30 answers

Weaning from Breastmilk to Cow's Milk

I am starting to wean my 13 month old of her day-time nursings. I have been successful with the morning feeding, but not the afternoon. My doctor told me to give her whole cow's milk as a substitute, but each time I try and give it to her she gags and spits it out. has anyone else experienced this? What can I do to get her to like milk?

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It has been said that humans are the only species to continue to drink milk after the mother is finished breast feeding. Milk isn't supposed to be that good for us. Google this subject, maybe having breast milk avail is a better idea. I breast fed for 17 months with both of my boys while working at my business full time. they are hardley ever sick and when they were ready to stop breast feeding they did without any difficulty and went straight to solid foods. My oldest gagged on anything milk related when he was an infant. I was told by my doctor to give him First Start by Carnation (It has been a while that might be the wrong name), he immediately gagged and threw it up, I never tried again. L.

Try mixing it with expressed breast milk - start with mostly breast milk that she likes the taste of and start mixing more and more cow's milk in each successive feeding. It worked for my boys. Plus it used up some of the extra milk I had in storage in the freezer.

My daughter hated cows milk for a while. (no allergies) my friend suggested vanilla soy milk. She loved it and drank it for a couple months before getting used to cows milk a little at a time. She loves milk now and is almost 5.

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I wouldn't start something like quik, it's just not good for you. NEVER start a habit you don't wish to continue, it's too hard to break it later. I have three kids, none of whom drink milk and all are healthy and fine. Other dairy products will give them the fat, they don't need milk. Does it make sense that we need baby cow milk to survive? Every other creature never has milk again after weaning. Rice Dream vanilla tastes VERY similar to breast milk. It is low in fat, so you can't count on the beneficial fat you might be looking for, but if you just want her to drink fluids, it tastes just the same, quite amazing! Good Luck

I put chocolate or strawberry quik in the milk to help them start, just like a small teaspoon.

JMHO, but why give her cows milk? there are good healthy juices, and water, and food. My younger daughters learned to do without nursing till I got home, they were simply not offered anything but food, and cup of juice or water. They did not even get puddings with cows milk until well after 2yo (they did get yogurt and cheese on occasion). I M not millitant nurser, but my first weaned early, got cows milk based formula, came out fine eventualy, but she had MANY many ear and sinus infections until she was 6 or so. My second nursed for almost 3 years, but the last year or so she mostly only nursed at night or when she was sick. My youngest has some major milk fat sensitivity, and digestive problems now, they did not show up until she was 8 or 9.
Sorry for the long history, but they survived ok without Milk at such a young age. There are to many concerns about it being introduced to kids SO young

E.

Hi J.,
My daughter wasn't thrilled with the switch either, so I would pump and mix the milks, at first 4 oz. breat milk and 2 oz cow's milk and every week I would up the mix. She drinks the cow's milk now but still prefers it warm, we're currently working on that! Good luck!

It has been said that humans are the only species to continue to drink milk after the mother is finished breast feeding. Milk isn't supposed to be that good for us. Google this subject, maybe having breast milk avail is a better idea. I breast fed for 17 months with both of my boys while working at my business full time. they are hardley ever sick and when they were ready to stop breast feeding they did without any difficulty and went straight to solid foods. My oldest gagged on anything milk related when he was an infant. I was told by my doctor to give him First Start by Carnation (It has been a while that might be the wrong name), he immediately gagged and threw it up, I never tried again. L.

My daughter hated cows milk for a while. (no allergies) my friend suggested vanilla soy milk. She loved it and drank it for a couple months before getting used to cows milk a little at a time. She loves milk now and is almost 5.

I found this link that covered a lot of your concerns:

http://www.ucsfhealth.org/childrens/edu/bottleWeaning.html

However, with my own children, both were lactose intolerant when milk was introduced into their diets. So I gave them fortified soy milk and the habit stuck. They both enjoy the soy as do I AND they get more protein than cow's milk could give them. They do now eat yogurt and cheese with little issue, but have to ingest lactaid supplements when they eat ice cream. Not a real big deal though.

Also, I would NEVER add a flavored mix to milk. Milk already has natural sugars in it, all you would be adding is hollow calories and more sugar, sugar, sugar, thus major cavities down the road. Why start your daughter on a habit of getting used to drinking sweet drinks? I wouldn't want to start a habit that I would have to break later on. Just a thought.

Good luck!

She may not tolerate dairy well. try soy milk, it is fortified also.

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