6 answers

Ringworm on the Scalp

My daughter (now 3 1/2) had ring worm on the back of her scalp in December 2010. It left a huge bald spot. Her hair will not grow back in that area. We've had her back to the doctor several times since then because, of course, the day care keeps thinking she still has it. The doctor told us at one point to rub olive oil on it and then brush all the flakes off with an old tooth brush and once the area is clear, the hair will begin to grow back. Well, that didn't work. I asked my hairdresser about it and she said she's had clients that have had ring worm on the scalp and their hair never grows back. She said it kills the shaft (or something like that).
Anyway, does anyone have any other advice? Or has this happened to one of your kids? Thankfully my daughter has a beautiful head of long hair but I don't want her having a big bald spot on her head for the rest of her life. It's only noticeable if we wear her hair in pig tails and sometimes when we wear it all down but we still know it's there. Once she reaches school age, I wouldn't want her getting picked on for it.

What can I do next?

More Answers

Your Dr was an idiot! If there are flakes on the bald spot, especially if they glow orange or green under an ultraviolet light than she DID still have it and the hair will not grow back if left untreated, olive oil and brushing isn't treating... that's for things like cradle cap. If she still has scales, she still has ringworm (which is a fungus). Ringworm on the scalp will cause permanent hairloss unless your child is prescribed a round of ORAL antibiotics, my 4 year old son was on Griseofulvin 125 mg, 1 1/2 teaspoon every 24 hours.

Our boys actually had to take 2 rounds of their medicine. They had ringworm all over their body, over 20 spots (we had gotten a new kitten) and they had several ringworm bald patches in their hair. The ones on the body cleared up in a few weeks, the ones on the scalp took almost 3 1/2 months... that is with the oral prescription antibiotics. Anti-fungal creams DO NOT WORK on scalp ringworm, they work perfectly fine on skin ringworm. I know this from dealing with it with my boys, from doing plenty of research and I am also a hairstylist. It has been such a long time with your daughter, it's a good chance the hair loss is permanent. Because we vigorously treated our boys, their hair grew back perfectly after a few months.

3 moms found this helpful

Maybe you should try humaworm, we are on it now. It claims not only kills parasites but also fungus( which is why my hubby drink it, because there is fungal infection in his lungs).
I once had a bald spot when I was 13, as big as one dolar coin. My mom put candlenut oil and massage the spot every night before bed, it worked! It also made hair thicker. It is very famous in Indonesia( where I come from).
How about using both methods? And don't drink too much antibiotics, it kills good bacteria. The fungal infection will be worsened.
Good luck. I hope your daughter problem solved soon.
I found this website, but maybe you can find it in amazon, too. http://www.thejamushop.com/kemiri_oil.htm

2 moms found this helpful

I have never heard of ringworm causing hair loss, because after being in the James River, I'd never have to shave my legs again if that were the case.

Take to her pediatrician. She's a girl. Her hair will grow long and cover the spot. Big deal if she DOES have a bald spot... don't teach her to be embarrassed about it, teach her to embrace it! I totally understand your concern as a mother, but if there's nothing that can be done, you have to have the right attitude about it going forward.

If she does wear pig tails or a pony tail or bun, make sure she has sunscreen on that spot.

2 moms found this helpful

She still has a fungal infection, which is really what ringworm is. I've had ringworm on various parts of my body, one time on my head and it wouldn't go away for six months until I tried this remedy:

First, get Bragg's Brand Apple Cider Vinegar with "The mother." Dilute it 1/2 and 1/2 with water and dab on the bald patch several times a day. It may burn, so if it does, dilute with more water. You can also do an apple cider vinegar rinse for her entire head. In this case, use one tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in one cup of water. Rinse with the vinegar after you shampoo, but before you condition. Leave the vinegar on for a little bit, then rinse and condition as usual. I highly suggest the rinse because it kills any fungus that might have spread.

Get a high-quality coconut oil and you can spread coconut oil on the bald patch. Coconut oil is anti fungal as well.

Tea tree oil also works for killing fungal infections but I found apple cider vinegar (has to be with "the Mother") to be safer.

You should also put her on acidophillus and cut out as much sugar and high fructose corn syrup as possible. That FEEDS the fungus.

I had a patch on my scalp for six months. The hair fell out and like you, I thought it was going to be permanent. However, doing the vinegar treatment every other day and the coconut oil every day PLUS a special supplement called Candex I was able to get rid of it. My hair grew back beautifully.

Also, I now use Trader Joe's brand Tea Tree shampoo and conditioner. It's reasonably priced and natural ingredients. The Tea Tree oil fights fungus and I haven't had it return!

Good luck!

2 moms found this helpful

Actually, ringworm on the scalp reactions are very different then anywhere else on the body. Yes, it can cause hair loss. Do a quick "ringworm of the scalp" google search, and you can read about it. Unfortunately, if she has hair loss, it won't come back. (My sister's all have bald spots, do to ring worm. I was not yet born, so I didn't get it.) If it's there, it's there. It does no good to make her insecure about it!! I'd say just deal with, and embrace it.

Kids will pick on kids for anything!! If you notice, though...it's rarely a confident child that gets picked on.

2 moms found this helpful

vibration massage is suppose to stimulate hair growth. No personal experience, I have just heard that.

1 mom found this helpful

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