15 answers

Suggestions to Wear Out High Energy 5 Year Old Boy

Help! My 5 yr. old boy's energy is about to drive me crazy! He's been this way since birth, sometime relaxing a bit, but lately it's insane. I try to get him running around often, but he's started to play more aggresively at home and at school. He's into pirates, so you can imaging what happens...I've had to limit any wrestling and pirate play. Any suggestions for games like red light/green light, or make believe which will wear him out would be greatly appreciated. He has a 2 yr. old brother that is his shadow. So I need to be careful that it is appropriate for both boys.

1 mom found this helpful

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Featured Answers

outdoors. theres something about fresh air and free running around that just wipes kids out. trust me, im a child care provider. its the fresh air that makes all the difference. :D

hope it works for you~!

More Answers

Both of my kids seem to be more full of energy these days as well. I think at my house we all have spring fever. I try to send mine outside everyday. Boys just naturally have a lot of energy and need to work it out. I notice that my son sleeps so much better after an afternoon outside if the temp allows.

My mother in law does daycare and takes the kids outside every day. When it is too muddy in the lawn she takes them for a walk around the block. She has them look for animals or listen for different sounds to make them more interested. When the weather doesn't cooperate she lets them run around in the garage. Sometimes she tells them just to run in a large circle. They love it! Another thing she does is to turn on the music and let them dance.

We used to have a tile floor and let the kids bring their scooters in for the winter. I also got some yoga cards for kids. They have different poses on each one. I thought my daughter would enjoy them, but it is my son who pulls them out by himself. He is also 5. He has me tell him what he needs to do to get into the certain pose. (it shows in different steps how to do it) It is quiet, but uses up a lot of his energy. I got them from Barefootbooks.com

1 mom found this helpful

K. - I totally understand. I have a high energy son, he was actually a very challenging child (still is to some point). He is now 16 and believe it or not that energy level serves him very well. School was a little difficult early on but he's adjusted and he plays hockey and baseball which keeps him active all year long.

My suggestion is to get him on a bike or inline skates now that it's spring. Enroll him for various sports programs, basketball and soccer are great energy uses as well as swimming. Hopefully you have a carrier for the 2 year old on your bike so you can all go biking together.

The other thing I would do is limit the amount of sugar and high glycemic carbs he eats (high glycemic carbs turn to sugar in your body). I never purchase pop for at home, we have very little cookies, candy, ice cream, etc in our home. Now that my son is 16, he eats that stuff at his friends but we limit what we have at home. There's always apples, bannanas, pears, etc on the counter for him to choose.

It does get easier and some day you will be thankful for all the gifts God has given him including "energy."

BTW - my son was never diagnosed with ad/hd and I'm very thankful no one ever suggested medicating him. I would try anything except medication.

Good luck

I have a four-year-old boy and a two-year-old girl and we love to play "Simon Says" to get in a little exercise. They think it's a lot of fun and they especially love getting caught doing something Simon didn't say to do. We run in place, march, do jumping jacks, arm circles and whatever else I can think up. This helps us all use up some energy, especially on days we are stuck in the house.

Hi K.-

I also have a five year old boy. Sometimes I take the kids to open gym at the YMCA and play basketball or just run around if it isn't crowded. Also, we love to go there during open swim. Swimming always wears my kids out, and it's nearly impossible to be too wild while trying to swim in deep water. Hope that helps.

My 5 year old boy is the same. TONS of energy. His favorite game (we "play" nearly daily and have for a couple years) is where he runs around the island in the kitchen until I say "freeze". Then he has to pretend he is an animal and I (or the 2 bigger brothers or younger sister) have to guess what he is. Sometimes he will just run and run and when I say freeze, he tells me he is not ready and keeps running. He is usually ready for something a little mellower after his "run". When the weather is nice, we do this outside and he picks something else to run around.

Another great thing we have is a toy from Creative Kidstuff called the "super skipper". It looks like to light sabers (can you tell I have boys?) attached at the handles that spin around for kids to continuously jump over. I think it was around $20-$30 and well worth every cent.

Good luck.

My daycare used to always say, Eli was outside for four hours today; he should be TIRED tonight... He never was, but he was a lot more manageable. We try to use friends so that we are not totally exhausted, also. It sounds like some of the things you're doing are already what I'd do--I've found that more "adult" activities--skiing, snowshoeing, things like that--that are harder for little kids because they lack the coordination and understanding of an adult--are good wear-out activities. Other kids was also a good one for us, again because it wasn't US that was always trying to keep up with our kid.

hey K.,
i have 3 of my 4 babies all have ad hd, so i know how hard and crazy it is too keep kids busy, and doing stuff thats good for them all. first off make a game of everything you do each day and try to get them to help you with all that you do as a mom even cooking, they can still help you mixing stuff up when they are as tiny as 2 years old. you should also try to have them start doing silly excerises, you should try to get them to see how many of certain things they can do in one day. i had to help them at first, and show them how to do them and enchorage them alot too. i know it may seem tough at first but it helps them exercise while mom can count for them and encourage them. have them run around a tree at home and see how long it takes them and try to help them count. take them to the parks all that you can it will help alot and try to play with them if u can, to enchorage them to keep playing longer and longer.
i have had some really long car rides with my kids and i stop as much as i can so they can burn off energy between parts of the ride. i have had them play at rest stops and even some times when i have to have them run around the car a few times to make sure that they have gotten out steam any way that i can.
take them to lessens if you have the money for it.
swimming lessons and anything else they may be able to handle will work.
i also take them to inside places to play and walk like the mall alot.

i hope this helps
T.

While alot of the suggestion are great - I have a few that might not have been mentioned in scannign other responses.
Liking wrestling- I would suggest replacement activity with heavy lifting/moving work - bags of rice/sand/popcorn in a wagon,gallons of waterfilled and dumped, moving furniture, pushing another person safely on a scooter board, climbing up and over and under cushions like obstacle course. Muscles If you really want some professional guidance, ask Ped for consult with local pediatric occupational therapist, who is familiar with sensory processing.

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