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My son is two yrs old. & always sick. Hes been sick for about 5 weeks off & on again. He maybe got 5 good days out of 5 wks. Not kidding. First wk was the flu. then allergies, them chest pain, & now he has croupe. I take him to the doctors, they say its normal. My daughter never got this sick. I feel so helpless. I wish I know what to do to make him feel better. Please any ideas?

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

My girls (11 & 8) have not been sick in over 2 years thanks to Isagenix and proper nutrition. Are you supplementing with high quality vitamins and minerals? It is EXTREMELY important. It is well known that to get the proper nutrtion now a days we muct supplement. Isagenix has an amazing kids program. Let me know if you want more info about it.

Barbile
www.HeyYouGetReal.com

hi i kind of had the same problems with my daughter when she was around the same age. She had RSV and then when she was over that she would get sick all the time with a cough or a runny nose. The best thing that seemed to work for me is to steam up the bathroon and sit in their with her for about 5-10 min. This helps to clear the air passages. She is five years old now and very healthy. Good luck

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It is normal for toddlers and young children to get 6-12 colds or viral illnesses per year. Most are in the Fall and Winter and it may seem like they are sick nonstop because each illness can last a few weeks. This will happen even more for kids in daycare and those with older siblings who bring home more viruses and germs. You cannot prevent all illnesses, but please beware of some advice given here. Vaccines ARE helpful and through vaccines we have virtually eliminated polio, smallpox, measles, and now chicken pox is exceptionally rare. All of these diseases have the potential to cause permanent harm or death. In unvaccinated children, especially those who tend to gather together and live in the same area due to their parents' philosophies, there have been outbreaks of measles and other illnesses most of us will never see. Other theories on the rise in allergies are antibacterial soap, prevention of exposure by over protective parents, food additives, poor air quality, etc. There is no proof of allergies increasing due to vaccines. I am a physician, parent of a toddler, and I vaccinate my daughter. She has had 2 colds in 14mo even with exposures at her small daycare and playgroup. She got over both with no real problems at all.
My recommendation to you is to be patient, keep your son away from sick children as much as possible, make sure you wash his hands often and if he has a virus, realize it will pass and the only treatment needed is tender love and care, fluids, and rest.

1 mom found this helpful

My youngest son has severe autism. Since we adopted him from a Romanian orphanage, we knew that he would have some medical issues. Even so, what I heard over and over was, "just give him time" or "he'll outgrow this."

I decided not to listen to the doctors and set about educating myself on post-institutionalized children. I made copies of the articles and went back to the doctors, special education people and other therapists. After consultations and more consultations, we concluded that we were both right: some kids just catch up and some kids need extra help. I insisted on the extra help until I got it.

My son has home with our family for almost 7 years. He's made huge huge progress but is still woefully behind. At almost 10 years old, he has the speech of a 27-month old, the reading level of a preschooler and the patience of a gnat. I shudder to think where we would be if I had waited for him to outgrow this.

I tell you this story because, sometimes, many times, most of the time, moms do know best. If you sense that something is wrong with your son, something probably is. So now is the time to step up and work on this issue yourself.

Get on the internet. Type in his symptoms and see what comes up. Figure out if there is something that you can do at home, yourself (maybe he's allergic to something?). Adjust his diet, get him outside more, keep him away from people, whatever. . . Just start doing something.

Try one intervention at a time. For example, if you think he's allergic to milk or that maybe the kids in daycare are infecting him, eliminate one or the other. Watch what happens. Then try eliminating the other. Watch what happens.

Keep notes -- a diary. What he eats, what you eat (if nursing), where you go, who you see, how he acts, what he physically looks like . . . write it all down, multiple times a day (I did my son's every 30 minutes or so -- quick status like: ate yogurt, home, brothers/me, agressive, eyes vacant) If you discover a pattern, act on it.

Take your research and your behavior diary back to the doctor. Show it to him, with your research and your conclusions. Ask for his help. If he dismisses you again, ask this question: "I know that you are a wise person who has treated many, many children. I know that you have seen many, many kids outgrow something like this. But I haven't -- I have only my kid and he is sick. Tell me what behaviors or symptoms tell you that this is just a phase. Help me to understand how this is normal."

As the doctor explains himself, write it down, take notes. Pay attention. Make him give you concrete examples such as no fever, still playing with toys, smiles at me . . . whatever.

When he is done, ask this question. "What kind of behaviors or symptoms would concern you? What would indicate problems to you?" Again, write it down, take notes, pay attention. Get concrete examples: high fever, tugging at ears, loose stools, etc.

Then take a few moments to compare your behavioral diary to the notes that you've just taken. Point out discrepancies ("you said that no fever is good but look, he's run a fever three out of the last four days. What does that mean to you?")

Many doctors make quick diagnosis based mostly on experience and the theory that "if you hear hoofbeats behind you, it's probably a horse, not a zebra." Most kids have common illnesses because, well, they are common.

But every now and then, every once and a while, it's a zebra. And when it's a zebra, you two are going to have to work together to figure out what is wrong and what can be done about it. You job is to make sure that he sees all the things you see, that he considers his diagnosis carefully and that your son gets the best possible care.

In the long run, either the doctor is right and what's going on with your son is normal, you are right and there's a bigger problem here or there is some combination.. If the doctor is correct, you have the right to feel comfortable with and confident in that diagnosis. He should help you get to that place.

If you are right, the doctor should put the best interests of the child first and respond to your factual presentation of the data. He should then take more action.

If it's a combination, you guys will need to work together to find the middle ground.

Going to see someone armed with research and cold data will get you a lot further than riding high on emotion. "Experts" can dispute emotion or intuition but they have a hard time discarding concrete facts. This is your son. Take control.

I know how frustrating that is, I went through it too. My daughter is three now and I'm dreading flu and cold season, just around the corner. I'm hoping she will stay relatively healthy this winter. My daughter was literally more sick than well from about November to April the last 2 years. The doctors just keep telling me that my daughter is normal and some kids just get sicker than others. Especially ones that go to a preschool or daycare. It's hard to take that as an answer, but I have no choice. I actually had to quit my job a couple of years ago because I was paying for daycare that she couldn't use and was missing so much work.

Depending on what kind of sicknesses he has, you should have them check his tonsils, but it sounds like your son had the same random illnesses that my daughter had, and they told me removing her tonsils would not help one bit.

I don't have any brilliant answers for you except to say, it will get better. Hang in there and try to prevent illness as best as possible. Keep a clean home, disinfect, give vitamins and Airborne when other people are sick, really what more can you do?

Good luck.

If you are currently giving him vaccinations, stop.
There are a lot of ingredients in vaccines that can cause illness and allergic reactions. These illnesses may be reactions to the shots, or what's in them. Most of the vaccines are worse than the diseases they supposedly prevent. If you want some reputable information, try:
http://www.lewrockwell.com/miller/miller15.html
http://www.informedchoice.info/index.php
http://www.vaccinesafety.edu/package_inserts.htm

We don't vaccinate our son. Many people who don't vaccinate believe or experience that their children are not as sick as often as vaccinated children. Our son has had a few colds (4-5 at 21 months), but no serious problems. While autism gets all the press, vaccines may be responsible for rises in allergies, asthma, ear infections, and other auto-immune illnesses. As the number of vaccines has risen, so have the numbers of several illnesses and conditions. Cause and effect has not been proven, as there has not been a comprehensive study of vaccinated children versus unvaccinated children. It's certainly worth looking into.
It's a proven fact that the flu shot causes the flu in some people, by the way.

Hi S.,
The poor little guy. Keep in mind that everyone's body has the ability to fight desease given the proper environment. Make sure he's getting his daily vitamins and proper nutrition. I assume your son is in some sort of daycare. Is it clean? Are there other children whom are sick as well? Most likely you cannot avoid the common cold; however, 5 weeks is a long time. I'd examine a little further. Hope he feels better soon.

Good luck,
E.

S., my best advice is to ask your doctor to send you to a specialist. Possibly a "Rheumatologist" as they do specialize in some "immune disorders" (and nope, not talking about HIV). They are lots, and lots of types of immune system disorders that can make people constantly sick. Or ask if there is another specialist your child can see that specializes in immune system problems. Only 5 good days out of 5 weeks to me is a sign something serious is going on. Doesn't seem normal and you are very right to be concerned. I hope you find some answers and your lil' one gets better.

They will be sick for a solid year. I'm not kidding. One thing after another. It is good that he is "getting it out of the way" before he gets to school, where germs are EVERYWHERE. Your older daughter is bringing home all sorts of germs and he is catching them. He will come out of this stronger. I'm not kidding. Just stay in contact with your ped. to make sure that nothing else is happening. Both of my girls went through this. My younger one was sick in her first year of life because of daycare, and then when we moved to a new climate (Hawaii) she did it all over again, because apparently there are "new germs" that thrive here in the hot/wet petrie dish. My little one caught everything that was available to catch when the big one went to school. Now I think they are both done. Sometimes My older one (in school) will come home with a mild cold (just runny nose, not even complaining) and I will get a full-blown cold from her little runny nose, because she gets exposed to all of those sticky kid germs daily and I do not!

Take heart, just keep taking him to the doctor and keep the humidifier going - don't forget Vics Vaporub!

Some kids just have bad immune systems. I was always sick as a little one, but my daughter is healthy as a horse. You may try to promote his immunity (especialy during flu season) with some natural methods. Highlands (the teething tablet people) make a Vitamin C tablet that my girl just loves. I've also been told that a little Flaxseed Oil in their milk everyday can strengthen immunity too. Hope this helps

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