36 answers

What's the Best Way to Teach the Abc's and 123'S to My Toddler?

Hello! Since I'm a first time mom and want to do everything I can for my daughter's education am wondering, whats the best way to teach my 19 month old her ABC's and 123's? She recognizes them and says a few letters and numbers from watching Elmo and Barney (which she absolutely loves, lol) but I want to help her expand that. I hear beween now and 3 years old is when they most absorb information, kinda like a sponge. I dont want her to just learn it from tv, I want to be involved in her education and would love to start right now if possible. Everyone has a different way of teaching it or at least introducing it so she/he is familiar with it, I'd love a few suggestions.

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through life. read to her (dr suess' ABCs is an excellent book) and point out letters, and count things with her (cheerios, stop signs, birds). period. a toddler does NOT need flashcards and formal lessons.
khairete
S.

4 moms found this helpful

We tried flash cards REALLY BIG hand made by my sister, but what actually got him singing his ABC's was Super Pig from Super WHY on PBS kids ... and numbers that is really just something you sneak in when you can like when plating food get a plate that has three sections and count how many foods can go on the plate and how many choices did mommy make for dinner (entree, veggie, fruit, bread, whatever it is) and help her count with you. Really just random times start counting and sining the alphabet song, just because she does not say it does not mean she does not absorb it.

2 moms found this helpful

by singing songs. As soon as they can remeber twinkle twinkle they can remember their phone number.Teach all those important numbers through songs.

1 mom found this helpful

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What toddlers are wired for at your daughter's age are play and language development – verbal, not written. But she'll grow the most, intellectually and emotionally, from all kinds of play. Free play, exploratory play, pretend play, active play, manipulative play, and more play. This is the baby's real "work." This is what allows the brain to develop properly. A focus on academic learning too early will take time away from real play.

If you want your baby to learn to read when she is ready, read to her, enjoy reading yourself, and talk to her about everything in slow, clear sentences. Count objects that you show her or give to her, find reasons to count up to ten (higher is useless and often confusing for kids under 3 or 4 years old). Don't use baby talk.

The single most accurate predictor of a child's success in school is a big vocabulary and the ability to use language well.

7 moms found this helpful

I wouldn't do ANY "formal" type "teaching" of letters OR numbers at this age. Everything needs to be fun and play. Do NOT "quiz" her on any of it either.
Keep everything fun and play. You can do "I Spy" (which are find the hidden object in the picture games, in book form) with her, instead of reading a "book" at naptime or bedtime, or in addition to. That will help expand her vocabulary too... because you'll have to explain to her what some of the objects are in order for her to find them! It can be really fun.

When she is eating, have her (you start and help model it) count out bites of food... "okay, after you have eaten 3 bites of ___ then you can be done." As she grows, add more bites! ;)

Make everything as finite as you can... don't use abstract counting... Count the number of blocks she can make into a tower without it falling... Count the number of colors of blocks she used. When you fold laundry, do you "pair up" socks? Count how many pairs of socks need to be put away.

As far as letters... just READ READ READ to her. As many stories as she wants! A love of reading comes from exposure to stories that she loves. Take her to the bookstore/library and let her pick out a few books and you pick out a few and then read them. Whichever ones she really likes, try to find similar type books. They don't have to all be filled with huge whole page pictures... some of my kids' favorites around age 2 were the Frog and Toad books. There are pictures, but they are very simple and not filled with lots of color. The STORIES are GREAT, though.. and if you use different voices for the Frog and the Toad the kids think they are SO much fun... They are 9 & 12 now and still pull those out sometimes, because they are funny...

5 moms found this helpful

through life. read to her (dr suess' ABCs is an excellent book) and point out letters, and count things with her (cheerios, stop signs, birds). period. a toddler does NOT need flashcards and formal lessons.
khairete
S.

4 moms found this helpful

My daughter is now 3 and at that age, she had a bunch of ABC books (Dr. Suess, Chicka Chicka ABC, etc.). She also had the alphabet letter magnets, wooden puzzles, foam letters that you can play with in the tub and alphabet place mats. And she watched Sesame Street as well as Super Why, another good show for learning letters and reading. We did not do flash cards or formal lessons in any way. I also read to her before nap time and bed time. She knew all her big letters by age 2 and the small ones at 2.5. She just seemed to naturally absorb it, and she was also very interested in finding and noticing letters everywhere when we were out and about (the McDonald's M, and K-Mart K, etc.).

I also got in the habit of singing the ABC song to her when I brush her teeth. Since they say you should take the same amount of time brushing your teeth as it takes to sing the ABC song. She picked it up quickly, AND it helps getting her to cooperate for brushing her teeth!

2 moms found this helpful

For both of my kids I would just count things as we come across them. Everytime we go up stairs I count the steps with them. When we get out of the car to go into the store we count the cars in parking spots on the way in. Anywhere I know they will identify what we are counting and recognize what we are doing, I try to take advantage.
For the ABCs, I started singing it every diaper change from when they were infants. My 3 year old was able to recite them at 2.5 (I don't know if that is late or early but beating other kids wasn't my goal). He now asks me about writing the letters and we just started to trace with our fingers different letter when we come across them on his toys or books.
Kids are naturally inquisitive so going with her cues with what interests her and adapting the "teaching" to that will help. good luck.

2 moms found this helpful

Repetition. Sing to her and talk to her counting and naming things as you see it.

2 moms found this helpful

We tried flash cards REALLY BIG hand made by my sister, but what actually got him singing his ABC's was Super Pig from Super WHY on PBS kids ... and numbers that is really just something you sneak in when you can like when plating food get a plate that has three sections and count how many foods can go on the plate and how many choices did mommy make for dinner (entree, veggie, fruit, bread, whatever it is) and help her count with you. Really just random times start counting and sining the alphabet song, just because she does not say it does not mean she does not absorb it.

2 moms found this helpful

First off, relax! At 19 months, she is waaaay too young for you to be worrying about her knowing letters and numbers! Introduce them in fun ways, counting songs and games and things. When you go to the store talk to her about everything "Hmm, we need 2 gallons of milk. 1, 2" as you put them in the cart. Or "this says aisle 1 - there's the 1." Or when you are bathing her, count her fingers and toes. Same thing with letters. Point them out when you see them, and play sound games. Things will come gradually - DO NOT expect her to know her letters and numbers before she is 3, probably not till she is 4. Same for colors. Talk about them as you experience them, make it part of your day. But don't expect her to know them before 3. Kids go through a natural progression of development, right now she should be learning speech (through listening to you and interacting with you), letters and numbers and colors come later (and she'll recognize them before she can name them).

And read, read, read. 20 minutes every day. Put her on your lap and let her touch and see the book. Make it a real interaction. Kids learn sooooo much about books and reading and words and letters by being read to every day... so much more than flash cards or "your baby can read" gimmicks!

Again be patient. I know its tempting to push her into knowing all these things early, especially when we see adds or hear from other parents about how their baby was reading at 2 (whatever....). Learning must be FUN!!!

2 moms found this helpful

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