13 answers

Seeking Advice: I Want a 3Rd Child but My Husband Does Not

I am almost 35, my husband is 37. We have two happy and healthy boys ages 9 and 7. He is concerned about the finacial issue of a third child and has said that we should wait to decide. I am afraid that I am getting to old to fast. My heart is broken every time we talk about it. He is a wonderful man who would give me the world and I respect his concerns but I am finding it very hard to put this issue to rest. I do not feel that my family is complete. I keep trying to put my self in his shoes and see his side, but I honestly feel that if he came to me with this request, I would say lets try. Does anyone have any advice as to how to deal with this, I am really struggling to put a smile on my face. I feel as though this is taking over my life. I love him with all my heart and never want our relationship to faulter because of this.

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What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

Thank you to everyone that has taken time to send me there thoughts. My husband and I went away for the weekend and talked ALOT. I am very happy to have my two boys and a loving husband. We are just going to let things stay the way they are and enjoy the summer. We will talk about everything again in the fall. Your advice helped quite a bit. Thank you all again.

Featured Answers

Hi A.,
I posted the same thing not too long ago. I don't think men ever really get those feelings when it comes to having children so he probably doesn't truly understand. I don't have any advice but please no I feel for you I'm in the same boat.

More Answers

I hate to sound harsh, but shouldn't you be happy for what you already have?

I'm 40.. time is up. I have one. That's it. And you know what? I am so grateful that I do have who I have! She is wonderful and loving. Sure, we'd love to have a second, but in this economy, we made the decision to focus on the child we do have (btw, I was 'infertile' when I conceived). It is difficult, though, when I see babies, but worse when I see people whining when they have something many others would love to have a fraction of.

Also.. you do have time for this economy to turn around.
Sorry, sister, but I have to side with your husband. So, I'd lay off... cry to your girlfriends if you must, but give the poor guy a break. He already gave you two angels.

1 mom found this helpful

Hi A.,
My advice is to not let this desire consume you. Focus on your blessings and not what you feel you’re missing. I heard you say that you have a husband who loves you and two happy, healthy children. While women tend to define themselves emotionally, men typically define themselves by their ability to provide for their families, period. I would encourage you to really hear what your husband is saying when he expresses concern over the financial responsibility of a third child. It sounds as if he’s not sure that he’ll be able to support your current lifestyle if you have another child right now. You don’t mention whether or not you work outside the home, so I’m not sure how this factors into the equation. If you do, how does the third child impact your time away from home and the family in order to make things work financially? If you don’t, how does this impact your husband’s time away from home and the quality of family life? It’s very easy for husbands and wives to lose one another during those early years with a new baby. Perhaps your husband feels that he’s just getting you back (now that your children are a little older) and is also concerned about the impact the needs of a new baby will have on your marriage. Motherhood is a wonderful thing and a blessing for all who are able to experience it; be careful not to make so many sacrifices in your marriage in pursuit of a third child that it becomes too difficult to recover. The children are designed to grow up, leave us, and live their own lives; the husband will be there until the end. Then the question becomes what quality of life/marriage do you want to have when it’s just you and your husband? You say that your family feels incomplete and I’m not sure that I understand. Did you have a predetermined number of children that you wanted to have when you got married? Are you hoping for a girl to balance out the testosterone in the house? (smile) Did you come from a large family? At the end of the day, God gives us exactly what we need. If it’s two, three, or six children, motherhood is a blessing and God’s most precious gift to women. I sincerely believe that if you change your perspective and focus on what you have rather than what’s missing, everything else will fall into place. God supplies our needs and gives us a whole lot of what we want. Be patient and wait on Him. You’ve got time; I had my last at 37 and would likely be pregnant again (or have had another by now) if we hadn’t decided after the last that we are done. It’s time for me and my husband to invest more time in our marriage now that we’ve graduated from nursing, diapers, and potty training. Focusing on your marriage doesn’t make you a bad mom; in fact, I’d say it makes you a better mom. Enjoy your blessings and remember to take deep breaths.

1 mom found this helpful

I'm sorry you're having to deal with this :-(

Have you thought about maybe adopting through the foster system? There are a LOT of babies and toddlers in the foster system who desperately want families. And kids who are adopted through the system are provided with services their whole childhood, including health care, food and educational help. That might alleviate some of your husband's financial concerns.....

Hi A.:
If I was you, I'd try to convince my husband that money isn't the end all and be all of security and happiness. When you look back in 20 years, will you both be happy with your decision not to have a third child? This is the point I'd try to impress upon him.

Recently, my husband felt the same way about us having a second child. I will be 31 this July and told him I didn't want to put it off any longer. He finally came around. Now that I'm 3 months pregnant, he's thrilled about our decision.

I would sit and talk to him about the way you feel...good luck!

I have four little ones and we were not going to have a fourth because money is already tighter than you can imagine! I had three boys and I wanted to give it a shot to try for that girl! We went for it and we got our girl. Some people would think we are crazy because realistically, we can't afford what we have, but when it comes down to it...my days of being selfish are long gone! My kids are far from deprived. They are actually pretty spoiled in a lot of ways. Do I have any Coach bags? No. Do I have a nice wardrobe? No. Does my husband go away with the guys or go golfing when he wants? No. My husband and I come last in EVERY way and we are completely fine with that. I had my teens and early twenties to spend my paycheck on me and only me. Those days are over and I would not trade my little ones for any of it. Our budget is beyond tight and we certainly can't afford our kids to have "everything", but even if we could, that is not how I would bring them up. Are we going to have a car waiting for each of our children when they turn 16? Absolutely not. They will have to earn their way and there is NOTHING wrong with that. I came from a family of four kids and my husband came from a family of three kids. Our biggest memories of growing up are the "little" things.
Good luck with your convicing! I can almost guarantee that if you talk him into it he will never regret it!

Hi A.,
I posted the same thing not too long ago. I don't think men ever really get those feelings when it comes to having children so he probably doesn't truly understand. I don't have any advice but please no I feel for you I'm in the same boat.

Have you sorted out why this is such a burning desire of yours? Are you consciously or unconsciously testing your husband with a subtle "Do you still love me enough to make another baby?" That may not be the issue at all. But it's worth asking yourself why you want another baby so badly. What does a third child give you that two children do not? What feels incomplete? Is it that you always wanted a girl? Or is it something else? How many siblings do you and your husband have? What were your experiences that shape both your feelings today? Exploring these questions may help you and your husband walk through this decision better together.

We had our one and only child when I was 36, almost 37. My mom's parents were in their late 40s, in the 1920s, when she and her sister were born. So, although age is a factor, it doesn't need to dictate. Risks do rise as you get older but there are also plenty of children born to older parents these days that are wonderfully healthy. You just need to discern if you both are willing to take the risk and how you will react if things don't go well health-wise.

A few things to consider regarding age:
1) You may be wiser as an older parent but you may also have less energy.
2) Our 12-year-old complains about us being "so old" at 49 and 55 when he wants to go out and run around and we've got some ache or pain or are just plain tired. Plus, he has no cousins his own age (his main complaint)--they range from college age to 40.
3) How old will you both be when your youngest graduates from high school and college? How does that feel?
4) Are you both ready to start all over again with the diapers and no sleep at night?
5) If you end up having a c-section, your body won't bounce back as quickly as the first and second times. (For that matter, that's probably true of a vaginal birth as well. : )

We always wanted two children but that wasn't in the cards. That saddens us but we feel whole as a family at this point. We make it feel whole by having lots of kids at our house frequently. We also both do a lot of volunteer work in the community.

We once asked our neighbors across the street, who have five children, at what number did it start getting harder? They chuckled and said when they outnumbered the parents. With two kids they could divide and conquer. But with 3, 4, and 5 kids, they had to be more creative with their energies and coordination. Plus, car space began to dictate how big or how many cars were used when going some place.

I was the last of six kids. There were five kids in six years, then...surprise...me five years later. So I grew up in a large family but was also an only child, of sorts, for six years (my older sister was a year ahead in school). That had its plusses and minuses, but that's something to consider as well.

Deciding to have another is a two-way street. It takes two to tango and two to enjoy and struggle with the outcome. Ask questions that explore your hopes and fears, the challenges of remaining a family of four or of growing to more. Allow some time for both of you to think about this independently and together. This is a great opportunity to truly discern what works best for all of you--you and your family.

Good luck!

This is about more than a child - it's about you having an unresolved issue and a broken heart. I think some short-term counseling, either together or for just you, will help you to voice your feelings better and hopefully draw him into a dialogue. This is something that will always be between you if it is not resolved. If you are struggling to put a smile on your father and you feel your heart is broken, you are headed toward depression and a real obstacle in your marriage. Get some professional help so that, whatever you decide, it's a good decision. My husband and I went through this, both about getting married and then about having more than one child - and counseling helped enormously to clarify our priorities. Now we are totally together. I wish you all the best.

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