17 answers

What Do They Learn in Kindergarten

What do your kids learn in kindergarten that they have not already learned in preschool (if they have gone to one). If a child starts preschool at say 3/4 years old, then how much color, shapes, numbers and letters can they learn that will again be repeated in kindergarten. I think 2-3 years learning just that is a bit repetitive especially if the child is older or smarter. What is different in kindergarten?

1 mom found this helpful

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

My son learned how to read, how to count by 2's 5's and 10's to 100, how to do simple addition and subtraction, and how to function well in a classroom environment by following a routine. He did not go to preschool, kindergarten was his first introduction to "regular" school. We did preschool at home with mommy and daddy and he loved it!

1 mom found this helpful

in my sons kindergarten they are learning to recognize some words, how to sound them out and beginning reading. that is the one big different I see this year from last year

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

They will learn some reading, some writing, some math, some science. They will also learn to follow directions, to stay on schedule and how to work with other children. Formal PE, Formal Music, Formal Art and Spanish is offered at this school.

They will hopefully also become more independent..
They did not give out real homework in our daughters kinder classes, but the children were taught to bring and take home their backpacks every day.. To have their parents look and sign their work, to return handouts, to walk into the classroom quietly hang up and put away their things to get ready for the day. To be prepared.

To prepare for lunch follow lunch room rules, get their own lunches in line, to purchase then open their own milk.. To clean up after themselves.

How to walk in a line, how to keep their hands to themselves, how to sit and listen to a whole story. How to raise their hands with a question, to wait their turn..

To play on the playground to get along, to speak up for themselves..

They should know their colors, shapes, how to say the alphabet how to count up to 30..How to spell their name. Some will be there and some will just be getting there.. Some children will already read and do some writing.. Not perfectly...

It is not just giant playtime. They have actual lesson plans and will need to meet goals.. The best part is at the end of the day, they will be hungry, so give them a small snack, they will play a little, they will eat dinner and then they are ready for bath and sleep! They will grow so much taller that fall, you will end up purchasing new shoes by Thanksgiving.. It is a magical time for them..

4 moms found this helpful

Kindergarten is more academic now - often kids are already expected to know letters, numbers, etc. before starting because they may start working on reading, writing, simple adding and subtracting, etc. If you want to know about kindergarten programs in your area (public schools, private, etc.) you might want to visit some of them and ask them what their curriculum consists of, and what they expect the kids to learn by the end of the year before going on to first grade.

3 moms found this helpful

I would suggest that you talk with some of your family or friends that have/had kids in kindergarten recently. What kids learn in K. vary from district to city to state, but it is much more than what they learned 5 or 10 years ago. Most people in the education world see kindergarten as the new 1st grade. I teach kindergarten and the end of the year expectations are what I was expected to learn in 1st grade. Now kids are learning to read, write complete sentences, and do simple addition and subtraction number stories to name just a few of the expectations. I am also seeing an increase in children who need to develop their social skills. The social-emotional area is a key element to any good kindergarten classroom.

In my district kids are behind the group if they do not know most of the letters of the alphabet, the basic shapes, numbers to 10 or 20, and how to write their name when they begin kindergarten. That is basically where we start, and the kids who do not have that knowledge are playing catch up all year.

Children who come in reading and writing sentences may be a little bored in K. unless the teacher is skilled in differentiating instruction. It is a fine line between being prepared and being overly prepared, but usually a teacher can meet an advanced student's needs. And often the academically advanced student needs work on social skills or other social or emotional areas. I don't know why, but it is not uncommon for the academically advanced k. student to need extra help with getting along with their peers.

I hope this helps...I would check with the schools in your area to know what is expected of an incoming kindergartener, and what is the end of the year expectation.

3 moms found this helpful

I used to be a Kindergarten teacher and I know that they learn alot more than what they learn in preschool- Knowing your letters, shapes and colors are just the fundamentals they need in order to succeed in Kindergarten. They begin to learn letter sounds and beginning words. They also begin to learn how to put their thoughts into a simple sentence. By the end of Kindergarten, your child should be able to read and write 100 sight words. They should be on a Level 4 reading level and should be writing 3 sentences on their own. They also should know how to count to 100 and do simple computations. Kindergarten is so important and is often not taken seriously, but it is a very important year in a child's educational life.

3 moms found this helpful

Preschool is has become what kindergarten use to be. Children are now leaving Kindergarten reading, writing simple paragraphs and adding and subtracting simple sums. Preschool should really be mandatory these days since a child entering K without preschool (or parents providing at home instruction) enter already below grade level. Can they catch up, sure, but why make school so difficult?

3 moms found this helpful

Can you clarify the reason for your question? Are you asking if it is worth while to do preschool?

There is the repetition with colors, shapes, and numbers between prek and K. However, there is more phonetic awareness and reading in kindergarten than in prek. The Kindergarten teachers in our school did team teaching where they could do small reading groups based upon skill level. I found the harder levels more challenging than what my daughter got in 1st grade for the whole classroom. There was a lot of journal writing. For math, it was creating patterns, graphs, and basic adding and subtracting using manipulatives. They were also expected to work a lot more on their own.

I volunteered in the kindergarten class at my kid's school. What I observed, was that there was a broad range of skills independent of whether or not the child had been in preschool. Socially, you could tell the difference between kids that had been in preschool and kids who had not. The kids who had been in some type of preschool had a better ability to concentrate and work in a classroom than the others. This was really important when it came time to do individual work. I think this was less obvious towards the end of the year. It didn't make the kids that did not have preschool less bright. It just meant they might not have been as ready to learn in that type of structured environment.

Updated

Can you clarify the reason for your question? Are you asking if it is worth while to do preschool?

There is the repetition with colors, shapes, and numbers between prek and K. However, there is more phonetic awareness and reading in kindergarten than in prek. The Kindergarten teachers in our school did team teaching where they could do small reading groups based upon skill level. I found the harder levels more challenging than what my daughter got in 1st grade for the whole classroom. There was a lot of journal writing. For math, it was creating patterns, graphs, and basic adding and subtracting using manipulatives. They were also expected to work a lot more on their own.

I volunteered in the kindergarten class at my kid's school. What I observed, was that there was a broad range of skills independent of whether or not the child had been in preschool. Socially, you could tell the difference between kids that had been in preschool and kids who had not. The kids who had been in some type of preschool had a better ability to concentrate and work in a classroom than the others. This was really important when it came time to do individual work. I think this was less obvious towards the end of the year. It didn't make the kids that did not have preschool less bright. It just meant they might not have been as ready to learn in that type of structured environment.

3 moms found this helpful

My son was reading by mid-year in Kindergarten.
And doing basic math problems.
It's not just numbers, colors and letters by any means!

My son went to nursery school at 3, pre-school at 4 and he was still challenged in K.

2 moms found this helpful

My daughter is in kindergarten. They aren't even being taught upper-case letters - its assumed that they already know those and are just doing lower case. They are doing more complex shapes (hexagon, rhombus) and pattern work. They are learning a little bit about historical figures (Martin Luther King, the Pilgrims, etc). She is working on writing - she just wrote a "book" with several sentences of her own writing to go with her pictures. She's starting to read too - I bet she'll be able to read some easy books on her own within the next couple of months. We're a pretty "academic" family (I teach HS) and she couldn't do any of these things before the start of the year, even though she had gone to a very good pre-k program just the year before.

2 moms found this helpful

1 / 3
Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.