25 answers

Sedation for a Dental Exam for a Toddler

Hello all,

I have a daughter who is soon to be 3. She is very sensitive- and afraid of noises such as the vacuum, blender and anything else that makes a buzzing noise.

Her teeth are badly in need of a cleaning - we do brush them but they really need a professinal cleaning. I know that she will not sit nicely while they clean her teeth - that thing makes a buzzing noise and it will scare the daylights out of her.

I did call the pediatric dentist nearby and they said they use valium to sedate children so they will cooperate during dental procedures.

My husband does not want her drugged and I really dont either but I know my kid and she will be scared and screaming and the dentist will not be able to work on her.

Has anyone had to sedate their child for a routine dental cleaning>

Did they use valium for your child and how did it effect the child.?

1 mom found this helpful

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

Hi L.!
I didn't have to sedate my son for his cleaning, but we did have to for a cavity. We have to again this month for another cavity! Who are his parents! :)
My son is 5 and he won't even consider the laughing gas because he doesn't want to float.
To be perfectly honest with you, I don't know what mild sedation was called and I can't find the dental record to see if it said,s o I could let you know. He was groggy for a little while after his filling, but was fine. He is also fine with doing it again since he doesn't want the gas around his nose.
Hope this helps!!
Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

My sister found a dentist in Saginaw that specialize in kids. Very kid friendly staff and rooms and only sedate if really ness. I don't know the name but I know they take medicaid pts so it might be easy to look up.

a good dentist would not sedate - seriously. I have an absolutely paronoid child (#3) and have been to good and bad dentists. We have found one three that worked for us. When she wouldnt cooperate we just made another appointment and came back. Only had to do it one time. Some dentists dont let the mommies back, for my child it was easier if I was there.

More Answers

Hi L.!
I didn't have to sedate my son for his cleaning, but we did have to for a cavity. We have to again this month for another cavity! Who are his parents! :)
My son is 5 and he won't even consider the laughing gas because he doesn't want to float.
To be perfectly honest with you, I don't know what mild sedation was called and I can't find the dental record to see if it said,s o I could let you know. He was groggy for a little while after his filling, but was fine. He is also fine with doing it again since he doesn't want the gas around his nose.
Hope this helps!!
Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

American Association of Pediatrics is suggesting that if your insurance will cover it or you can afford it your child should start going into the dentists when they start getting a good number of teeth. They will check to make sure they are coming in properly and also do some "buzzing" and gentle polishing in small amounts so the child does get used to the office and what goes on. My 3 year old had cavities in both back molars (they say from too much milk or his reflux they weren't sure which). They took him in and got him situated in the chair with a cartoon. He was very calm since this was like his 5th visit to the office. They let him pick a "smell" orange or grape and then they gave him a "funny nose" to wear which is what put out the sedative. He is calm usually anyway but they did all the drilling and he never flinched. My problem lies with the dentists that want to "Swaddle" the child when they don't even give them a shot to do it without. If you think she would be calmer without you in the room, then try that. The reason for the early visits though is because there isn't a long visit or procedure and they get used to it gradually. My youngest son is 1 and he is set to go in for his first visit in December. Good habits can never be formed too early, and unfortunately even with dilligence on a healthy diet children do need to see the dentist in case of cavities as well. Who would have ever thought a child could drink too much milk and get cavities?
Good Luck, and be sure to find a dentist that works well with your child. My dentist is not a pediatric dentist, he is the family dentist-and he is awesome to my kids and they trust him.

1 mom found this helpful

My son had a cavity at age 2 or something like that. The pediactric dentist couldn't do anything because he was too afraid. I had to reschedule and they wrote a prescription for some sort of sedative (don't remember what it is). It worked...the dentist was able to do what he needed to do. A couple years later my boss referred me to a dentist and both my son and I have been going to them for years. As soon as my son set foot into this office, he was fine...he loves these people. You have to do what you have to do. It's not like your 3 year old is going to all of a sudden be hooked on valium because you gave it to him for this much needed trip to the dentist. Your son will be fine. Oh you ask how it affected my child. He stood up from the couch when it was time to leave for the appointment and almost fell over. Sorry, but my mom and I were cracking up. It was pretty funny...but he didn't get sick or anything.

I don't know what to do for her immediatly, but my daughter just turned three, and for about a year now we brush her teeth with a cute little kids electric tooth brush. When she had her first dentist appt she did need a little bribery to open her mouth for a stranger, but because she was use to the noise it didn't bother her. I also have her sit on my lap everytime I get a cleaning.
I reccomend getting a little electric toothbrush, then at least your kid will be use to the buzzing next time.
again, I don't know about the drugs on the kids....

L.,

I have 5 boys and always went into the room with them the first couple of times they got their teeth cleaned. I think it made my kids feel more secure to know I was close by. Everytime at the dentist I always ask, "Do you want me to come with you or wait here?" For quite awhile they would always ask for me to go, but eventually they always end up saying that I can just wait in the outer waiting room. I think it helps them to feel in control if they have a choice.

When my 4th son was around 22 months old he was a climber and climbed up on a short metal filing cabinet that we have and before I could run across the room to grab him, he slipped and caught his tooth on the edge of it. He chipped it off and it had a pretty sharp edge on it. So I called the dentist and they filed it down for me, but he did not like the experience at all, and what they did to get it done was I sat in the dentist chair and then put my son on my lap. I was able to comfort him and hold him securely while they did what they had to do. I would think this may be preferable to valium?

Just wanted to let you know something we did that worked well.
Good luck.

My daughter is the same way and had a horrible experience at our regular dentist's office. She was terrified after that even more than she was before. They referred us to a pediatric dentist in Brighton - Dr. Hale. We took her to see him and the office is awesome. They only see kids and they all sit next to each other for their cleanings. The rooms are designed as Nemo, and spaceships - they watch cartoons during their cleanings and wear sunglasses. My daughter walked out of their smiling and happy as could be. I suggest trying to find an office like this before you go with the sedation. Or if you can't maybe have them try giving her the nitroce gas and see if that would calm her down enough to do the cleaning.

Valium is very effective and very safe (even for children) for dental work...it's very common. Of course you don't want your child drugged, who would? But proper dental care is not an option...so you have 2 choices...either sedate her or fight her...you choose. Don't let anyone scare you out of doing what is best for YOUR child...some moms are only interested in argument factor...you know the ones who ask for the doc's advice seemingly only to argue about it! LOL

I find no harm in medicating when necessary. She won't have any ill effects from the valium except a long nap when she gets home. It really is the most stress free way to go. Eventually, I'll bet she will grow to accept seeing the dentist without needing sedation. You aren't setting her up for any bad reactions in the future. However, there are MANY adults who come through our office asking for pre-dental sedation meds. It's really not a big deal!

~L.

Dear L.,

Our granddaughters' dentist sedated her with some drug (I don't know which one because my husband is the one who takes her to most appointments and he simply does not think to ask all the questions I would if I were taking her). It made her feel relaxed and not scared so she had a positive experience and was not afraid to go the next time she had an appointment. I think this is a good thing. It is being administered by professionals so it is usually safe. I would not do it if you have to sign a waiver stating that you would not sue if any bad thing happened as a result of using the particular drug your dentist's office prefers to use. Otherwise, I would go for it. Using a drug two times a year and getting teeth cleaned properly could prevent some gum problems in the future and possibly keep your child going so her teeth "stay" healthy as she grows up. Some kids have super sensitive hearing and loud sounds scare them. My granddaughter eventually outgrew the need for sedation and now she is not scared to go to the dentist regularly. That reminds me to remind my husband to make them another appointment.

L. C.

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