49 answers

Upper Case or Lower Case Alphabet First??

I am going to start working on my son everyday learning all the letters of the Alphabet. He turned 4 in September and knows a couple but I really need to start an everyday routine with him. I didn't know though should you start working with the upper case alphabet first or the lower case? Or both at the same time? It seems confusing to him so far to work on both. I just wasn't sure how they do it when you get into kindergarten and what would be better??
Any words of advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

4 moms found this helpful

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Featured Answers

Go to Wal-mart and spend $10 to buy Leap Frogs Letter Factory DVD. Then buy the Leap Frog Fridge magnets. They both use the same little song to teach letters. My son knew all his letters and sounds at 20 months. It only took him a few weeks to catch on. We also had those foam letters to play with in the tub. It was easy and fun.

2 moms found this helpful

i taught kindergarten before staying at home and i agree with the suggestions to only work on one letter a week. (both upper and lower together) Do lots of tactile things like drawing in shaving cream, or tracing the letter on sandpaper. Do a scavenger hunt for things that start with that sound. You don't have to go in order, start with the letters in his name. Teach him to write his name with the first letter upper the other lower!!! makes life easier when he gets to school.

1 mom found this helpful

1. I love the talking letter factory by Leap Frog (less than $10 at wal-mart). This progresses into the Talking word factory and the story book circus - fantastic little video trio that teaches letter recognition, the existence of upper and lower case letters, and true phonemics.

2. My son went to pre k intimately familiar with how to write the captials. He could read both upper and lower case (see number 1).

3. Now he's in K, and he can write lower case too.

It worked for us, and my 3 y o is following in his footsteps.

Good luck.
S.

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

Imo. I would start with both. I just know that from experience.

I have a 5 year-old in Kinder, right now. His teacher is teaching him, and his class the upper and lowercase at the same time.

But what I did since my son didn't go to Pre-K, which wasn't my choice, is I made sure he knew his full name, made sure he could recognize the numbers 1-10 by using his fingers, and could say the alphabet.

Teachers these days have a different way of teaching the kiddos. By all means, is probably the best way. I know that she has sent home papers about the proper way of writing... for instance, on the writing tablet with the line above and on the bottom, and in the middle is the dashed lines. The top is referred to as the sky, middle dashed lines are known as the fence, and the bottom line is called the ground.. Its really neat. So, the sky, fence, and ground. He has to know how to count to 100, without any help. He has to know how to write his name, the proper way. He has to know how to write each letter the right way and also the correct sounds of each letter... The for instance I gave you is the proper way, at least, the rules and guide-lines that my son has to follow from the education department.

Before Kinder, I didn't really teach him the writing part. He kinda picked it up during the summer before. If he seemed interested, then I taught him the knowledge I knew. Never did I say no! So, if your young'n wants to learn to write, so be it. Lol. Let him experience with that pencil!

Also, get the books that have color-by-number. Those are excellent. A great sorce of learning. Make him notice the colors and how the words are spelled. Then it also helps with the numbers. If the word says 2 are blue. Color the word blue, blue, for him so he notices the spelling of the word blue. I did, candy corns, or skittles.. 5+1=6 He got really interested in that one. I did cherrios. Lol. It was soo much fun, too!

Pre-K is just more like recognition, or experimenting with different learning tools for the children.

That's all I can think of right now..

Got anymore questions shoot them my way. Email me at ____@____.com, that's an easier way to get a hold of me, quick!

Hope I helped some!! Much Luck to his success!!! God Bless! =]

2 moms found this helpful

Definitely upper-case first. I highly recommend the video "Letter Factory" - it's a LeapFrog DVD, and it is GREAT! My twins (who are now 2 1/2) started watching that video at their babysitter's house when they were about 15 months old, and by the time my son was 19 months old, he could say identify every letter of the alphabet as well as the sounds for most. It was amazing - and it was very impressive "entertainment" at our family Christmas in 2007 right after. My daughter wasn't as interested in televisions at that age, so she was about 21 months old before learning all of them. Good luck with it all - learning is so much fun!

2 moms found this helpful

Go to Wal-mart and spend $10 to buy Leap Frogs Letter Factory DVD. Then buy the Leap Frog Fridge magnets. They both use the same little song to teach letters. My son knew all his letters and sounds at 20 months. It only took him a few weeks to catch on. We also had those foam letters to play with in the tub. It was easy and fun.

2 moms found this helpful

1. I love the talking letter factory by Leap Frog (less than $10 at wal-mart). This progresses into the Talking word factory and the story book circus - fantastic little video trio that teaches letter recognition, the existence of upper and lower case letters, and true phonemics.

2. My son went to pre k intimately familiar with how to write the captials. He could read both upper and lower case (see number 1).

3. Now he's in K, and he can write lower case too.

It worked for us, and my 3 y o is following in his footsteps.

Good luck.
S.

1 mom found this helpful

I have a bright three year old (almost 4 now) who demanded to start school when he was 2.5. At that point everyone he knew including his father were all starting school. I made him wait until he turned three but he was insistent.

We did a letter a week starting with D for his name. I have flash cards with no pictures. I believe that the kids memorize the pictures and not the letter. I am a former teacher and private tutor. I've seen it happen. They know the sound on the card with the picture. Then take the picture away and they get frustrated. My flash cards have only the lower case letters on them. I focused on the phonetic sound(s) the letters make. That same week I introduced the upper case with refrigerator magnets. He would match the upper case magnets with the lower case cards once a week. I only kept out the magnets for the letters we had learned, getting out a new one each week. That way we got upper, lower, and sounds. He loved running to the door to get a magnet and running back to the coffee table to match it to the cards. It kept everything active.

We also spent a lot of time brainstorming words that started with that week's letter sound. Friends' names, favorite toys, foods. Anything he was familiar with. Now we're on to the /ch/ so we say, "Ch, ch. Charles. Ch, ch, cheese. Ch, ch, chocolate. Ch, ch, Choo, Choo."

He did great and started reading hat, rat, ran, etc about two months ago. Two weeks ago he started reading the Bob books. Now he's on the second level and doing great. Teaching the sounds is the key.

I also made out little index cards with one three letter word each. This helped him learn to sound out words without pictures and without the expectation of reading a whole sentence. I would follow his cues. If he was having fun we'd do 10 or so in a day. If he was resistant or silly, we'd stop before five that day. So long as there were no tears or yelling, but plenty of fun.

Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

I taught Kinder before I stayed home. I taught upper & lowercase at the same time. I didn't use any special program to teach. I had a Word Wall in the classroom. We did a "chant" every day. Said the letter name, sound and the picture clue that is on the letter card. Ex: Aa /a/ apple. You are pointing to each letter, upper and lower as you say the name, put your hand to your ear as you do the sound and then point to the picture. You can go to any teacher store and find an alphabet. You do need to practice writing the letters as well. I did only work on writing one letter a day. Upper on one side of the paper and lower on the back. I had them write the letter in about 5 different colors just on top of each other. We called it rainbow writing. I didn't have a particular order that I did that in, but a good place to start would be the letters in your child's name. The Pre-K teacher at my school did this as well and those students were able to do it. The key is doing it daily and making it upbeat and brief. Of course we did much more throughout the day, but I'm not sure how much info you want. I do want to emphasize that it is not necessary to spend a lot of money or subscribe to a particular program to achieve results. If you want more ideas, feel free to email me. I will let you know that I taught "economically disadvantaged" and students whose 1st language was not english with 100% success. They ALL not only knew letters sounds, names, but could all read and write by mid year.

1 mom found this helpful

My son learned both at the same time at age 2 so I am sure your son at 4 could handle both together. Try using www.starfall.com to begin, then maybe move to the leap frog magnets. Also, if you are not averse to DVDs, Preschool Prep company has some good ones that teach upper and lower recognition. The DVDs are good with recognition but don't help with sounds like Starfall and the magnets do. Good luck. I bet he'll get them really fast!

1 mom found this helpful

i taught kindergarten before staying at home and i agree with the suggestions to only work on one letter a week. (both upper and lower together) Do lots of tactile things like drawing in shaving cream, or tracing the letter on sandpaper. Do a scavenger hunt for things that start with that sound. You don't have to go in order, start with the letters in his name. Teach him to write his name with the first letter upper the other lower!!! makes life easier when he gets to school.

1 mom found this helpful

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