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Whats the Going Rate for at Home Daycare?

I am watching a 7month old baby and have been charging $25/day for 6:45am-4pm and $35 for 6:45am-6pm. I only charge for the days I babysit (normally 4 days a week). The schedule changes frequently and I am "on call" all week. I normally get at least 12 hours notice of schedule changes from the parents. I get paid for the week on Mon so if any extra shifts are added I don't get paid for them until the following week. Today I talked to the parents about raising my rates by $5 a day ($30 for normal days and $40 for long days) bc my husbands pay check got cut at his work and bc I will need to put some money back to pay taxes at the end of the year on my income. We are a low income family so I wanted to try and save some for the end of the year taxes I will owe. The parents agreed and then came back and said that they wanted me to think about it more.... and that I need to add in the cost of gas they use to bring the child over and pick her up. They also said "the average home daycare charges $35/day and hours are 7am to 6pm, so we could take her to any home daycare.....not that we would" ~ So basically I don't understand what all this means and need some others opinions on it. Am I asking to much for the $5 a day raise? Should I just leave the rates so I won't lose the income?

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The average amount in my area for an at home daycare I have found to be around $175/week. The couple I babysit for said they would pay $120 a week so I may just go with that so that I don't lose her. I really enjoy watching her! I do think I will make a contract up though and try to include in loop holes or problems that may come up in the future. I really don't like discussing money with people bc it makes me very uncomfortable but I also want to feel like Im getting a fair rate. Their we're other reasons why the pay was being negotiated, changes that were happening. If anyone wants to send advice about what to have in my contract Id appreciate it!! Thanks everyone for the support!

NEW UPDATE: So I made a contract for the amount they wanted and everything. It is a weekly contract so they will pay the full amount even when she doesn't come. However, if I take off I day I said I would deduct that from the amount. They argued that too! Saying that they can take her to a daycare center for the price and food would be provided for her! She is 7 months old, still on formula and some baby food. I told them my contract is what I can offer and that was it. She gets one on one care here and she loves it here. I told them that if they wanted to take her some where else they could. He also brought up the gas again that I should caculate that into my price!! Well I think I suprised them by saying take it or leave it and by the time he got home he called and said he would accept the contract as long as I give 45 day notice to any of my days off! Some people you just can't win with but at least I try! I am still going to be watching her.

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I pay $25 per day for a 2.5 y/o. She is open from 7 am - 5:30 pm and charges per day, not different amounts for longer/shorter days. We pay her regardless if my son is there or not and we also pay her for holidays.

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I live outside of Dallas and pay $150 a week for my 7 month old. I consider that CHEAP compared to other inhome daycares and actual daycare facilities. I dop off around 7 and my daughter gets picked up between 4-5:30. Payment is always due on Friday before the next week and i pay for days shes not there and holidays. Its the least i could do for my daughters caregiver! good luck!

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I pay 175/week, no exceptions, pay for days I'm there and days I'm not. that averages out to 35/day. Every daycare I've talked to, you have to pay for the whole week, whether you're there or not. we get 2 weeks unpaid, and she gets 2 weeks paid vacation.

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wow! what an eye-opener! I live in mid-MO....& I am on the upper scale for inhome daycare: $80/week, with some of those days 10-12 hours long. All of my parents feel I do not charge enough....& yet, all of my parents are financially struggling. Good jobs are hard to come by in our small town! A basic secretary makes about $10/hour- if she's lucky, a teacher with a Masters - about $35,000......& the average home runs about $100-150,000.

I periodically check the competition....& it ranges anywhere from $10/day for inhome care to $20/day for state-compliant facilities. A few daycares range in the middle, as do I. I recently bumped up my infant care to $90/week......& maybe it's time to check out the competition again! Thanks for the eye-opener. !!!

Now to part of your question: it sounds as if your families have shopped around & have found other options. The $5/day raise is actually a lot. Usually increases are $5-$10/week. You have chosen a career which is taken for granted by many parents, & most families resent having to pay a chunk of their wages for their children's care. It's sad, but true. You'll hear all kinds of comments about how little you make & what a shame it is....but when it's push come to shove....forget it! Good luck getting cooperation on salary increases! In the almost 9 years I've been doing this, I've met with resistance with each rate increase. I hate having it turn into a point of contention!

I do have a few recommendations. If you do not have a policy handbook, please consider creating one. Set your hours & rates in "stone".....eliminating that fluctuation which makes budgeting so hard. Instead of the $25/$35 change-up based on the # of hours.....flip to a flat rate of $35/day. Set your rate schedule based on full or part-time......anything over 30 hours/week is considered full-time & warrants a full week's paycheck.

When your families register with you, ask them to designate full or part-time. Your salary is then based on that pre-set designation....& you will have a guaranteed paycheck each week. If you have a family who only needs you a couple of days/week, by having this pre-set designation - you are free to fill in that other part of the time slot....again, guaranteeing you a full salary & not leaving you hanging by a thread!

For my policy handbook, I clearly state that once the full/part-time designation is set....I get paid, regardless of whether or not the child is present. The ONLY time I do not get paid is if I take off a day or take vacation. I get paid for their personal days, all public holidays, & their vacations. This process will also eliminate you being "on call", which will make your life much easier! & I do require a phone call if the child is not coming for the day....

Soooo, make a handbook. Set your rates/schedule & have a sit-down conference with your families. Flat-out tell them that you are trying to be fair to all involved, & this is now your policy & that you hope they will stay with you. My biggest fear is that you approached them...stating/divulging your husband's loss of income as your reason for the attempted increase. These parents don't care about your financial standing.....they have their own worries & concerns.....& your loss does not have to be their responsibility. I know that sounds harsh, but I've seen it all with my families & have learned my lesson! My income, my finances.....are mine & not their problem or issue! & the fact that they are being resistant to the increase says that they are willing to move on...... Good Luck & stand strong!

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Bottom line, I think you should charge what you feel you need to charge and leave it at that. If they say, "We could take our child to another daycare" you should be polite but firm and say, "Well, I understand. If you want to look into that I will be very happy for you. But I am going to raise my rates and I hope you decide to leave your child with me." You could also mention that you already have a relationship with the child and change in routine is never easy and a new daycare might also mean registration charges, etc. It's up to you but I think what you want to charge is very fair.

It's hard to stand up for our value but don't be afraid. You can do it. Just handle it with a smile and a patient voice and you will be communicating professionalism.

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I was doing this for $25 a day and just told them I couldn't do it anymore. The schedule changing without much notice, on being on call at any hour any day of the week including weekends wasn't worth it to me. So I agree, if you had a set schedule, then it would be okay for what you are charging (even though I think you could charge more), but the headache and hassle of dealing with unpredictability should be a higher fee.

Daycares that are open for longer and night hours and weekends always charge more, home providers who have to work around those odd hours should as well.

Them asking you to include their gas is ridiculous. And call their bluff, if they want to go somewhere else, fine, I'm sure you could find another child to care for as well. Stand by your rates, do not give excuses.

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Here's the things you need to keep in mind. No matter what a parent says, there is very little loyalty in the daycare world. I've done this 24 years and have many clients that have been singing my praises left and right, day and night for months. But mess with their money, make them pay for a vacation while they are gone (theirs, not mine), tell them they MUST pay in advance when they think a personal expense should make me wait for my money, and or change the rate because they are coming later and later every single day...suddenly, they are threatening and or just out the door.

The next thing to keep in mind is that competition is stiff. Every single day people get pregnant or laid off and think, "Gee, I'll run a daycare". It's sad to see how many people get into daycare as a lark, an after thought, and not because of a well planned life desire. So they sweep in, place a few ads and realize that it's hard to get clients at first. So they lower the rates. The last few years with people getting laid off a little more often, we've had more and more new pop up daycare's to contend with. In the end, the vast majority of families get burned by inexperienced people and land back on our doorstep. Here's another fact to deal with and it's not nice. Some people will keep and harbor a little list in their mind of things they feel you didn't do or should have done. They'll think they like you over all and your great but... Then when you raise your rate they are calling around looking for a new daycare. Sometimes a person will end up finding someone that charges even more than you do and they'll leave for the higher priced daycare because they are awed over the wonderful set up the person has. So it's very important not to give your clients reasons to look around. Some woman have more money than you or I could know what to do with and they set up these AWESOME huge playgrounds indoor and out and some of the rest of us could never compete. But compete we must in one way or the other.

Marda is right. It really put them off to hear about your husbands job issues. They feel like they are paying for a service and it's not their problem to figure out how you are to survive. And to be fair, no one can survive on the pay from just one child. Can you have another child in Texas without being licensed? Or maybe you could consider licensing if your living arrangements meet the guidelines.

Lastly, about raising rates at all.. I almost never raise any rates no matter what. I belong to daycare groups all over the USA and even some other countries. These woman talk about raising their rates every single year. Every year I see them complaining that they lost 1-2 clients and then they are scrambling to get the money to advertise for more. Let's say the person has 6 kids in their care and they lose 2. The increase of 5 bucks per WEEK they were going for only increases them 20 bucks from the 4 that stayed. But they lose 100 bucks or week or so TIMES 2 from the families that didn't stay. If it takes them a month or two to get those 2 vacancies filled, the money they lost isn't going to be easily recovered. Now the raise has effectively lowered their income for the year when it's all said and done. It's hard enough to replace people when a child goes to school or a parent loses a job. The last thing you want to do is lose them for money.

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You were given lots of great suggestions. I have a home daycare and have been doing it for 17 years. First suggestion is to check around and see what centers and home daycares are charging, be sure to ask them about hours, what is included in their fee, vacations and paid holidays, and on call/drop in rates. To suddenly raise rates by $5 a day is a lot, especially for the reasons you gave. I raised my rates my $5 a day to 2 families last Sept, each family has 1 child and they were using my daycare 1-2 days a week, sometimes less, so I felt it was justified, and if they didn't like, they were free to find someone else. Did your husband's hours get cut or just the pay? Perhaps he could find a second job, you could take in more kids, you could get a second job or start a home business.

I think once you check out flexible schedules and drop in rates, the $5 increase won't seem so bad to the parents. I think the on call thing could be discussed. Perhaps you could agree on getting paid a set # of days per week, so you could budget better. The best thing for you is to have a home business or advertise for another child.

S.
www.LiveYourDreamsAtHome.com

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Eh. Yeah, you're asking a little much for our area. I was charging $25/day for childcare 2 years ago. They could easily find that rate around you so I'd take the $25/35 you're making now. If you'd like to make more $, why not take on an extra child?

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It totally depends on location, but here in my Chicago area the going rate is somewhere between $200-$325/week. Some areas, such as yours in TX, may be much lower, but that person would have multiple kids to make up for it. When I was doing home daycare I charged $225/week per child for full time care. I had set hours 8am-6pm and they paid $225 a week no matter if they were here or out sick or on vacation. The only time they don't pay is if I took a day off and did not provide backup childcare. That only happened maybe 2-3 times in about 5 years--when I was very sick and could not open. If this is the only child you are watching, then honestly you could be making better money dunking fries at the local McDonalds. You also have no health benefits or vacation pay. You need to take an honest look at your situation and decide what will and won't work for you and your family. Be fair to yourself, don't leave it to the family's to give you what you deserve. It still shocks me what people expect to pay to have you take care of the most "precious" people in their lives.

BTW--these people sound like jerks. Why bring up the car gas--what does that have to do with you? If they don't want to drive their child over, they would get a nanny to come to them. And trust me it would cost them about four times more!

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I am responding before I read the responses so I repeat something I am sorry. THAT LADY HAS LOST HER MIND, no way can she find decent childcare for less than what you charge. Much less not make her pay for for a solid 5 days and Holidays. PLUS YOU BEING AVAILABLE ON WEEKENDS AND FLEXABLE WITH YOUR TIME. All my girls were taken to an in home child care till they started Pre-K. I paid $150 a week, for 5 days - 7-5. If a Holiday fell within the week or if my child was sick, I still paid for the entire week. She got 2 weeks vacation a year. I did NOT have to pay her for this time. I also got 2 weeks a year and I did not have to pay her while we were gone.

Compaired to the rules and prices of a regular daycare I considered that a steal. Plus my children loved her and she had them reading by the time they went to Pre-K. The only reason we did Pre-K was because I wanted my kids in the school environment to get them ready for kindergarten.

Sounds to me like you are giving her a deal. Stick to your guns and do not back down, If she does start shopping around for a new daycare shes going to be in shock of actually what a great deal you are offering her.

One more thing. REALLY, the Gas was an issue, this is crazy, she would have to drive for child regardless. I'm sorry, but these people dont sound like they are very nice to begin with.

Good Luck

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I pay $225 per week for 7:30 to 5:30 pm care. For that I get all organic baby food prepared for my child, if my child wore regular diapers they would be provided (we use cloth), structured activities, etc. I'm paying not just for care, but for a granola crunchy environment that keeps with my child rearing values.

When you think about your situation, you need to think more broadly than just- what do I need to get my bills paid now. You need to ensure you have a plan that will mean you are not bound to the one infant currently in your care. Things to consider:

1. What value you add over others? (an example you provided was your willing to be on call)
2. What qualifications do I posess? (Do you have any early childhood certifications, liscensing, etc?)
3. What market am I catering to? As I mentioned before, I pay for a "granola crunchy environment", others pay for Montessori/educationally intensive environment, while others simply want the lowest cost provider.
4. How committed to this are you? If you are committed, start doing research on others payment policies. Most higher market places I no require payment before services are provided. I provide a check every Monday morning for the week.

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I think you're being too nice.

These clients would have to pay for gas, regardless where they took their kid.

Most places we interviewed, particularly home daycares, charged more for kids under age 1 (and even more for very young babies).

I think you need to be paid up-front, and that they can have X hours per week for that up-front fee (most places around us said 26 hours or less was pt daycare, with a slightly higher daily rate, and 40-50 hours per week was full time, with a set daily full time rate). Some places have a "late fee"--if I say I'll pick my kid up at 5, if I don't then I'm charged a high hourly rate till the kid is picked up.

Don't discuss your reasoning (that you're raising rates because your husband's hours are cut), unless you really know the clients and really trust that they are understanding good people. Instead, run it like it's a business, and let them know that that is just how is it. Do let them know that you understand that the cost of everything is going up and it may be a little harder on them, but that you are running a service and a business, and that you have to keep on top of your expenses.

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i would let them know that since you are basically on call all the time and cant schedule your week that you dont feel asking for a small increase is asking too much. it would be one thing if you had set hours but you are constantly inconvenienced which is something that they would never get away with at a home daycare . maybe they think they are paying a little more but they are getting one on one care and a home day care would not be so in the end they are getting a bargain.

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I'm in MA outside of boston - i was paying $60 a day. that was anywhere from 7am - 5PM. i paid for the day - regardless of if i picked up earlier or not....

it maybe too late to change anything with your current family..... instead of raising your rate, try getting them to commit to a set number of days/hours - say that you need that to make it worth your while.

as for the cost of gas - that is there problem to deal with - that shouldn't factor into the amount they pay you.

are they friends of yours? it sounds like you have a relationship other than just watching their child. i find those are the hardest to manage.

you could try to post ads for another child to watch and then when you find someone, it won't matter if they decide to leave or not.

call your state - i found a website that i could enter my zip code in and it gave me a list of state certified in home daycare's in my area - call them and find out their going rates?

how are you/they claiming it for taxes - are you certified by the state? tell them current rates if under the table or your new rates if they want to claim it on their taxes.

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Let me start with I live outside of chicago. In our area you will not find daycare for the price your quoting. The going rate is much higher. I stopped doing daycare about 10 years ago and charged $145 a week then for a 45 hour week. Your client is nuts. The going rate for daycare is way more than $25 a day. Tell them that you have thought about it and you are not going to be able to be used as a slave anymore. The average cost for somewhere like kindercare which is a daycare center who's hours are from 6:30am to 6pm is closer to $45 a day. but the average daycare home charges between $160 and @200 per day for a basic 40 hour week. or $8 per hour. So if you have this kid 9 hours a day times 4 days a week you are at the 45 hours a week mark and your doing daycare for less than $3 an hour. and also just a side note anyone under 12 months is considered infant and the rates for that are aproximately $50 a week more until they hit the 2 year old room. daycare homes do not base the rates on hours open but hours you have the kid. THEY ARE TAKING ADVANTAGE OF YOU BIG TIME!!!!

having said that I agree with previous posters you need to state the change in policy because the rate of $2.50 an hour is not enough. Do not mention your husbands pay cut etc.

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I cannot believe you get paid so little!!! I guess it must be a small town but it still seems like little money for the work. The gas they use to get the baby to your house has nothing to do with you. You don't charge them for the electricity the baby "uses" while at your house do you? I think they are being very petty and if they really could find another cheaper daycare that allowed them to be "on call" all week without paying then I'm sure they would. I think they have a good deal with you and they know it. Maybe you could ask for a compromise--- $30.00 for normal days and stay at $35.00 for long days? Just a thought. Good luck!!!

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I live outside of Dallas and pay $150 a week for my 7 month old. I consider that CHEAP compared to other inhome daycares and actual daycare facilities. I dop off around 7 and my daughter gets picked up between 4-5:30. Payment is always due on Friday before the next week and i pay for days shes not there and holidays. Its the least i could do for my daughters caregiver! good luck!

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I called around and priced corporate and home day cares in our area - N. Fort Worth/Keller. Corporate day care was pretty set at $215 a week for a 1 year old and ranged from $165 to $185 for a 4.5 almost 5 year old not in kindergarten yet because of a December b-day. That was full time from 7-6.
Home day care around us from the few responses I got was anywhere from $180 to $225 a week but that was for 5 days and until 5:30 at most. I honestly think the couple you're babysitting for is getting a great deal and I don't really understand the threat they're posing on you, they don't sound very nice especially after they agreed to the increased pay. The average home daycare is calculated for 5 days a week and not flexible in their hours like you are and very few I have come across go until 6 - mainly because they have families too. As far as the gas cost I'm sorry but that's just WRONG ummm...how would their 7 month old get to any other daycare? Unfortunately, while I understand you really might need to increase the pay I think you are stuck for now.

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In Oklahoma the state pays about $22-30 per day for an infant. That is in a licensed child care facility. Depending on their STAR rating they get more money or their county, some counties are considered to be rural and others not.

So, if they were to put their child in a child care center in Oklahoma they would have the benefit of a licensed facility, a teacher who has a professional degree, a staff of people who have specific training to take care of children of all ages, Regular inspections to verify that the minimum standards were at least being met....

The average amount of time a child is expected to be in care is about 10 hours. For example, the parents work 8-5, that's 9 hours and then travel time to and from work.
All in all, I would advise you to call around and get some prices for child care rates and see what the centers are charging then go with less. You can watch another child without getting registered and that would double your income. That is what makes the living for most home care givers, multiple children. If you are charging $25.00 a day for 2 kids that's $50 per day and that covers your expenses. If you get registered too you can be on food programs and get reimbursed for some of your food costs. In Oklahoma it's called the Dixie food program or something close to that.

http://www.dfps.state.tx.us/Documents/Child_Care/Forms/CC...

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I guess it depends on what the going rate is where you live. I am 1.5 hours from NYC and I paid $25 a day when my 15 year old was a baby! So if it was me, I'd expect to pay more now but things may just cost less where you live.
I think you made a mistake by telling the parents you are raising your rates because your husband's check is cut. That was not professional, sorry. They do not need to make up the cost of your husband's pay cut. You are raising your rate because you have been charging the same thing for a period of time and are raising your rates to match those of other providers in the area. You don't need to worry about the gas they use, that's their responsibility. Sounds like they are trying to bully you by saying they could take her to any daycare .... not that they would. Now that they know you are having financial problems, they know they can hold you hostage, you need the income - you really shot yourself in the foot by disclosing that. Stand your ground, but do not mention your financial problems, those are your problems, not your customer's. Be professional and let them know what your new rates are, based on what other daycares charge. Do not ask them if it is "okay." Simply state that as of February first, your new rate is $____.

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My daycare provider charges me $135 a week, from 1:30pm to 11pm. For dayshift she charges $110. For me, it's $27 a day. And I pay even if my daughter doesn't go. She also gets paid holidays if they fall during the week.

Shes state licensed and I get to write off up to a certain amount on my taxes.

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I think your rates should be raised. 7 1/2 years ago my friend charged $40.day for 730am to 5pm. So it is time for your to raise rates.

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Rates vary *enormously* by region. In ours group infant care is $1600 a month, one on one (or 1 family only) is about $2500. The price stays the same until potty trained. Then it drops to about $1000 a month. Once the kids are in school, however, prices go up again. For 4 hours a day 5 days a week through the YMCA $1700, and 8 hour no school day care is $80 a day. And that's the Y! Most other places are $100+ per day. (Every SAHP I know save 4 SAH because they cannot afford to work). To know, however, everything out here is similarly expensive. 1/2 gallons of milk are $4, lunchmeat is $10 per lb, average 2b/1ba home is half a million, private schools ( k12) are $15k-$25k, etc. Head an hour in any direction and prices drop by 25% on average.

To find the going rate in your area call 50-100 daycares in a 20 mile radius. That's what I did when I was looking for daycare/preschool. Got a short list of 60 I could afford and visted over 50 of them.

You did "goof" a little when going into what your reasons are for raising your rates. That's the difference between a professional relationship and a friendship relationship. The lines can get a little blurry with childcare. I would take this as a learning expereince and start developing a packet of info / policies for the future / future families including policies, notice of rate increase, etc. There's a lot of good info on the web for such policy packets.

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I live in a small town on I work 12hrs a day rotating shifts, my daughter is now in school so i dont have the daycare expense but when she went to day care i have had her in home care and licensed facility they are charging 16.50 day for home care and 15 day for licensed care. Now my sister is looking for a day care and she is only haveing my niece in 3 days a week and they are charging her 16.00 day for full time, part time it would be like 26.00 a day so hope this helps.

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I pay 175/week, no exceptions, pay for days I'm there and days I'm not. that averages out to 35/day. Every daycare I've talked to, you have to pay for the whole week, whether you're there or not. we get 2 weeks unpaid, and she gets 2 weeks paid vacation.

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I agree with Sue H. Daycare is a business, and has nothing to do with your personal issues. Watching their child requires the same work. Your husband's income loss and oyur taxes are not the baby's parents responsibility or fault - not do they care. They're worried only about their child, as it should be.

My suggestion is to keep the rate as it was, in order to keep an income. Taking on another child may be your best bet. Or have you or your husband find a second job. This family uses you "on-call". If you start to take the "on-call" aspect away from them, they may leave too. That is one thing I needed when my son as smaller, and I would have left a place if they were not able to provide me with flexible drop off.

Good luck.

Updated

I agree with Sue H. Daycare is a business, and has nothing to do with your personal issues. Watching their child requires the same work. Your husband's income loss and oyur taxes are not the baby's parents responsibility or fault - not do they care. They're worried only about their child, as it should be.

My suggestion is to keep the rate as it was, in order to keep an income. Taking on another child may be your best bet. Or have you or your husband find a second job. This family uses you "on-call". If you start to take the "on-call" aspect away from them, they may leave too. That is one thing I needed when my son as smaller, and I would have left a place if they were not able to provide me with flexible drop off.

Good luck.

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Really? You are taking care of their child and they are balking at $5.00 more per day? I bet if they took their lunch to work they could come up with the $5.00. While they are at work worry free - you are trying to take care of their child and making sure that their child is safe.
You are a child care provider and yes you DESERVE to be paid what you feel is fair. I would gladly pay the extra $80 per month if I knew my child was being well taken care of.
I work full time and am grateful for our daycare providers. My child is safe, happy and looks forward to being with her friends and the daycare workers are like her second family. Good luck, Daycare providers are so underappreciated for all of the hard work that they do.

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I suggest that one reason they're challenging you by citing the cost of gas is that the reasons you give for raising the price are your husband's pay getting cut and saving for taxes. Those two have nothing to do with taking care of their child. Why is $25/$35 enough last week and not enough this week for doing the same amount of work. Just as the cost of gas has nothing to do with you caring for their child except that they will have the same cost for gas no matter who cares for their child. Perhaps they would question the raise less if your reasons were related to actual child care.

I don't know what the going rate is in your area and so can't comment on whether or not it's reasonable for you to ask for the increased amount. At the most you've watched this baby for 7 months. Nothing has changed as far as what it takes to care for the baby and most people do not get a raise within 6 months of being hired unless they've included a raise in their initial wage agreement.

You can compare your price with others by answering ads and by checking rates on Department of Human Services Child Care Internet site. It does sound like they've checked. I would consider the possibility that they'll take the baby somewhere else.

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We send my son to a licensed in-home daycare. She charges $100/week for part time (3 days/week) and $135/week for full time care. She is open from 6:30am-5:30pm. The rates are the same regardless of the number of hours per day he comes (basically if he walks in the door, it counts as a day). Our son goes part time but on the rare occasion we need an extra day, the charge is $35 for drop in, the arrangements are made at least a week in advance, and are paid for on that day. We have a contract that we sign at the beginning of every year and pay a $50 enrollment fee at that time as well. Parents of infants provide formula, diapers, wipes, and baby food for their child. For children on table food, she provides breakfast, lunch, and 2 snacks.

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I am not going to read all of the responses right now, but here's my experience. I had my kids in home care for several years. Their provider had over 15 year of experience doing this. Her policy was, whatever she charged you when you enrolled your kids was what you always paid her. New "clients" (for lack of a better word), would pay whatever increase she felt was necessary at that time. That makes it a little more fair to people that have been loyal to you. Many of them may have had their pay cut as well so you are asking them to make a choice between their loyalty to you and less expensive care. By the way, I paid $20 a day, and the most she charged was $30 for 7 am - 6 pm. $40 a day (even for a "long" day seems like a lot). But it all depends on where you live and the going rate in that area.

1 mom found this helpful

I pay $25 per day for a 2.5 y/o. She is open from 7 am - 5:30 pm and charges per day, not different amounts for longer/shorter days. We pay her regardless if my son is there or not and we also pay her for holidays.

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I dont think you are asking for too much just knowing the kids are comfortable there would make me pay the extra 5. I also paid a home day care it was 35 for a long day but i had to pay for sick days and when she closed for vacations i didnt like the idea of it but my son liked her and i knew he was in good hands to me that alone is worth so much!

How many kids are you watching? If it's just the one then you are a nanny not a day care and should charge $10-15 an hour. If they think you asking for $5 a day is outrageous, it's time to share with them what the going rate is for nannies.

I'm not sure where you live, but I think your rate sounds very reasonable! I have an in-home nanny who I pay $12/hour to when 2 of my kids are home and $14/hour when my oldest is home from school. The gas for them to bring her to your house is ridiculous, I think! I also think they are very lucky to have such flexibility to have you on-call . . . I can't imagine most other providers would offer that? If I were you, I'd ask around about other home daycares (from friends or other contacts) and verify what the going rate is. I don't think it's fair, though, to base your rate on needing more money due to your income situation . . . it really has to be based on the service provided and how it compares to other day cares in your area.

Wow, I need to find you as my baby sitter! Honestly, for all that you do, you are charging way too low, IMO! I live in the Northeast and for a child less than one, I am looking at $65-70 a day. Average $300-350 dollars a week.

A good quality day care that is open 12 hours a day charges about $60 a day where I am, and you pay whether you drop the kid off or not. What you are offering is a practically giving it away and I cannot see how this couple cannot see this. OMG, what a gift -- if I was the parent I would snatch up that rate in a heartbeat.

Since you need the income, don't push the issue too much for now, but advertise yourself at a higher rate. Understand that for a child less than one, a good quality home day care is a treasure -- your child is ill less since he is not at day care and it is one on one care. I wish I could have found that when my little one was a baby, but even after offering to pay upwards of $70 a day, I could not find someone available in my area whom I could trust. So, advertise yourself as such -- you may want to try a sitter site to promote yourself. Once you find a better deal, then you can give that other family a month's notice that you will no longer be available for child care.

I second Amy D on the Keller prices. that is where i am and I ran a large childcare center in keller up until 2 years ago.

I will say though most day cares raise prices $3-5 every August and not the beginning of the year.

another way to get prices for your area is to go to http://www.dfps.state.tx.us/child_care/about_child_care_l... put in your zip and call a few of the inhome childcares and ask their rates and policies.

plus they need to pay if they dont show up.

I charge from infant to age 2 and potty trained $150 a week then it is $125 from 2 and potty trained till they start school

We pay $40 / day, take our son to the sitter's house, provide all of his food, clothing, diapers, etc. He's there from 7am - 4:15pm.

I've paid anywhere from 185-165 a week. They were paid wether my kids were there or not. She took one vacation a year unpaid, but we paid for sick days and holidays. They should be so lucky that you have been so flexible. You are worth it, to bad if they don't see it.

Don't put your raise in the beginning of the year, put it in the middle of the year.

I'll be honest...I did not read some of the post that did not come from around the Dallas/Ft.Worth area as all places are different. I have my daughter in an in home daycare in Richardson and pay $170/week. We pay regardless if she is there or not and holidays (days around the holidays if on the weekend). Payment is due first of the week. Our caregiver has a drop-off rate of $50/day if parents need it every once in a while but she does not provide part-time or on call daycare on a regular basis. Those of us who have our children with her are there on a regular basis.
Our daughter is 15 months old and we provide diapers and food. Caregiver will provide snacks and lunch when she is older and eating more. Caregiver takes 2 weeks paid vacation a year. When searching for a daycare this seemed to be the norm with in home daycares.
I value the care my daughter is getting and view this as worth every dime. You are providing a service and should be able to raise your rates to match the market. Even at $35/day this is below what most charge. They should be so lucky to find someone else who would charge that rate and still allow them to drop off as needed and not be charged the whole week. At the same time, I appreciated the point one previous post said of not changing the rates of existing care but going forward charge the higher rate. If the current situation only allows a few days a week maybe you could take on another baby.

The funny thing is... they said that you should add the cost of gas. What daycare does that? I wish I had known that when my child was in daycare! Sounds like they are just trying to bully you into not raising your rates. If their bosses said that they couldn't have a raise because the business needed credit for gas, they wouldn't be handling that very well! Right now you are only gett $3.33 an hour on a regular day. They need to think about these things, so perhaps you should bring these up with them. Good luck!

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