16 answers

When Should I Stop Using the Infant Carseat/carrier?

My twins are 9 1/2months old. My son weighs 19lbs, & is 31inches tall & my daughter weighs allmost 17lbs and is 28inches tall. When should I stop using the baby carrier and start using the regular car seat? Both of their feet do hang out of the carriers. Their heads are close to the top but not yet poking out. My daughter sits great, my son isnt as steady sitting up by himself, he usually does a face plant after a few minutes of being upright and not completely supported. Iam tired of lugging baby carriers but Im not sure about what to do when I go to the store & need to use a shopping cart. Any ideas????
*Edit* Both carseats were checked by the fire dept W/kids in them a few weeks ago. The infant carriers have a weight limit of 30lbs. I guess Im looking for more of an age to transition them. The regular carseats will be installed rear facing when we do start using them

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Featured Answers

I stopped when my daughter was 3 months old and my son was 4 months old. Once their feet are hanging over the edge, you are not supposed to use them anymore.

1 mom found this helpful

A-Teams Mommy,

I have always been told by my pediatrician that when the head is getting very close to the top to stop using the infact carrier and start using a regular car seat. My second baby started using a regular car seat at 10 months. I hope that this helps!

I. K.

More Answers

Each car seat has it's own height and weight parameters. You need to check those!

2 moms found this helpful

Check the specifications for your car seat AND check the specifications for rear facing/forward facing seat belt requirements for your state.

Most recent studies have shown that the longer a child is rear-facing, the safer it is for that child. They are recommending that children stay rear-facing for at least 15 months.

I realize that you can get convertible car seats (not infant carriers) that can be rear-facing, but I will personally leave my child in the infant carrier as long as she can for her safety (she is 1 year old today!). I always think back to that first time that we switched our son from the infant carrier to his new seat, and we got to a place where he was sleeping. If he was still in his carrier, then we could have popped out the carrier and brought him in without waking him, but since he was in his new carseat, we had to get him out of the carseat, and it woke him up in the process (and boy, was he a crank!).

Two more things:
*Just because it is an infant carrier doesn't mean that you have to take the carrier part out of the car. If you get somewhere and the kiddos are awake, then you may want to leave the carseats in the car and just get the kids out.
*With the summer (it gets VERY hot around here), I prefer to have the car seat carriers inside whenever possible, because car seats can get very hot if left in the car. Obviously, if you had switched to a regular carseat, then this wouldn't be a practical option, and in that case, you'll want to just be really careful when putting your children in the car so that they don't get burnt from the hot buckles.

2 moms found this helpful

WEight wise they are fine, but length wise they probably need to be moved soon. You will need a convertible car seat to keep rear facing as long as possible.
As for the lugging carriers, you can get a wrap or a carrier like a Bjorn, ergo, or Baboa. So your daughter that sits can be in the cart and your son can be worn on you. :D

2 moms found this helpful

You can switch them to the rear facing convertibles any time now - you don't have to wait until they max out the height or weight limits, and they can stay in the infant seats as long as they're within the weight limits and there's at least 1" of hard plastic shell above their heads (this link has a lot of helpful info on how to measure the 1" as well as a good overall summary/review of child safety seat usage:
http://carseatblog.com/9416/confused-about-the-new-aap-ca...)

For the first few months after my twins outgrew their infant carriers, I still used them as "lounge chairs" and "shuttles" - we had no off-street parking and about 10 steps down the front porch to the sidewalk, so for a while I still carried them down to the car in their infant seats and then buckled them one at a time into their convertible seats, and when they got to be too big for me to carry both at once, I'd have one sitting in the infant seat by the front door while I carried one down, buckled her in, and ran back up for the second one (I never got the hang of babywearing but I know many other twin moms will use some sort of babywearing wrap/sling to bring their babies to the car)
For shopping - I used to use my Maclaren double side-by-side stroller and hang a hand-carry basket over two of the handles as well as numerous canvas shopping bags for carrying lighter weight stuff to the checkout. A number of twin moms I know also swear by the Graco DuoRider side-by-side as a great "grocery shopping" stroller b/c it has huge storage baskets

1 mom found this helpful

I would check the height requirements as well on the specific seats.
I wouldn't worry so much about what age is appropriate to transition them but more on what is safest for them. They need to be in a seat that fits them properly.
Both of my boys were very large babies. They each outgrew their infant carriers at about 4 months old. I went ahead and got the convertible seats and installed them rear facing. They were so young that they couldn't sit up yet so we did have issues at places with shopping carts, etc. I would either put them in a stroller or bring in a big blanket and tuck it around them in the shopping cart to help support them and hold them up. I also still carried my infant seat in the back of my car. I would have them in the convertable seat when I was driving and then when we were going into somewhere that they would need a seat in I would grab the infant seat out of the back and put them in it. Not the most convienent but at least they were safe while I was driving and then I had a place to put them while we were at a store or restaurant.

1 mom found this helpful

We had to switch when the straps became too short to buckle her in. My daughter was long and lean and she outgrew the straps long before she reached the weight limit.
They must stay rear facing by law until they are one, but it is better to keep them rear facing as long as possible, even if their legs are a little cramped.
You can switch to a rear facing convertible seat at any point, but be warned, those seats are pretty much permanently installed in your car and you no longer have the convenience of carrying a sleeping baby inside.
I never used the carrier much to carry my daughter around, but though that is was very convenient that I could strap her in and take her out in the house instead of buckling her in the car....
Good luck.

1 mom found this helpful

I stopped when my daughter was 3 months old and my son was 4 months old. Once their feet are hanging over the edge, you are not supposed to use them anymore.

1 mom found this helpful

I go by size rather than age. Your son may be out of his first since he's taller. My daughter is 20 months and she still fits in her carrier. Although we just use it for a back up in my parents and I put a convertible rearfacing in my car a month or 2 ago. I think my infant seat says an inch between top of head and top of seat.

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