10 answers

What Do They Do to Test for RSV?

Ok so i asked earlier today advice on my lil girl being sick for so long ... and I'm going to call my doctor tomm morning to set an appt to go in and get her tested for RSV. my question is what do they do to test the babies for RSV? Do they take their blood? .....

oh and thank you so much to all the moms that responded to me earlier!!!! it helps to know that other moms have gone through what kylie and i are going through .. thanks again :)

What can I do next?

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My daughter had RSV. They said they were just suctioning her nose...I didn't even realize they were swabbing her for the mucous. But, she was not admitted. I lost sleep for two nights since I was constantly watching her breathing and had her sleep upright in her carrier so she wouldn't lay flat. She is fine now!

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Hi L., my name is J. and I am a nurse. The way you test for RSV is by obtaining a swab of the nose. Kylie will not like it when it is done, because it goes all the way back into the nose and should be swabbed for about 30 seconds. I do this a lot!

RSV (Respiratory Syncytial Virus) is more common in infants and children. Some symptoms include low-grade fever and a croupy barking cough. Not all babies who have RSV are admitted. It is to the discretion of the physician. That is all I can pretty much tell you without stepping over my boundries.

Try to keep your baby from very busy,crowded places if at all possible through out the rest of the winter.

Good Luck, Jess

My little boy got RSV in Nov at 6months old. It started with high fevers and a really snotty nose. Then we went down hill from there. When we went to the hospital to get tested they squirted some fluid into his nose and sucked it out. We tested positive immediately and they admitted us. We were in the hospital for 6 days. He had a strain that would not respond to medicine. Finally on the the 4th day after it moved to pnuemonia they found some medicine that would work. They treated him with breathing treatments and constant sucking of the fluid in his nose. We finally went home and have been on an inhaler for asthma ever since. I hope everything turns out well. We made it through it, but it was hard seeing him soooo sick. But remember, these little babies are so strong that they can bounce back from anything.

My daughter had RSV. They said they were just suctioning her nose...I didn't even realize they were swabbing her for the mucous. But, she was not admitted. I lost sleep for two nights since I was constantly watching her breathing and had her sleep upright in her carrier so she wouldn't lay flat. She is fine now!

my youngest almost had this. we barely kept him out of the hospital when he was a few months old with round the clock care that capped off in a very long weekend. but we did it and it was intense. you have my empathy!

I'm pretty sure it's just a swab test. I know they do it in the doctor's office so it's not invasive.

My son was a preemie born at 31wks, and I was paranoid for the longest time about his risk of getting RSV. There is a vaccine that can be given to the baby that will protect her, but I'm not sure how they decide if the baby is eligible or not. My son wasn't able to get it, even tho he was in the high risk category. His lungs were at normal development and he was only vented for 24hrs as precaution, so that might be why he couldn't get the vaccine. I would definitely ask the doctor about it - there's still a few more months left of the cold and flu season - I just keep holding my breath until we're in the clear!

I hope that she just has allergies and that everything will be okay for you!

This is going to sound a little nasty, when we were in the ER and moy son got tested they basically sucked a bunch of snot from his nose and tested it that way.

They did a nose swab on my son and I think they suctioned mucus out of his nose.

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