6 answers

Thickening of the Sole of the Foot????

My husband has this odd thing with the sole of his feet. They are thickend like leather and crack something terrible.

We have a child a little girl and I have noticed that her feet where the big toe is and the bad under the big toe is starting to get the leather like feel and cracking look as well.

She has a dermatologist which I plan on making an apt with. For a man is might be over looked but for a girl this is something that might bother her when she grows up. If I can keep this from happening like her daddy i will do what ever i can.

She does not walk out doors with out shoes....and she is bare foot in the house. I lotion her body after every bath because of her ecezma.

Does anyone know what this is????

What can I do next?

More Answers

My podiatrist said that it is a fungus - the same one that causes athletes foot and yellowing and thickening of the toe nails. I vary between salicylic acid (to help with skin sloughing) and antifungal cream - and use a pumice stone every night after my bath.

It works well, but if I slack off for even a week the thick parts come back.

S.

1 mom found this helpful

I would imagine that this occurs because some people's skin doesn't slough off as well as others and with the ecezema, dry skin is an issue. The way to keep the buildup and cracking from being a problem is filing the feet. If I don't take a foot file to my feet nearly every day I experience the cracking. There are also products geared specifically toward the feet that help with moisturizer issues. I would focus on trying to make the foot care a fun beauty regimen, big girl stuff she can do for herself, because she is likely going to be coping with this all of her life and it sorta sucks after a while.

I have found that rather than doing the pumice in the bath, if you file them the minute you get out of the tub, it is easier to lose the dead skin and keep that build-up/cracking from happening. The filing is also important from the standpoint that once the heels in particular start cracking, it is virtually impossible to actually make them go away, the best you can do is try to keep it under control and not like those folks you see out and about and wish they had the decency to wear tennis shoes so you wouldn't have to see their dry, cracking mess of their heels, ew.

Everyone is different. My boys tend to get ingrown toenails because they get a calloused skin buildup on their big toes. Never had this with my daughter, just the boys. Sometimes the only thing to do is keep after stuff. With my boys, frequent trimming of the nails helps to skin build-up but I don't think there is a permanent fix for that just like there may not be one for your daughter other than you and she when she is older, being vigilant of foot care.

If this reminds you of her dad, she probably inherited the propensity for her feet to be this way.

1 mom found this helpful

Go see Dr. Leslie Campbell. She is a wonderful Podiatrist with offices in Allen and Plano. She's brilliant and I hear an excellent surgeon if you need one.

Dr. Campbell
###-###-####

I had the same problem for years - even when I went for a pedicure my feet would still crack. Now I've been using Arbonne's Herbal Foot Cream for the past 2 years and my feet haven't cracked at all anymore (I do walk around my house in bare feet). Arbonne has a Baby Oil that also might help that you could use under the lotion. https://www.arbonne.com/products/baby/oil.asp

Please feel free to contact me if you would like any more information or have any questions at all.

Good Luck!

I agree with the other poster, the skin doesn't slough off.

For your husband you might need to get him in for a pedicure. But if you can't, see if you can get him to start doing a pumice stone in the shower and then have him do this trick I use when I do spa parties .... at bedtime, have him wash his feet, then put on a good moisturizer on his feet, put storage bags (they're on the bag isle, and they're the size of the bags you put your veggies in so if you don't want to buy a whole box, reuse some produce bags) put them over his feet after he moisturizes, then socks over the bags. Have him wear them for at least an hour or sleep in them if he can.

I use/sell Beauticontrol and we have some great moisturizers, AND a great foot softening spray he could use, if you're interested send me a pm. Good luck!

It is not a fungus. I have the same thing. It is called keratosis pilaris. It is a skin disorder that makes the skin on the soles of the feet thicken and can lead to dry, cracked, very itchy skin. It can also lead to contact dermatitus(sp?) on the areas that itch. My dr. diagnosed me with it over a year ago and during the winter months it is torture. I am going to have to try a different treatment that what he has me on. Right now I am using a topical anti-itch cream and a prescription cream called triamcinolone acetonide cream to reduce the thickening of the skin but I cannot get it to completely go away and my dr said that if it did not go away by using these 2 together then I needed a steroid cream. I have noticed that when I wear shoes all the time that it makes it worse and if I wear my tennis shoes more than other types of shoes it gets worse. Anyway I would recommend going to the dr of your choice either a dermatologist or your family dr. Either one should be able to help. As for your daughter this skin disorder is treatable and can go away it can be inherited or can be triggered by enviroment so have her looked at as well. I hope this helps. Using the pumace stone in the shower is a great way to help the thickening skin, it gets off the thickest part and allows the skin to absorb the cream. Just be careful not to rub the feet raw. Any way I hope this helps. Oh and put the cream on at night and then socks over it to help your feet absorb the medicine. I know it sounds like a pain but it really does help.

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