25 answers

Screaming 1 Year Old

I have a 1 year old boy that screams all the time! It is not like a crying scream it's just a very loud scream. I have no idea what to do about it. I have asked the doctor if this is normal. He claims it is. He suggest I try to ignore it. I have done that with no luck. I also have a 4 year old boy that never did anything like this. I am getting to the point where I don't want to go in public with him becuase he just screams the whole time. It has gotten so bad when he does this I am going through the diaper bag giving him anything and everything just so he will be quiet. I am trying so hard to describe this and I don't think I'm doing a good job of how bad it really it. The scream is a very loud about 10 seconds long scream. He will do it over and over again. He started to do this a few months ago. I would love to hear any advice from anyone who has any idea what I am talking about. Thank you so much if you can help!

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

my 18 month old daughter does this and it drives me insane, esp when i'm driving. i tried to ignore her and it worked for about, oh, 35 nanoseconds. it finally got so bad i had to tap her on the leg and say "NO!" very firmly and that nipped it in the bud pretty quickly. DON'T cater to the screaming with toys; it reinforces the behavior. good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

Completly normal. More than likely he has discovered that he has a voice and is learning how to use it. Have you tried just putting him in his crib when he starts and walking away. If no one is paying attention to him, more that likely he will stop. Dont give him things to "shut him up" that will hinder his speech from developing if he know that all he has to do is scream and someone will come a runnin'.

I would put a playpen in the corner and when he starts it consistently put him there for a time out. He will soon connect the scream with the playpen and realize that it is not as much fun as being free to play. Also, do not reward the screaming with everything out of the diaper bag. He has found his voice and it gets a cool reaction so it is fun and he will continue until it is not fun for him.

More Answers

my 18 month old daughter does this and it drives me insane, esp when i'm driving. i tried to ignore her and it worked for about, oh, 35 nanoseconds. it finally got so bad i had to tap her on the leg and say "NO!" very firmly and that nipped it in the bud pretty quickly. DON'T cater to the screaming with toys; it reinforces the behavior. good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

Some children do things like this for "negative" reinforcement and they always get exactly what they are looking for. Providing your child has nothing wrong like ear aches, sickness, or any other ailments then it is time for you to look into the way kids that are hyperactive are taught as they like to use this form of action to get attention. Talk to some teachers and look for books to give you a way to work this to your advantage not his. It means you will teach him that you are in control not him and he will learn not to do some things-but keep watching as he sounds very cleaver and will work his "magic" on you to get what he wants. Good luck and remember you are the Mom and the one to teach him not the other way around.

I watched a little girl that was about 14 months old (I'd had her since she was 6 wks)& she picked up this horrible shrill scream & it was no apparent reason, she wasn't mad or anything. She did this constantly & it was ear piercing. The problem I had was her mother thought it was funny & would shriek back! I just gave her a firm NO & a serious look, then turned away & she would stop mid-scream/shriek. She quit after about 2-3 months. I feel for you! Hope you find something that works or he outgrows it.

It sounds to me like your son has found his volume button. LOL! I really don't think their is anything you can do. My son does it all the time! Eventually they all learn how to be quieter, but at 1 they have no concept of inside and outside voices.

My son did this, too.
I screamed back at him a few times, and he really liked to imitate my screams (higher pitched, lower pitched, with vibrato, without). He was experimenting with his voice, and I let him... at home. Also at home, because he liked imitating me, I would make other "noises" with my mouth... opening and closing my mouth to make a noise without voice, sticking out my tongue, etc. He would do it quietly, and I encouraged him. That way I could take him out and know I could distract him with quiet mouth experimentation.
Good luck!

Scream back. My daughter will be 1 in less than 2 weeks and she's trying so hard to speak. Screaming is just her way of trying to communicate. When we're at home, in the car, at grandma's, I scream back. I don't scream back in a blood curdling way. I just try to communicate with her in her own language so to speak. Some times we'll have a 10 or 20
minute conversation like that. When we're out in public and it's innappropriate to scream back to her, I make a point to still respond to her. She's communicating the only way she can for now.

I hear ya gurl. I have two boys. Our first son never was that loud until our second decided he wanted to use outside voice all the time. Screaming, the one that just drives you up the wall. I found that talking to them in a whisper helped to teach outside voice from inside. It sounds funky but hey it worked for us. I think that it is something that they just go through too though. Good luck hang in there it will stop.

J.,
I had the same problem with my youngest who is going to be 2 in July. I know that it is hard to listen to and it seems like he is never going to stop, but let me tell you, it is just a phase and he will eventually stop. My son did this for almost 6 months and we just kept ignoring it. It seemed like if we acknowledged the issue he would get even worse. Almost like it was a game to him. My ped. told us that it is just the child discovering he has a voice and not being sure how exactly to use it. I can promise you that this will get better, but until then Good Luck!

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