9 answers

What to Do with Teenage Runaway

I have my son who just turn 19yrs and his girlfriend is 16 or 17 and she has problems at home with her mom, the girls mom kick her out of the house and my oldest daughter went and pick her up at 2am in the morning when this happen. Problem is she brought her to my house cause my son went to get her, she did not have any where else to go, and the mother told my son to take that she didnt want her daughter at the house any longer but now the police is telling my son that he better not have her there with him cause she is a minor and a runaway but the mom doesnt allow her back. She even told police she didnt want her at the house any longer so now we dont know what to do?

What can I do next?

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If it were me, and I liked the girl, I would take her in to my house. I don't know the exact law, but I don't understand why you, as a grown woman, can't take her in. I've taken in my daughter's friends when they were having problems with their mother.

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Unfortunately you need to tell the police to come and get her or contact the Child Protective Services. This will not only protect you and your family but get their family the help they need.

Something else to consider, the bottom line is the same; however, you did not say why the Mother kicked her daughter out of her home at 2 am. Was she caught doing something the mother won't tolerate? Like sleeping in her home with somebody else, etc...So unless you have the complete story and not just the kids don't assume the woman is the one with the problem. You or anybody else that takes her in other than the legal system might just be the one's with the problem and now mom has found her solution. Obviously she cannot take more of it. Been there and definitely got the t-shirt.

1 mom found this helpful

If it were me, and I liked the girl, I would take her in to my house. I don't know the exact law, but I don't understand why you, as a grown woman, can't take her in. I've taken in my daughter's friends when they were having problems with their mother.

I agree with Marcy. Your son being 19 could get into a whole lot of trouble, legally, taking in a 16 or 17 year old girl. The mother doesn't sound stable to me and could make many accusations about him. You need to keep any misperception of what is going on to a minimum. If this young girl has had this much trouble in her life, a foster family might be the most stable thing she's seen.

God bless,

M.

Not sure, but I don't think it's good to aid and abet a runaway.. even IF the child has good reason to run..
In situations like this, I think social services need to be called. Having grown up in the fostercare/grouphome system by virtue of having inept parents, I can tell you it's no picnic, but on the other hand... do you think you are equipped to deal with someone who is having problems at home. Not saying you don't, but there is so much more to this than just a child running away.. DO know what you are getting into.. girlfriend or not. I would seek out some professional advice on this one.. .perhaps contact a social worker.. you could be getting you and your family into something bigger than you know.. I am not suggesting you don't support this girl and be a friend, but do understand boundaries...... things can get ugly fast...

I would contact the Police and CPS to find out what you can do to help. You want to make sure you're doing everything legally correct so that you are protected in case this "mother" gets any loopier. Good luck, and thank you for having a kind heart.

well the major factopr is age.i went through this with a friendgroing up her mom would beat her up kick her out and then call the cops saying she is a runnaway. after dealing with this several times the police told us some tricks and thing we could do to help my friend. first of all if she goes home even when parents arent home for just five minutes she isnt a runnaway anymore and can be gone 24 more hours second is her age if she is 17 she can legally move out of mothers home and nothing can be done about this if she is sixteen she needs to be emancipate. emancipation is done through the court and it basicly states the the minor is a legal adult before the age of 18 and can leave home enter into a binding contract and other things of that nature an adult can do other than buy tabacco products it is a little costly and the minor does need to prove she can support herself be it babysitting for room and board or whatever other way to support ones-self. or someone other than b/f can apply for gardianship with her being an older teen she has the right to opoint her own gardian thuis may be cheaper and easier. good luck with the situation. and to add onto to the omg shes a minor can get your oson into trouble the law is 16 plus four legal age of consent so the age thing isnt going to be a big deal other than harboring a runnaway.

I doubt that it is legal to "kick" a minor out of the house without making other arrangements. I know the girl is saying she doesn't want to go back, but if I were you I would think long and hard before allowing her to stay with you considering what your son has already been told by the police.
Not sure what the answer is, but I think she needs to go to Child Services.

M., I really want to see this one....are you asking for her or for you? Do you take the girl in? I would say not. That would be inviting trouble. I can't imagine the woman can get away with kicking her daughter out - unless she is emancipated. Then you have a different problem on your hands.

You can't turn her out, but you can't keep her. Possibly bring her to your church? Asking a (trusted) neighbor?
Good luck!
M.

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