crazy and giving you dangerous advice. Breast milk is ALL baby really needs and formula companies like Nestle sometimes have unacceptable and malicious ways of marketing their product. Your Doctor is just plain stupid and you should switch right away. Listen to your inner voice about this and do what you know is best.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.E.

answers from Sacramento on

We had a similar issue with my daughter around six months of age, but we have successfully continued breastfeeding and never once used formula. Remember who the mother is. YOU know what's best for your baby, and if he's perfectly healthy, then follow what your heart tells you. Your pediatrician may be concerned about a possible vitamin or protein deficiency, so maybe the best thing to do is give him/her a call and ask away. There are vitamin drops for breastfed babies (formula already includes them) and alternate ways to boost protien in your baby's diet without switching to formula. Our pediatrician recommended Carnation Instant Breakfast powder added to muffins, baby food, etc. It's a new idea for all those pediatricians who are suddenly worried they might get sued if the babies aren't maintaining the same growth/weight curves. Overall, just do what you already know is right and you and your baby will be fine.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.M.

answers from San Francisco on

First of all, did you speak with the pediatrician? Speak with him/her to see what the concerns were. My sons both were breast fed and then went to formula because I my breast milk wasn't enough--maybe not enough calories in it?. A friend of mine also had this problem. There is nothing wrong with formula and solids. My sons had bottles until they were 2 of either formula or milk (once the doc said milk was okay).

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.B.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,
I would call the doctor's office and find out why he/she is recommending formula. If you don't feel comfortable with the answer go for a second opinion. I breastfed my now 34 year old son for 3 years. He was very healthy until a baby sitter started giving him milk without telling me. About this time his father also started giving him milk at home. After that he was constantly on decongestants which caused him to be hyperactive. I'm not saying this is what will happen to you. Just be sure to know all the facts.
Good luck,
D.
Mom and grandma
retired elementary teacher and early childhood professional
CranioSacral Therapist and Pregnancy massage

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

G.B.

answers from San Francisco on

I would call the pediatrician MYSELF and ask these same questions. Where did he fall in the percentiles? I really wish you had included his weight in your question. My son, now 4, was a premature and never even on the weight charts. I breast fed for 14 months and never used formula - my pediatrician recommended I continue to breast feed for the health benefits of breast milk and we both didn't worry about his weight as long as he was healthy - which he was. How long has the Dr. been practicing? What position does the Academy of Pediatrics take? You can look them up online. Remember, your the MOM and your intuition is usually correct.

It is hard enough to continue breastfeeding especially after returning to work. Good job to question switching to formula.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.C.

answers from Sacramento on

I would fire that doctor in a heartbeat. Did he say why? Your son is growing and thriving. What more could a doctor want? Yes, it is the goal to go from nursing to solids.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

N.W.

answers from Sacramento on

I don't understand either...My son was on solids and a cup by 9 mo. He completely weened himself at 13 months!...At 9 Months we were probably doing 2 feeding a day. This may sound weird, but if his lack of having brest milk is really a problem, perhaps you could pump and give it in a cup? I have a friend who did that. Have you called to speak with the Dr.? Maybe he can clarify for you. Perhaps if the Dr. knows just how much your son is eating in solids during the day, he will change his opinion.

Good Luck.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

V.M.

answers from Sacramento on

There is a wondeful article by Dr. Jack Newman titled, "Look at the Baby Not the Scale" that you may find reassuring. You can see it at Dr. Jay Gordon's site, but here is what he says:

'Older babies, 2 to 12 months of age, grow at varying rates. Weight gain should not be used as a major criterion of good health. Developmental milestones and interaction with parents and others are more important. Do not be persuaded to supplement a baby who is doing well. Get help with breastfeeding and use other things besides weight to guide you.'

Also take a look at www.kellymom.com for well-researched articles about weight gain. From what I have seen, weight as a number on a chart in the absence of a medical reason, is not an indication for formula. You might also consider the fact that formula has fewer calories than breastmilk at this stage since breastmilk increases in fat to meet babies' demands as time goes on:

Fat Content of Breast Milk Increases with Time
http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2005/...

And also, the American Academy of Family Physicians says:

"Breastfeeding should ideally continue beyond infancy, but this is currently not the cultural norm and requires ongoing support and encouragement.85 ...If the child is younger than two years of age, the child is at increased risk of illness if weaned."
http://www.aafp.org/x6633.xml

Kaiser has good and bad peds, our ped Dr. Nancy Torres was great even though my bf ds was always tiny, she never ever suggested supplementing. She was in Sierra Gardens in Roseville but Kaiser doctors sometimes move around, so it's worth checking to see if she is anywhere near you - she's wonderful with bf mamas & babes.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.S.

answers from Sacramento on

I breastfed my son until he was about 8.5 months or so, when he was on solids and actually lost interest in breasfeeding. I did give him some formula during the day after that, but only because my milk dried up very quickly after he stopped nursing. I don't think you should put your son on formula, and I don't know why but I've found that most pediatricians seem to lack trust in breastmilk. EVERY SINGLE one of my friends with babies in this state have dealt with pediatricians telling them their babies aren't gaining weight fast enough and that they need formula. I had my baby in Oregon and had a midwife who very much disagreed with the idea of formula altogether. No, my son wasn't super chunky, but he was-- and is-- very healthy. I don't know that you need to switch pediatricians, but maybe you should talk to the doc yourself to see what his justifications were. Stand your ground-- if your baby is healthy and active I don't think you need to worry about a pound he did or didn't gain this month.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.B.

answers from San Francisco on

S.,

I think you are right to question the doctor's motivations for insisting that you provide formula for your son, especially since he seems to be thriving with his current diet. I know I'm biased toward breastfeeding, but that's because it's really the best choice for babies. I know that for many reasons women may not be able to breastfeed and that formula is the best choice for them in their personal situations, but breastmilk provides SO MANY amazing health benefits to not only to your son, but also to you, that to replace that with formula only because it's what your doctor is suggesting, is unnecessary.

Breastfed babies have fewer allergies, infections, lowered rates of hospitalization, disease, cancer, not to mention fewer cavities, higher I.Q. and lowered risk of obesity.

In addition to the weight loss, feel-good hormones, and bonding that breastfeeding provides to mothers, there are real and documented health benefits too. For every year a women breastfeeds, her risk of developing diabetes is lowered by 15%! And a study conducted of nursing women in China found that women who breastfed for two years or more lowered their risk of breast cancer by 50!

With both of those diseases on the rise, it's even more important to protect ourselves in any way that we can. Providing nutritious breastmilk to your baby is a great way to do the right thing for your health and for your sons.

Stick to your guns!

M.

P.S. In the interests of full disclosure, I work with a nonprofit group founded by breastfeeding mothers (one of them me) to address the issue of environmental contaminants in mother's milk. We believe strongly that to not breastfeed is not the answer but that cleaning up our environment and stopping industrial pollutants from invading our bodies and breastmilk is the solution. Visit www.safemilk.org to learn more about what we do.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.C.

answers from San Francisco on

Keep nursing, Momma! God made you that way. He didn't make formula for your baby, and since you are blessed with the milk - keep it up! Some Dr.s are different than others. Every child develops differently. My daughter was 12 pounds at 3 months, my eldest son was 16lbs and my youngest son was almost 20lbs at 3 months. Just as in pregnancy - every woman grows differently (and some Dr.s get so worried about too much weight gain or too little - I got sent to a nutritionist once because of "too little" - in the end I gained EXACTLY the right amount 26lbs!) So, stick with your instincts.

You could call the Dr. to inquire about the recommendation, but it doesn't mean you have to follow the advice!

I breastfed each child for 2 years, introduced solids around 6 months, used breastmilk to mix cereal, introduce cow's milk at 1 year and nursed mornings, naps and bedtime until they were 2 years old.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.G.

answers from San Francisco on

definitely don't give your child formula if you don't want to. That seems crazy to me. Please find another doc who supports you. I wish that I had a reference for you but I don't live near you.

My son is 10.5 months old and is breastfed and eats solids. He didn't even eat solids until 9 months because he wasn't interested. He has been gaining less than 1 lb a month, but is still gaining consistantly. My ped is totally supportive. I as do you, have perfectly healthy beautiful children who don't need some strange manufactured replacement for mother's milk when they are already receiving the best thing possible.

Stick to your guns. Mothers do know best!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

H.K.

answers from Sacramento on

My DR was Dr. Stobie for my children at Kaiser south and I really liked him. I would definitley switch doctors if a doctor told me to switch to formula. If your son is thriving and getting stronger, there is no reason to stop breastfeeding. Maybe you should send a message to your doctor for him to call you and discuss the reason to you. Since you are getting the info 3rd person, maybe there is something your husband said that the doctor misinterpreted when he suggested it, or something your husband misinterpreted. Either way, I would want to get it straight from the source before switching doctors. Good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.T.

answers from San Francisco on

S.,

I am a family nurse practitioner and as far as I know, there is no reason to start him on formula! The food he is getting and breastmilk is all he needs.

I would recommend asking you doctor for the reasons he is advisng the formula. As long as he isn't losing excessive amounts of weight, I would leave it alone for now and watch and see how he progresses. In my opinion, there is NO reason to start formula. Especially if he is active and eating regular meals, don't worry!
Possibly your doctor is obligated to a drug company? Did he give you free formula?

Good luck,
S.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.W.

answers from Bakersfield on

I do not understand why the Doctor is recommending formula. My son started drinking Vitamin D milk around 9-10 months and he's in great health and is rarely sick, of course he is 15 now, but still! I would not go back to formula. Keep him on his solid food and keep up the good work. Good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.J.

answers from San Francisco on

YOU ARE RIGHT!! There is absolutly NO reason a child should not be breastfed........breast is best. I suggest contacting a lactation consultant and get some support as far as changing doctor's she will know who is a pro-breastfeeding doc. Stick to your guns you are sooo right.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

B.W.

answers from Fresno on

Since you weren't at the appointment, it's hard to know what your hubby discussed with your MD. Maybe he discussed how HE misses your breasts and that you've expressed discontentment or something. Or maybe the MD just got a huge bonus from the formula companies so he feels he needs to amp it up a little more to keep those perks coming. There could be so much more underlying that you just don't have the full picture. Babies who are breastfed gain differently than formula-fed babies, although measured right along with them. Remember that babies who are breastfed are getting more than just nutrients, but also mom's immunities to protect them against viruses and illnesses. My kids' MD suggested continued breastfeeding for the first 2 winters of life because of the threat of the flu... even though my daughter was consistently in the bottom 10th percentile (and even fell below it sometimes!), but she followed her own curve and any drop suggested something else was going on (like she had started not feeling well, but the symptoms hadn't hit yet).

I suggest contacting your local La Leche League (this is the link to the Elk Grove's LLL: http://www.lllnorcal.org/groups/ElkGroveCA.html ) and getting the support you need first hand. Certainly if you see that your baby is thriving, then changing MDs may be the best option. Again, check with LLL for MDs that are supportive of breastfeeding- they'll know faster than most. :o) Good luck and happy breastfeeding!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.G.

answers from Bakersfield on

THere is no reason for your healthy son to go to formula. I can't even begin to understand why the Dr. is recommending this. Both of my sisters breastfed children well into two and none of their combined 7 children EVER had formula. They are all smart, healthy children. I suggest trying to find a lactician to speak with and consider a new pediatrician.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.B.

answers from San Francisco on

Hello,
I wonder what are the reasons your pediatrician is giving you to start formula. If your baby is healthy, that doesn't make any sense to me.
My 2 years old son has been exclusively breastfed (for 18 months)and started solid food around 8 months. Our pediatrican recommended giving him some extra vitamins, because he had - at our big surprise- a little bit of anemia.It seems that iron can be missing in breastmilk, but it is definetely far better than formula. Maybe we were not cautious enough, but we never gave him extra vitamins. Our son has been very healthy and strong and is a very good eater.
I think, you should find more information about the reasons your doctor wants you to start formula right away and look for any alternative that would leave you -and your child- satisfied.
Good luck and enjoy your little one as much as you can!

My name is S., I'm 44, live in Berkeley with my son Liam who's turning soon 3, his siblings, Zachary(11) and Celia(14) as well as their father Steven.
I'm also a doula and certified Infant Developmental Movement Educator, but right now I'm mainly a mom.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.S.

answers from San Francisco on

You do not need to start your 9 month old on formula! I have an 11 month old, and she's still on breastmilk and solids. My sitter, and mom of 2, and nanny of many for years and years, asked her Kaiser pediatrician why she wanted her to start on formula (when the doc suggested it, much like yours did, at around the same age), and her doc said that mostly it was for the iron. So, just be sure that your baby is getting enough iron in the solid foods - green beans are great for that. Make sure baby is getting a variety of foods - veggies/protein/carbs at every meal (in that order of priority), varying colors of foods is also a good indicator of a well-rounded diet - and keep breastfeeding! Once baby is a year old, you can start supplementing the solids and breastmilk with regular whole milk.

Why should you listen to me? I've taken nutrition classes with Julie Matthews, a well-known and well-respected nutritionist in the Bay Area, I'm a posptartum doula, and I'm a mom who does her research. Also, by the way, MY Kaiser pediatrician never recommended adding in formula, and my baby is older than yours.

Things to say to your husband: I think the reason why docs recommend this is as a public health issue, for families who may not be as involved in their kids' nutrition as we are. Also, formula companies are prolific in their propaganda and influence on the US pediatric system. Lastly, the World Health Organization's guidelines for health say NOTHING about formula. Here is that link: http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/infantfeeding_recomme...

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.B.

answers from Bakersfield on

DON'T start him on formula unless you look forward to allergies, potential of colic and other intestinal problems. Kudos to you for nursing this long. Your child has been blessed with immunities not received from any other source. I slowly weaned my child after the 9 month mark to milk in a sippy cup so I would not have the hassle of bottles and then needing to wean again from the bottle. Have confidence in your mother's intuition. If you are having an issue b/c "the doctor" recommended it and he is the "professional and should know", then find your local La Leche support group.
Good Luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.R.

answers from Yuba City on

As a mother of five, I understand the demands of taking care of the little ones. I am also currently a teacher and fully understand those demands as well. A 9 month old does need more than one feeding per day of milk. There is milk fat and protein necessary for brain development during the first year. So if you are not able to feed him more than once a day or he won't feed from you more than once, I dare say that he does need formula. There are calories and nutrients that he cannot eat enough of in baby foods to meet his caloric output and still meet the need for steady, healthy growth and brain development. Please do not feel guilty about this. Nine months was the longest I could feed any of my five children. My life got too busy and my milk production went down, so I too had to use formula. I hope this helps.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.O.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi,

Breast milk is the best milk...women have done it since the age of time...the important thing is that your child is healthy and strong...I've known women who have nursed till their child turned 1 year or even older...If you're not having any problems with his health or yours...just stick with it...you're the mom and you know whether you need to do something about it or not...God has given us the instinct to know if there needs to be change that has to happen when it comes to our childern...aside from that formula milk is very expensive...he's being fed...that's all I have to say.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.M.

answers from Sacramento on

First, I would definitely clarify with the doctor why he's recommending this. I breastfed both my kids, and with both they gained steadily until about 6 months, then it was up and down as to the rate of weight they gained month to month. Our office told us this is completely normal for breastfed babies. Plus, our babies were both pretty big when born, over 8 pounds, yet my husband and I are both small thin people. So, I had to change my thinking and realize that at some point their massive growth spurts we going to slow significantly at some point.
Second, my daughter weaned herself from the breast at 7 months and wanted only a particular sippy cup, no bottle. I kept up pumping as long as possible, but finally had to go to formula at about 9 months. I really didn't want to go the formula route, but was close to a breakdown with all the pumping. I have to say, formula wasn't easy for us to switch to...she absolutely wouldn't drink anything but one particular brand. Plus, she gets constipated pretty easily. Having done both breastmilk and formula, I can now say that beastfeeding is easier(once you get past the first few weeks). Added to the health benefits of breastmilk that don't come with formula, I would get another opinion since you're so close to being able to introduce cow's milk. I'm not saying formula is a bad or wrong thing, I just believe that breastmilk is preferable.

Here's just a thought...could your husband have said that formula needs to be started right away with the hopes that beastfeeding will stop right away? I know some hubbies have some issues with the whole breastfeeding issue, so it's something to think about.

Good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.W.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,
I am a postpartum doula, mother of 2 grown children, breastfed until 3 yrs each, although by then they were eating quite well too. They NEVER had formula and are healthy and successful people. If it were me I wouldn't go the formula route either. In my humble experience kids have cycles and sometimes eat alot, other times less. If he is healthy then why the formula? This society is a weight conscious place where its either too much or too little. Personally I would keep breastmilk in his diet as long as possible, feed him a healthy, organic diet and maybe introduce a nut milk, rice or maybe goat milk as long as he wouldn't be allergic to it. Definitely not cow milk! And you know about not giving him honey until after one year old.
I live in Santa Cruz, and you are welcome to phone me at ###-###-####. But if it were me ,I wouldn't give him formula and just make sure he eats when hungry even if its 100 meals a day.
hasta
D.
my email address is [email protected]____.com

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.S.

answers from Sacramento on

I am not one who liked the formula the one time i used it. I have three grown sons, and they did fine without it. However i must admit formulas have improved. What i would do, is call the dr. And ask him, "why do you think my son should go on formula?" then you will have an answer you can accept.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.B.

answers from San Francisco on

I think your gut is totally right. From what you are saying, your son does NOT need formula. Sounds like he's doing great. I don't know doc's in your area...if you otherwise like this doc, then stick with him but don't follow his advice on this. Also give him a call and get the scoop directly from him. Maybe something was lost in translation. If he is still unsupportive then a new doc is a good idea. Remind your husband about the helth benefits of breastfeeding, and of how healthy (and similar) your daugther was.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.S.

answers from Chico on

Wow. I'm at a loss as to why your doctor gave you this advice. It sounds like your baby is developing fine. You didn't mention what percentile he's in at this point but if he's already bigger than your daughter was at 9 months, assuming she's a healthy girl now, I don't see what the alarm is about. There is no ONE size for all babies. It seems weird to me that your doctor would recommend formula at an age where children are typically becoming less dependent on liquid sustenance (breast milk or formula) other than for comfort, which by the way is every bit as important in my opinion. I breast fed both my girls, now 9 and 14, well into their 3rd year, and they easily transitioned from my milk to solid foods around the same time as yours, with no problems. It sounds like your child is doing the same. I'm baffled by this recommendation, unless your doctor feels your child is seriously underweight. My advice is to follow your heart, gut and mind. Your mother sense will guide you.
Believe in yourself!
T.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.M.

answers from San Francisco on

I had to give my (breastfed) daughter formula when she was 10 mo.s old, but that's because she wasn't getting enough dairy and she was underweight. It sounds like yours isn't underweight, though. I wouldn't worry about it. Your baby probably wouldn't even like the taste of formula! If it were me I'd give my baby soymilk or cow's milk, maybe with formula mixed in. My youngest used to drink vanilla soy. SHe liked that flavor better than the formula.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

H.J.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,

I know you have gotten a lot of advice. I don;t know if anyone suggested this yet, but I think you need to talk to a Trained Lactation Consultant. Most Pediatricians do not have nay trainoing in breast feeding! I know this sounds crazy, but it's true. Good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.V.

answers from Fresno on

Hi, I think it is really important to find a dr. that agrees with your style of parenting. such as breastfeeding vs. formula. usually this kind of decision will roll into a difference in opinion about other issues. I breast fed my son for 6 months and gave him formula for 6 months. He was completely off the bottle by 13 months. He has never left the 30%. All kids are different and unless he is not getting enough nutrition through your breast milk, which sometimes happens, you could keep breastfeeding. since you were not there I recommend emailing him to find out his reasons for the change. If you don't agree find a new Dr.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.A.

answers from Sacramento on

S.,
I am a father of an 11 month old boy. My wife is still breastfeeding, and the only time that he has any formula is when he is with me, mom is not around, and she hasn't pumped in a while. Our view of formula is that is not horrible for our child, but it is not first choice. He is also eating solids. While your doctor may or may not be a pusher of formula, the facts of the matter are this, humans have gotten a lot closer to getting all the nutrients into the formula then a few years ago, but they still can't replicate God's on handywork (whether it be breastmilk or solid foods). Unless your son is lossing weight and the DR believes that your son is physical danger (even with that as a matter of fact) I would suggest getting a second oppionion, maybe even from a different doctor office.

Good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.C.

answers from Salinas on

are you adding enough fats, and protiens??
my son who is now 8 years, gained slowly when switching to solids...we only breast fed..no formula..
A good breakfast, scrambled egg with avacado//good fat and protiens...Black beans, and avacado...maybe this will help..
I also have a 2 year old daughter, and my 3rd is due in July..
And you can call the doctor..to get his reasoning too...

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

Y.W.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,
Please get a second opinion! I breast fed all three of my children well beyond 8-months and only stopped that early because I wanted to! Throughout the process, I received nothing but encouragement from my dr. Your dr. could be 'secretly' against breastfeeding and for some reason deiced to impose his views on your husband. Whatever the case your dr.’s comment sounds strange. Especially considering the documented benefits of breastfeeding.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

N.D.

answers from San Francisco on

I have 3 children and have breastfed my children until they were either 15 months or up to 2 years. You should have a pediatrician that supports you on breastfeeding. It's not forumula that should provide weight gain, it's the food/solids. Especially if your son is 9 months old. Maybe you should talk with your pediatrician yourself to understand why he/she made that recommendation. I have a Dr. in Marin who is 100% successful with breastfeeding, and they definitely support it for one year if it is possible for the mother. Honestly it's so good for the child and the mother that there would have to be a very good reason for a pediatrician to recommend going to formula. Hope this helps!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.K.

answers from Chico on

I'd call the doctor myself if I were in your shoes to find out why he reccommends the switch- especially if you don't want to do it!.. Maybe your son isn't getting enough iron or vitamin d- both of which can be taken from sources other than formula. I successfully breastfed both my children (ages 4 and 20 mos) with never a drop of formula until they were a year old, and they are both happy, thriving, and "above average" weight. Good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.B.

answers from Redding on

I would make a call to the doctor yourself to speak with him. Just explain that your husband was unclear about the reason why your baby needs formula and you wanted to discuss with the doctor yourself before making an educated decision. If the doctor does not give you a sufficient answer to put your mind at ease, I would recommend second opinion.
Good luck & keep me posted on what happens!
A.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.E.

answers from Sacramento on

I would call the doctor and ask to explain, maybe your husband misunderstood. After that maybe get a second opinion. Take Care! T.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.R.

answers from Sacramento on

S.~I also have a 9 month old son who is exclusively BFed. I think its RIDICULOUS that any Dr would push formula on a BFed baby. Perhaps your husband did not tell him that the baby was BFed? Maybe the Dr just assumed he was already on formula? Formula fed babies tend to get bigger more quickly than BFed babies too. As his mother, I would make the decision on my own. You know he is healthy and doing fine. Keep doing what you are doing. Just as a comparison, my son was born 5/1/07 anf was 7-6. I BFed him exclusively till 6mos. Then I introduced solids. At 9 mos he was 18-14 which is only in the 25 %ile, but he is fine. He eats 3 solid meals a day of some kind of rice cereal, oatmeal or mixed cereal and a large container of fruit or veggies. I also feed him off my plate. Whatever I am eating, he gets to try and I feed him till he acts like he's over it. He snacks on Gerber Puffs and Graham Crackers. He crawls and just started pulling up about a week ago. I still BF him about 3-4 times a day and 2-3 times at night (mostly for comfort probably). Hope that helps!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

D.F.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,
Perhaps your husband misunderstood the doctor. I know mine have done that. ( I say mine because both first and second)

I am not sure who your doctor there at kaiser is but Dr. Ewing was always great with my kids. He seemed to care about what I thought not what were the recommendations. He was off Bruceville Road. If you believe your child is growing and developing normally and is healthy and happy--forget the rest!I agree with you.Use your common sense. No formula. My children did great on breast milk to solids with breast milk to cows milk after a year. They grew strong, intelligent and healthy. Breast milk is the greatest protein out there, don't let anyone tell you otherwise! It creates a stronger body and also really helps their immune system.

I went through the times when everyone listened to what Dr.Spock said then Dr. T. Berry Brazelton. And, thats all out the window now. If your child is okay. You are doing right by them. But, I would call the doctor myself first and ask exactly what he meant, then if it seems like this person just wants to make sure the tables all match, seek out another doctor.

Oh, and while I have a 1 year old now,my other kids are in college! I have the experience!
Good luck.
D.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.M.

answers from Sacramento on

Hi,
I'm a working mom of two boys 10 and 5. Both breast fed exclusively until 6 mos and started on solids in addition to nursing. Perhaps your husband misunderstood the pediatrician. Breast feeding is the gold standard of nutrition for infants I would either email or call the doctor and clarify. If the doc truly meant to start your child on formula, better get another opinion.

I see Dr Bloom at Kaiser for my kids. He is very supportive of breast feeding and is a great pediatrician.

Good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.C.

answers from Sacramento on

Good morning Stacy,
I would definatley get a second opinion from another Dr. A lot of the doctors are pushing formulas. I breast fed my son and gradually started cereals and then other solids at 6 to 12 months. If you don't feel comfortable you need to be your son's advocate and do the research, like you are now. You know your child best. I don't think it would hurt.
Best of luck to you and your family.
T. T.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.W.

answers from San Francisco on

If your son is getting enough nutrition through solids then there is no need for formula. He should look and function healthy. My son nursed for comfort for a long time after he started eating solids. I noticed a definite decrease in total nursings and my milk after he began eating solids often. He was between 6mo and a year. He still nurses during rough developmental stages. (I swear it helped the 2yr old melt downs because I stopped completely nursing for awhile and then started again after someone passed along the suggestion.) Babies ween themselves at different ages from the breast. There is no need to give formula. If he is still breastfeeding, he is still recieving nutrition from you. La Leche League would have some more scientific explanations about it for you. They are on line or in the phone book.
Really the only thing I could think of that changed in my son was that with solids he needed extra water, and I am sure your son will take in a bottle or sippy cup. Good Luck.-JW

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.S.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,

My daughter was in the 5% range for the most of her life. She's 6 now, and now she's "on the radar". She was breastfed until she weaned herself at 11 months. Our doctor recommended formula because of her size. What we did is we incorporated one bottle a day, but I continued to breastfeed and feed her solids. Honestly, it did not seem to make too much of a difference. She continued to be small for a long time. She's 6 now, and is still considered petite. She's fluctuates betweek 38-40 lbs. She also is healthy, strong, intelligent, and vibrant. Her doctor (the same one) has surrendered to the fact that she's just small.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.H.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,

Leave it to the dad's to not get all the information. I recommend you first contact the doctor and ask him these questions before you go through the hassel of finding a new doctor, your husband may have said something that triggered that response, but again it was irrelevant to him so he has managed to leave it out when reporting back to you. I agree it does seem weird to add that if you are breastfeeding, did you husband maybe say you quit breastfeeding? Again, I'd start with contacting the doctor first and go from there.

Best-
S. H

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.S.

answers from San Francisco on

Both of my daughters began to wean themselves off the breast at about 9 months moving to just one nursing each evening at bedtime, before they were a year old. My pediatrician's only concern was their iron intake. Baby food alone isn't fortified and since most babies don't eat either red meat or enough beans, etc.(Ack, think of the diapers!) to provide sufficient iron, it can be a problem. He suggested that we mix all baby food with some baby cereal (oatmeal, rice, whatever) because it is fortified with iron. This worked well for us. Not only did they thrive and gain weight, the cereal thickened the baby food for less messy feeding and the cereal 'stretched' the baby food which made our budget less stretched!

On a related note my brother's oldest, was not doing well as far as the growth charts and the doctor was pushing formula. What he didn't seem to realize was the genetics of the situation. You can't expect a very petite mother and a father that is only 5ft 6in to have anything but small kids! They switched doctors and the new doc said that as long she was not losing weight, was otherwise healthy, and was hitting her other developmental milestones there was nothing to worry about. She's just a small kid. Now she is a perfectly healthy 14 yr old with straight A's and is a slim 5ft 1in. Same as her mother!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.M.

answers from San Francisco on

S., Hello I am a mom to 3 boys all who were breastfeed, but weaned themselves off at 5-6 months. However, I think you doctor might only be recommending the formula for the iron and vitamins that it provides. It is more then what is just in the solid foods which of course you are right he should be transitioning to right about now anyway. My doctor (who is the head of peds) recommended additional infant vitamins even after we went to formula only. He wanted me to use it until he was 1 years old and on regular milk where there are plenty of vitamins. The vitamin was the Poly-Vi-Sol. It doesn’t taste that great, but my baby took it with no problems. If your little guys doesn’t like it and wont take it put it in his food or a bottle of water or juice if he takes one. If not mix it in his cereal. If your doc has any other reason for wanting him on formula, I can’t think of it and you should of course look into it further and talk about it with him. But other then the vitamins I don’t see any reason why you need formula when you are still breastfeeding. I hope this helps.
~S.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.M.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,
You've received quite a number of responses! I'm a Kaiser member too. I recommend that you email (or call) the doctor and ask him/her to call you. My doctor or his nurse usually call/email within the next business day. That way you can hear the reasoning straight from the horse's mouth and ask follow up questions.

You also asked about what to say to your hubby. While I don't have anything specific that's worked for me, I commend you for thinking about that.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.S.

answers from Washington DC on

Go ahead and email the dr throught he Kaiser website. If you can't navigate that, call the advice nurse ###-###-#### (i'm sure you know that number) and have them send the message for you. I love my husband, but sometimes dad's just don't get the clearest of information :-) It might be that the Dr. said that James either needs to start formula or start taking a vitamin. Since we don't carry our babies outside to work everyday, breastfed babies tend to be lacking vitamin D which is naturally absorbed through sunlight and added to formula. I remember our pediatrician told us that until he was drinking some number or oz of formula or whole milk, he needed a multivitamin.

We love our pediatrician, Dr. Villalobos, but she's at Point West (near Arden Mall). She is straight forward, doesn't patronize our son, and always makes him feel comfortable. Our son has always been tall and thin, and she has been very possitive about him and our parenting choices. As long as a child is developing normally, being skinny isn't a problem (especially if both parents were thin children).

Do check on the forumula vs vitamin thing, though.

HTH,
T.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.C.

answers from San Francisco on

S., the only reason I know of for taking a child from breast milk to formula is if they are not thriving. It sounds like your son is thriving just fine. You should contact the doctor and get clarification about why he thought you should switch. Perhaps it was a misunderstanding on your husband's part.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

P.L.

answers from San Francisco on

Before you do anything else, call the pediatrician and ask for an explanation.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

R.A.

answers from Sacramento on

Oh my goodness...this is so unfortunate. How attached to this pediatrician are you? Any pediatrician who advises you to give your child formula (Artificial baby milk) instead of breast milk (what the body makes for your baby) does not have your child's best interest in mind. If your child is thriving, keep doing what you are doing. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding for at least one year. These are the guidelines your pediatrician should be practicing under and advising his patients accordingly. I would actually just about guarantee you that your baby won't take formula at this point, anyway. Have you ever tasted that stuff? Yuck! Good luck with this, and stand strong with your hubby. There's tons of literature out there to back you up. Just look at the guidelines written under the AAP and World Health Organization's Healthy People Initiative. Good luck...:)

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.P.

answers from Fresno on

Unless your son is showing signs of malnutrition, (in blood work or other ways)Just keep doing what you are doing. Specially, since your son is growing and is doing well. Most doctors don't know a dam thing about dietary nutrition! The reason why now most medical schools are requiring students to take some dietary classes. Some doctors automatically think, unless the kid is on formulam the kid isn't getting enough nourishment. Unless your son starts showing signs of slowing down in growth or mental development, I would not worry.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.Q.

answers from Sacramento on

Hello,

Since you were not at the actual doctors appointment you might want to contact the doctor and ask why he/she suggested starting formula. I breast fed both of my children and they never had formula and are very healthy. (one is 4 and one is 9) My youngest is always in the 25th percentile for both height and weight. Our peditrician looks at the fact that she is growing and is healthy. The growth charts are just a guide line, as long as your little boy is healthy and growing I would not add formula to his diet, breastmilk is the perfect food for him. You said he is 9 months old in aobut three months you will start introducing him to milk why take a step back now?
Hope this helps

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.C.

answers from Sacramento on

S.,

Stick with the breast feeding, sometimes doctors promote because they get kick backs or free samples from the formula company reps.

Sounds like your baby is doing fine, if your worried at all, you could pump the one feeding that your baby weened off of, and give the breast milk in a cup.

Sometimes baby ween off the breast when they begin to not need milk anymore. Just as when your child grows, sometimes they won't eat food, because their bodies don't need it.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

B.G.

answers from San Francisco on

I am sorry but that just seems ridiculous. there are so many other ways to get your child the proper nutrients. #1 is you can up your vitamin intake. I would say, that if your dr is concerned about iron, then maybe you should go back on your prenatal or an iron supplement. what ever you eat your child will benefit from. #2 it is up to you how long you breast feed and until your husband or your dr grows breasts and realize how difficult and draining it is and what a commitment it is to your child they have no place to talk. Give me a break, natural is always better than synthetic. Truly, if you can and want to breastfeed, then you should. And you can always supplement with solids as your child grows.
that is funny, Get a second opinion.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.G.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi!
You absolutely not have to give formula if you don't want to!
Solid food and breastmilk is enough!
My girl, now 16 months, never liked formula, so I breastfed her until she was 11 months and gave her solid food and water to drink.
You don't have to do everything the doctor tells you, and especially if your child is growing the way he should, there is no concern to worry.

Hang in there!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.W.

answers from Yuba City on

Stacy,

I can't even imagine why any doctor would tell you to put your child on formula. Yes it is a personal choice as to whether or not you breast feed, but every bit of research shows breast-feeding is best. Even the formula commercials on TV say that.

I would recommend you call the doctor and get clarification on his/her instructions and why. Even if your child were iron deficient or something, they could give vitamins. I breast-fed both of my children for over a year. It sounds like you are doing the same thing I did was which was to slowly replace the breastfeeding with solid meals and then when his is old enough to cows milk. My son was less interested in breast-feeding, as he got closer to one year, mostly because he had to sit still and if he had breast milk in a sippy cup he could stay on the move. My daughter was more of a cuddler and her last feedings were more for bonding and comfort than milk.

Lastly, I would say you are his mother and there are many times where we know best, even if someone else who we may consider more qualified is telling us something different. Unless the doctor has a serious medical reason, not that this is his or her preference, I would continue to breast feed.

Also...just a tip...when we started transitioning the kids over to cows milk I built up a supply of frozen breast milk so we could slowly start with 3/4 breast milk and 1/4 cow milk in his cup and then gradually decrease the breast milk in the mixture and increase the cows milk. This seems to work better for their tummies and taste buds.

J.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.P.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,
That does sound strange for a doctor to insist on formula without a detailed explanation as to why. My son is 4 months old and went down in weight percentile from 80 % to 50% in two months and my doctor said that does happen sometimes where they go up and down a bit and jussuggested keeping a bit more track of how often I breastfeed but I would never have thought to go to formula because of it unless there really was a specific issue. Here is an answer on a wesite that I thought you might find helpful. Good luck, A. =)

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Breastfeeding-1764/2008/1/Milk...

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.J.

answers from San Francisco on

This is frustrating to hear. From what you said, I don't see any reason why he needs to start formula. The pediatrician couldn't even explain why? Has the doctor said anything else in the past that might have suggested he didn't know a lot about breastfeeding? I don't see why you would need formula. If you are really concerned, you could get a second opinion, but maybe before that you could call the doc's office and ask for a good explanation of why he needs to start formula. I breastfed our son exclusively until 6 months, and then started on solids -- which he did NOT take to until 3 months later -- and continued to breastfeed. He gained weight and is fine and now likes solids. From everything I've researched, he'd even be fine nutritionally from just breast milk until a year. Do you know about www.kellymom.com -- lots of consolidation of breastfeeding research.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.B.

answers from Bakersfield on

S.,
I had four sons, two of which were twins, and I nursed all of them. I nursed the oldest 10 months, the second 20 1/2 months, and the twins for 22 1/2 months. I occasionally supplemented with formula for the oldest, only breastfed the second, and rarely supplemented the twins. They were all drinking from sippy cups around six months, had baby food around four months, and started solid food around 7 months. My sons are all very healthy and slim; they have muscle, but are slim like my husband. When they were young they were lean (not skinny) but grew at a steady pace. Breastfed babies tend to be slim as any doctor will tell you if they have a clue. If he is growing steadily and eating well, I would not give him formula. The healthiest child I have was singly breastfed; if he didn't have to get immunizations the doctor wouldn't even know who he was as he only gets one cold a year and no infections. He has an extremely good immune system and is on his high school swim team. As with a lot of things you have to trust what you know; if he is healthy stay the course on what you've been doing. Fat babies are not necessarily healthy babies so why try to fatten them up?
We were stationed in Guam as my husband was in the Air Force when the twins were 1-3 and they repeatedly contracted the Rota virus as many toddlers do over there. A lot of my friends who did not breastfeed had to take their kids to the hospital overnight due to dehydration, but I never did because my boys could hold down my milk even when they couldn't hold down water. It really is the best thing for them. Synthetic is not.
C. B.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.K.

answers from San Francisco on

I would call your pediatrician and find out exactly why he's recommending the switch. If your son is healthy and putting on weight I don't see any reason for the switch unless the pediatrician detected some sort of vitamin or mineral deficiancy. But even that can be corrected with infant vitamin drops.

I hate to bring this up, but is it possible that your husband raised the formula question at the visit because he want's your brests back? I know it sounds weird but I had a friend who's husband actually celebrated when their son was weaned because it meant that his wifes breasts were "all his" again.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

J.K.

answers from San Francisco on

Why don't you find out the doctor's reason for wanting to start him on formula. I have a feeling it might be for iron intake, because a lot of breastfed kids have low iron. If you don't agree with the reason your pediatrician gives, I'm sure there is a way to respectfully disagree.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.B.

answers from San Francisco on

What a Bummer! It doesn't get more disappointing than that! I happen to LOVE my Kaiser Ped, but we're in Walnut Creek... Dr. Bergen is *Father Nature* and the Head of Pediatrics, he encouraged Extended Nursing, The Family Bed & Anti CIO.... :) I would definitely switch Dr.'s!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.D.

answers from San Francisco on

I don't think you ever have to put them on formula. You should talk to another doc or midwife. I nursed both my kids almost two years, never formula.

It's a fifties mentality that babies need this. Please children have survived thousands of years without formula.

If you need something extra which at 9 months if you are still nursing you don't, you can make your own drink. Both my kids had raw goats milk after a year as an additional drink. They loved it and it was good for them

you sound just fine. Trust your instinct and your husbands

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

P.H.

answers from San Francisco on

We faced the formula battle with our pediatrician regarding our twins, now 9 mos old. I tandem breastfeed them. They are growing but average 1/2 lb to 1 lb a month. According to the head lactation consultant at Good Samaritan Hospital, many of the pediatricians are using a growth chart provided by a formula company. The formula growth chart expects an oz per day in the early months. She says a breastfed baby should be plotted on the World Health Organization growth chart for breastfed babies not the formula chart. Another good resource would be La Leche League. We took a stance with our pediatrician & she doesn't love it but we are comfortable with their slow growth & being at 5-25th percentile of the formula based growth chart. With today's problem of obesity, why push it.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

T.S.

answers from Salinas on

I would call the doctor and ask for clarification. Breast is best as we know. There must be some reason for the recommendation. My husband stays at home with the kids but I attend every appt because us moms need to know and would have asked why. No disrespect to the dads at all. My first daughter never had an ounce of formula her life and the doctor applauded that. There must be a reason and the doctor should explain. Good luck.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.G.

answers from San Francisco on

Breast milk is superior to formula and I would not switch. My daughter was always on the lowest percentile of weight. I b.fed her for 2 years. Everytime i came back form a well visit, they had me paranoid about her being smaller than average. She is 3 and still very slim. Always will be. My 6 month old is the opposite, now in the 90% for weight and height. She is very super solid. Also being b. fed. All children are different. I would nevey switch form your breast to Formula, never. Do what feels right for you though.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.P.

answers from Modesto on

S.,

First I would say to contact your dr. and find out what the reasoning is. At 9 months I think they tested my son for iron. It could be that he just needs some supplemental iron. I would not stop breastfeeding (personally) but look to find an alternative that meets the dr.'s concerns.

If the Dr. is unwilling to discuss, get another Dr. ;0) If the Dr. gives you a different story than your husband, talk to your hubby and make sure he isn't the one with an issue about bf ing ;0)

Good luck and keep bfing if your kid is healthy!

M.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

H.F.

answers from San Francisco on

I think you should talk to your hubby and then the pediatrician again. Often times drs will reccomend something because theythink that is what the parent wants. Perhaps hubby made a comment or expressed concern with sons size or with knowing if he is getting enough food and the doctor wanted to make him feel okay about giving formula. I have four children all who were breastfed and each grew at thier own pace. I have two that definately grew slow. My daughter gained a pound a month until about six months at which point she slowed down to about 1/2 to 3/4 of a pound a month and slowed down again at 9 months and even more after a year. It is normal for weight gain to slow down as the baby gets older. We had a great pediatrician who told us as long as development was normal and her head was continuing to grow she was doing fine. He even told us with so many overweight kids out there it is nice to see some thinner babies coming through his office. My 5 month old is also a little lightweight she gains but very slow. I just got back from visiting some family on thier dairy farm and I was told well this time around you aren't the prize winning cow. As dairymen well know some cows produce higher fat milk than others and I am sure the same is true with moms. You are doing great to be so concerned.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.L.

answers from San Francisco on

I would call and talk to the Doctor directly about his advice and your concerns. Sometimes "urgency" has different interpretations. Moms have a keen sense of what is right for their own children. I raised 4 children and have 2 grandchildren and even though each of my children were breastfed for different lengths of time, I've always heard that if it works for the mother and her schedule, mother's milk is best!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.K.

answers from Fresno on

Wow, you've already had so many responses, so mine probably doesn't matter, but here goes anyway :o) I would definitely talk to the pediatrician. There may have been a misunderstanding, either by your husband of what the doctor said or perhaps something your husband said to encourage the doctor to make such a suggestion. We also have Kaiser (LOVE IT) and they have the awesome option now of emailing your doctor. You can either use this to express everything in an email if you're uncomfortable discussing it on the phone (although I think a parent should always be 100% comfortable talking to their pediatrician) or to simply send the message that you want him to call you. I can only speak for our doctor, but he usually gets back to us within the hour if I email him (so forget the phone service!). Also, my niece and nephew have a great pediatrician at the Elk Grove Kaiser, so if you feel the need to switch, message me and I'll find out her info.

Lastly, congratulations on your dedication to breastfeeding, even while working. It takes a tremendous sacrifice to do so successfully and I'm very thankful that it's that important to you. Way to go!! Neither of my boys had a drop of formula - and that could be challenging, for sure, and I'm at home full-time. So, for all you working moms who still manage to exclusively breastfeed, I tip my hat and am very proud!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

M.P.

answers from San Francisco on

S. -

You should definately clarify this with your doctor. It's unfair for you, your baby andyour doctor to switch without maiking it clear what he said/meant and why. Also,if that is the only reason you don't like that doctor, there really is no reason to switch. You know what you want and you make the decisions. Also, just a possibility, my doctor mentioned that some children have a hard time transisitioning to cow's milk from being breastfed, so it may be that he wants you to supplement a little to ease that transition. I don't know, just a suggestion. I also breastfed, but I couldn't produce enough to keep up with my son, who is in the 100th percentile for everything!!! I had to stop earlier than you, so I definately support breastfeeding, I just don't want you to ignore the doctor without clarification. I don't want to start a fight, but it sounded like your husband wasn't quite so supportive of the breast feeding as you woul like him to be, could this be where this subject came from? Just a suggestion. I wish youthe best of luck!!!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

N.V.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S., my name is N., my children are much older now. But recently I was talking with another mom who mentioned solid foods for babies before 1 years old is not suggested by some doctors because of food allergies. As for formula....I'm not sure, but maybe look into speaking with an allergy specialist as well, and ask what they think about formula and solid food for babies. Just for a second opinion.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.S.

answers from San Francisco on

I absolutely would continue to breastfeed. Current recommendations are to breastfeed until your little one is at least 12 months old. At that time you can continue bf'ing or you can transition to whole cow's milk. There is no reason to ever need to switch to formula.
If your husband went to the Dr's. appointment and you are hearing the Dr's. recommendations second hand, why don't you contact your pedi and have him/her clarify what their recommendations are. If they say to swicth to formula, ask why? If the pedi's opinion differs from what you feel is right, I would ask about seeing a pedi who seems more in line with your parenting style.

Breast is BEST!!!!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

C.C.

answers from San Francisco on

Hi S.,

I'm not sure why a pediatrician would tell you to start giving the baby formula instead of breastmilk, UNLESS your husband misunderstood the doctor (or wasn't really paying close attention a.k.a selective listening). If the baby is not getting enough milk from you, then you can supplement "nursing" with formula.

I suggest you schedule another appt. with the pediatrician and be there yourself to ask any concerns you may have about the instructions your husband gave you.

A good way to tell if your baby is getting enough milk from you is if the baby is sleeping through the night and no longer needing to be fed every 2-3 hours.

I am a mom with 2 children and I did have to give formula to my 2nd child as a supplement to my breastmilk, because she was just not getting enough milk. You may have trouble giving James formula at first because the smell and taste is different, but he'll get the hang of it.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

S.F.

answers from San Francisco on

That makes no sense to me - breastmilk in general has more calories per unce than formula. In fact, I would recommend less solids and more breastmilk if anything. Perhaps you could pump and he could have expressed BM with his meals.

Also, 9 months is too young to be weaning off of feedings. Until 12 months, solids are complementary to nursing/breastmilk/formula. I would really try to offer the breast in the middle of the day again. Is baby getting expressed breastmilk during the day while you are away?

The other thing is that BF babies slow down in terms of weight gain after 6 months whereas FF babies do tend to steadily gain. The doctor is likely using the formula growth charts instead of the World Health Organization's growth charts (http://kellymom.com/babyconcerns/growth/index.html) which are based on BF babies' growth. Increasing motor skills also account for slowing in weight gain.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

V.M.

answers from Stockton on

Did you know we are the only mammal that drinks another mammals milk after the infant stage? I have raised many children and as long as you are making sure that the vitamins and minerals and all other nutritional needs are met, your child will be fine. All children grow at different rates and frankly I think those growth charts are hog wash. If your child is happy, healthy, and still growing and active. Go back to the old attage.....(Mothers Know Best)...... good luck.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

E.B.

answers from San Francisco on

I think it's very important that as a Mama, you follow your instincts. If you feel that it's wrong, don't do it. If you want more information, seek it out (as you are doing by posting this). Call the doctor. See a different doctor. Call La Leche League.

Doctors are not the end all, be all. I have gotten plenty of bad advice from pediatricians. I agree that this doesn't seem right. Why would your baby need formula, when he's thriving on solids and milk from his Mama? I wonder what the doctor's motivation is for this advice. Unfortunately such advice is not always motivated by the doc's belief in what's best for the child. Doctors are given lots of incentives to prescribe medicines and push formulas.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

A.A.

answers from San Francisco on

I recommend the book: The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding put out by the La Leche League as a great reference to have on your bookshelf for just about anything related to breastfeeding. Also, it sounds to me that your intuition is good and that your son is healthy and developing well. I'd call the doctor myself first... and have a chat. I've read that most pediatricians concur with each other and recommend breastfeeding for a year at least.

I personally chose to take it further and breastfed my son until he was 3 1/2. I wanted him to gradually ease into eating solids and wean himself of feedings, which he did. At the end there, breastfeeding was a comfort and a joy upon waking and going to sleep. I was the one that was ready to stop after 3 1/2 years and eased us into other morning and evening rituals that replaced the breastfeeding, explaining to him that my body was telling me it was time to stop. I've known women who have breastfed for shorter periods of time and for longer periods. It believe it is a personal choice and I've noticed that all sorts of people have all sorts of opinions based on a "model" and not necessarily the individual relationship between the mother and child. There are also those who are uncomfortable for various reasons.

Good luck!

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

B.H.

answers from Fresno on

S.,
Here is my opinion. My son too is 9 mos.He breastfeeds 3-4 times a day. My Dr. did not tell me to start giving him formula. I do on occasions when he wants to nurse and it is not time. I am really not a strict nazi mom about breastfeeding, it is just I don't want him to graze all day. I remember with my daughter (now 4) that by 1 year she was having formula sometimes but breast milk 2 times a day. Just becasue she couldn't have cows milk untill after 1. I would say not to worry about the doctor, he/she might be suggesting you start to ween. I would call St. Agnes breastfeeding nurses if you have any questions or concerns. They have been awsome for me.
Hope this gives you some help. By the way, way to go for breastfeeding and teaching!!!!
B.

Smallavatar-fefd015f3e6a23a79637b7ec8e9ddaa6

L.W.

answers from Yuba City on

Congratulations! This may be the first of many MANY times you will question what a person of authority [or just a friend or family member] advises that you do for your child. And you PASSED the test! You did not immediately do as you were told [bad girl !] but instead sought other guidance, talked to your spouse, listened to your gut, and decided on your own what to do [GOOD GIRL]. This will not be the last time you will have to use these skills.

As for the breastmilk iron issue, one source you might want to refer to is the La Leche League. On their forum [ http://www.llli.org/FAQ/vitamin.html ] I found this:

"Iron According to THE BREASTFEEDING ANSWER BOOK, published by LLLI, the iron in human milk is better absorbed by your baby than is the iron in cow's milk or iron-fortified formula. This means that the quantity of iron in human milk is appropriate for baby instead of the larger quantity in cow's milk. The full-term healthy baby usually has no need of additional iron until about the middle of his first year, around the time he starts taking solids. The high lactose ad vitamin C levels in human milk aid the absorption of iron, and breastfed babies do not lose iron through their bowels. If there is concern about the baby's iron levels, a simple hemoglobin test can be done in the doctor's office. If necessary, it is easy to offer the baby foods which are naturally rich in iron. However, iron drops and iron-fortified foods sometimes cause digestive upsets when given to babies and can actually reduce the efficiency of iron absorption."

As for switching pediatricians? Maybe, maybe not. Pediatricians know what they are taught. And they may have been "taught" by the visits and promotions of formula manufacturers. You might be in a position to give him some education and feedback from your own obviously healthy breastfed child that will help him counter the marketing "education" he has received. This would help you develop your own "Momma Bear" skills to be an advocate for your child, and might benefit the next young mothers to be in his medical practice. You can always switch if he/she is really obnoxious, but there will be other times [like when you child is in school and has a difficult teacher] when switching is not so easy, and you will be glad for the advocacy skills you develop in this situation.

You GO MamaBear S.!

About me? - My kids are grown now, but I breastfed them - including a set of premie twins - for quite a while. I DID need to use a supplemental formula for the smaller of the twins who had a poor suck reflex and "failure to thrive", but that is not your issue. Sounds like your child is doing FINE.

For Updates and Special Promotions
Follow Us

Related Questions