22 answers

Son Having Trouble Remembering Letter Sounds

Hi, my son is having trouble learning to read. He knows all the letter names. I can show him a B and he'll say "bee", but I have a hard time getting him to say the sound that B makes: "buh"

Is this something I should be concerned about? Are there any ways I can help him with this? Thanks in advance.

1 mom found this helpful

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

Have you ever heard of ZooPhonics? They are really fun to learn, and each letter has a corresponding character (A-Allie Alligator, B-Bubba Bear..) sound, and arm movement. It makes it a little bit more fun to learn, and I have seen 2 year olds master it with this program. Plus, it has a song and a dance, what kid doesn't like that?

2 moms found this helpful

I was a kindergarten teacher for three years and for my students having trouble remembering their letter sounds I would put them on www.starfall.com and choose the ABC's on the left side and have them go through the ones they are having trouble with. Hope this helps. Good luck

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

Have you ever heard of ZooPhonics? They are really fun to learn, and each letter has a corresponding character (A-Allie Alligator, B-Bubba Bear..) sound, and arm movement. It makes it a little bit more fun to learn, and I have seen 2 year olds master it with this program. Plus, it has a song and a dance, what kid doesn't like that?

2 moms found this helpful

I was a kindergarten teacher for three years and for my students having trouble remembering their letter sounds I would put them on www.starfall.com and choose the ABC's on the left side and have them go through the ones they are having trouble with. Hope this helps. Good luck

1 mom found this helpful

My daughter who is 4 1/2 watches The Letter Factory by Leap Frog DVD....it is awesome and she knows all of her sounds...this dvd was referred by all of the kindergarten teachers at my oldest school to help them wiht letters at home..it works..and the kids like the video...

1 mom found this helpful

Hi A.,

We used "The Letter Factory" by LeapFrog. My son learned his sounds in less than a month at 3. And then to keep him sharp, we sounded out small words. I made it a game he played with his older sister. Now that he is in kindergarten, he is reading way above average.

D.

My kids had an easy time learning to read because they didn't say the alphabet letters--like "W" as that can be confusing at times. Instead, they said the sounds that the letters make. I think that there is a song for this.
I used to teach reading and kids learn best when you, as a parent do a few things to help. Read to him every day, and as you read, let him use his pointing finger to follow along as you read.
As well, when he inevitably chooses the same story, when you read it, omit saying the last word or phrase, and allow him to say it.
Another trick I did was to put a "word" into my kids lunch box. Our refrigerator had magnet sight words on it and when I was cooking dinner, that was something we looked at and they memorized them. Good luck and keep it fun!

Have your son start watching Super Why on PBS. It is a very good show and it teaches kids how to spell as well as learning the alphabet sounds.

Hi A.,

You didn't say how old he is?

He might need help with phonemic awareness. Or he might just be young still and needs more time. The method you use can also affect results.

My sister is a dyslexia specialist and uses a program called LIPS to help kids who have problems pronouncing the correct sounds of letters. She helps the children learn how to form their lips, teeth and tounge for the appropriate sound.

My youngest had a lot of difficulty saying sounds. (I think her 1/2 inch overbite didn't help). Eventually we prevaled. My sister could have helped but lived a half hour away in Fremont. So we worked on it at home using SWR cards. She is 7 and does fine now. We homeschool, and use a program called Spell to Write and Read ,(SWR),by Wanda Sanseri.I compared it to her reading program and it uses many similar techniques and reading rules. It has flashcards. We hold up the card and say only the phonogram sound, (not the name of the letter.) Also there is no picture on the cards. Both of these differences help with lessening confusion. Only a white card with a black letter typeface on it. For example, I hold up a letter A, and I say "a - A - ah " (the short sound, then the long sound, and finally the ah sound). I say them in exact same order everytime. They are said from most common sound to least common sound. After she learns the sounds of the letters on the cards, we then learn the name of the letter as she learns to form the letter on paper , and subsequently spell it in words and write the spelling words in a journal. From all of this, she learns to read! It's an amazing program, and no struggling or tears like the other reading program I used with my firstborn. However, you will need to tutor yourself by reading the coresponding manual, or go to training classes to learn how to use it. If you know someone who homeschools and uses it they can be a Godsend, because I think just using the cards alone, without all the other stuff, if used correctly, can help kids get past many reading hurdles.

Whatever you decide to use, be patient and know that he will get it eventually. If he is 7, 8, or 9, in the public school system and still struggling with correct letter sounds, try a dyslexia or other special ed tutor who uses the lips program (barton program)or other equivalent program.

If he is just young and not remembering, some kids do need more time than others. My youngest, (with the overbite) took twice as long as my other two to memorize letter sounds. It was like pounding it into a wall! It seemed like she had to be at a brain maturity level before it could sink in. Once her brain was "ready", then she indeed learned it. Sometimes vitamins can help with memory. Thiamine , glutamine , lemon balm, Cod liver oil, are all documented to help memory.

Blessings,
G.

Greetings A., You do not say how old your child is, I really hope that he is over 4 when teaching him to read.
I am a Child Advocate, and am having several parents that seem to think it is the current and Yuppie thing to teach the child to read at age 2.
As the mother of 5 and now the grandmother of several children, I have learned that diffrent things can cause a child to not be able to make the sounds you desire.
Having worked with a Speach Therepist for severl years( with 2 of my sons) may I share this, just to consider.
My sons both had an excessive amount of ear infections. One child, actually had his ear tubes not completely formed. The point being, that they DID NOT hear and learn the normal sounds at the age that is generaly accepted of a child. It was at 5 for one child, after several operations, and at 8 for the other child for the same reasons. They had to learn later because of the way that they HEARD the sounds was muffled and as if under water. They are just fine now and have been very succesful in everyway. I have to say that at one son's hearing appointment-- the doctor was trying to "prepare us" that he would most likely never speak. Then all of a sudden the child looked up at a picture of the Doctor on a motorcycle & said" Ka- wa- sake" he sounded out each part but he got it out. It taught the doctor a mighty lesson. Take Care, Nana Glenda

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