Do You Believe Shots Can Cause Kids Become Autism

Updated on December 10, 2010
M.A. asks from Lehi, UT
7 answers

My mother-in-law read an article saying 'do not let your Dr administer 8 shots at a time as it may cause autism; ask for immunizations without mercury as they are dangerous to our children;' Do you believe immunizations / preservation in immunization can cause autism? My baby girl got 4 / 5 shots at her two-month check up. I am taking her to Dr for her four-month check up this Friday and wonder if I should only let Dr gives her one shot instead of 5 shots.

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A.B.

answers from Provo on

I went back and forth with this issue. I have tons of friends on the no vacine fence and my husbands family is all in the medical field. So I came up with a compromise that I and my pediatricioan could live with. I don't do polio, and hepititis a or b until my kids are 2. It means more shots later but my reasoning is this...they are the most controversial and by the time a childs body is 2 they have more natural immunity to fight the "poisons".
It is such an emotional issue on both sides...good luck.

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K.H.

answers from Salt Lake City on

I would talk to your doctor about the shots. I don't see a problem giving the immunizations. I never had a problem with my son having the shots. He is now 4 years old. But they might could give 2 at a time and then you won't have so many to have to make up before they start school. Good luck!

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N.W.

answers from Dallas on

I could fill a room with mothers I've met whose children fell into autism after vaccinations.

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H.

answers from Provo on

M. there is so much you can read about on this issue, and in the end you have to follow your heart. I think it is worth looking into. Personally I am selectivly immunizing and I am waiting until my baby is older. The amount of "medicine" in these shots is so huge compared to the size of our babies... instead of getting on my soap box I would just suggest you do some reading and get both sides of the issue. Only you know what is best for your children. Good Luck!

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J.R.

answers from Salt Lake City on

Actually, the mercury based preservative, thimerosal has been taken out of almost all childhood vaccines. I pulled this blurb from an article in the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons:

"Despite its removal from many childhood vaccines, thimerosal is still routinely added to some formulations of influenza vaccine administered to U.S. infants, as well as to several other vaccines (e.g. tetanus-diphtheria and monovalent tetanus) administered to older children and adults."

Despite the risks (there is risk in everything you do--like when you get in your car and drive), the benefit out-weighs the risk. All of those lovely things we are vaccinating against are now seeing a resurgence as more people are declining to vaccinate. Since thimerosal has been removed from most vaccinations, there has been a corresponding drop in the autism cases. I hope you would carefully consider the pros and cons. It is truly safer now than it was for even my children 10 years ago, and my guys are very normal....Good luck and hope this info helps.

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C.P.

answers from Provo on

M.;
Well, if you talk to a Dr. they will tell you there is absolutely no proof that the shots cause autism. However, the theory that it does is gaining momentum. I had a friend to was certain her son got autism after his 18 month shots. Consider that for most of the diseases that kids are imminized for these days, there is very little chance of them getting the disease--when was the last time you heard of someone with polio or measles, for example? So, I decided to wait and really spread them out. I got the hepatitis shots at first, and then slowly got the rest, finishing just in time for Kindergarten. It is not like you are endangering you child by not getting them as an infant. When I heard there was pertussis at the local school, I got those shots a little earlier, like at 3 years old. I've heard the MMR is the most dangerous, so I wait the longest for those. I found doctors were more responsive when I didn't make a big deal about how I thought the shots were dangerous, but just mildly said I was going to wait on the shots.

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R.S.

answers from Provo on

I'm leaning toward no. I asked my pediatrician about it and she said there is no proof that they do (like the other lady). I then asked why she thought it is on the rise and she said that first of all, it may not be. It's likely we are just more aware of it and are diagnosing cases that wouldn't have been diagnosed before as autism. If it is, there are other possible causes. It's tough to say. There was a study done recently that I read about in the WSJ yesterday that says they are being able to diagnose infants (somewhat accurately) by using eye-scanning technology. Infants that are more likely to have autism look longer at faces that are looking away instead of faces that are looking straight at them. That type of thing. If that's the case, it can't be the eighteen-month shots that are causing it. However, there may be different types of autism. Who knows. We do know that all kids don't get it from shots, though, which means that shots don't "cause" it, just "release" it if you have the genetic disposition. If that's the case, then you might get it from either something else in your lifetime or from getting the shots later. It might not make a difference. I know I'm rambling a bit, it's because I'm thinking it through as I'm writing. Anyway, yeah. I did want to say in response to the other lady's response "when's the last time you met someone with polio" or whatever it was and I just wanted to say that while that's true, it's because of these vaccinations. If we stop giving them to our children, it will resurface. It basically boils down to each mother's decision at this point I suppose. Good luck with your decision! Oh, and if makes a difference to you, it is much more common among boys for some reason.

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