9 answers

Six Year Old Scared to Ride Bike

I am looking for ways to help encourage my six year old to feel comfortable riding her bike. She is very scared she will fall off. She has gone for rides in the past and been very happy but goes through stages where she cries and is very scared.

1 mom found this helpful

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

O.- Is there a reason that she is supposed to ride her bike? If not, then I would say to stop forcing the issue.
She will ride her bike when she is ready! THe little girl I nanny is 2 but her sister is 9. She was also afraid to ride her bike, she didn't start riding consistently by herself until last summer, and she was so proud of herself! I would just go with her feelings....when she wants to ride, ride, when not...don't!
L.

2 moms found this helpful

More Answers

If you are a SAHM, is there a Daddy?

Girls often don't 'believe' mommas telling them something physical is going to be safe, but are more likely to believe their dad or another man who cares deeply for them. Presuming said dad doesn't push them 'past' their fear like he would push a boy.

Girls need to have their fear accepted to move through it, from the inside, and teaching a girl 'there's nothing to fear' through physical experience (from the outside) probably won't work like it would for a boy. As far as I can tell (from growing up and now having kids), a boy jumps off something high once and doesn't die, it's all fun from there ... a girl jumps off something high and doesn't die, it's still scary anyhow, for a long time/many more jumps.

Riding a bike freaked me the heck out, for months, when I learned at 6. Currently it's freaking my 4 year old daughter out--but my 6 year old son finds it frustrating, not freaky.

Driving a car about 15 mph for the first time freaked me out, too, when I was 15 ;).

3 moms found this helpful

O.- Is there a reason that she is supposed to ride her bike? If not, then I would say to stop forcing the issue.
She will ride her bike when she is ready! THe little girl I nanny is 2 but her sister is 9. She was also afraid to ride her bike, she didn't start riding consistently by herself until last summer, and she was so proud of herself! I would just go with her feelings....when she wants to ride, ride, when not...don't!
L.

2 moms found this helpful

I assume you mean "without training wheels." And you say she has done some in the past, but sometimes the fear reasserts itself.

My own girl isn't that age yet, but she responds well to practical honesty, which for this situation (with mine) would be:

1) yes, all bike riders fall sometimes, and it's no fun.
2) the more practice you get, the less you'll fall.
3) let's practice where it won't hurt as much (on grass though it's harder work) and protect you (with gear) in case you do.
4) that's as much as can be done if you want to be a bike-riding person in this life. (Or any other fun activity--all you can do is minimize the risks through training and protective gear, or stay home.)
5) but if you want to wait until you're bigger or feel better about it, that's fine too.

1 mom found this helpful

O.,
My 6 year old daughter just figured it out this weekend--on Mother's Day! She was frustrated, scared, and embarrased because all of the other kids on our street (aged 5-8) could ride on 2 wheels but she could not and for the last two years has had no interest in trying. Finally a few weeks ago, she and her dad went to the community college where there are lots of flat paths, open fields and no other kids. After 2 sessions, she's riding on her own!
I think what helped a lot was practicing on grass. That way, when she fell, there was no "road burn." Also, she has asked to have knee pads and elbow pads so that she's not skinned up when she does fall. Maybe that would help your daughter.

1 mom found this helpful

Both my son and I were late bike riders--like 8 years old. By the age of 10 nobody could tell that we were late learners. My mother was really the best role model for me. She let me learn at my pace. And I did that with my son. No pressure. Worked great for both of us.

1 mom found this helpful

Our son went through a phase at five of being hesitant to ride his bike. He spent the next few months riding his scooter a lot, which I believe allowed him to improve his balancing skills in a safer-feeling way. One day out of the blue he said, "I want to ride my bike!", and hopped on and took off! All the scooter riding really seemed to help his balance and his confidence.

1 mom found this helpful

My daughter is the type that, whether it's potty training, swimming, biking or reading: SHE has to decide she wants to and she's ready. Once she decides, it happens pretty easily, but if I I try to make her, because I think it's time, it's a hundred times harder, and what's the point? There's no rule that says a six year old HAS to ride a bike or HAS to enjoy riding her bike. It's just an option, isn't it?

So, I would say, be really casual about it. OFFER her opportunities to go practice on a really safe, quiet area, like a high school track. But dont make her. Offer her an incentive, maybe, like a treat, but only in such a way that it really is fine if she says no.

My daughter is almost 6 and she just learned without training wheels this spring. We tried last summer but she wasn't really into it.

1 mom found this helpful

My daughter went through the same thing. What helped her was going riding/learning with one of her friends who was a the same skill level as her. I think the friendly competition and learning from each others mistakes they both learned how to ride that day. What also encouraged my daughter was watching other kids in her same age group ride around the park confidently. Good luck. Have you tried riding with her in a trail-a-bike, that is also a great learning tool, so she can learn about hand signals and road rules as well as practice balance in a safe setting, with out training wheels. My daughter thought the training wheels were scary and they seemed to be hindering her rather than helping. After we took the wheels off she became a little more confident. Good Luck

1 / 3
Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.