8 answers

Red Dot on Son's Cheek

My five year old has a small red dot on his cheek that has been there for several months. It is not raised and doesn't hurt him. It just appeared one day and I kept expecting that it would go away. I have no idea what it is and how to get rid of it. Any ideas? Thank you!

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My son was the same age, he had a red circle on his cheek for over a month, it would get more red when he was outside in the heat. I took him to the doctor, they said it was a ringworm. They gave him an ointment to put on it, which took a while, but it eventually went away.

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My daughter also had a red dot on her cheek under her eye which the pediatrician said was a broken blood vessel. It took a very long time for it to finallly go away. I think 1 - 2 years. It never gave her any problems whatsoever. I would still have it checked out with your pediatrician just to be sure.

It is most likely an angioma. They are broken bloodvessels that appear on the face. I had a small circular one on my nose which a dermatologist burned off about 15 years ago. It really didn't hurt much but I have more now but now worried about it...Don't worry about it. Take him to a derm if worried.

My son was the same age, he had a red circle on his cheek for over a month, it would get more red when he was outside in the heat. I took him to the doctor, they said it was a ringworm. They gave him an ointment to put on it, which took a while, but it eventually went away.

My oldest daughter had a red raised spot on her cheek as a toddler that was there for about four months. The doctor and I both concluded that it probably was a spider bite. It eventually went away. She is now 4 years old with no trace of it. When I look back at pictures it is not very noticeable. Sorry I am not more help but I hope this is the same case for your son.

Hello -

When my daughter was 18 months, she developed a red dot on her cheek that would not go away. As it turns out, she had extremely dry skin and I had to get a prescription from the doctor. It was a prescription cream, which made the red dot go away within approximately 7-10 days. Every since then, I have kept her skin moisturized with Gold Bond Moisterizing Cream for sensitive skin and I've never had a problem. She is now almost 5 years old. Good Luck!

N.

My daughter had one of those at about the same age. I had it checked for skin cancer since she is blonde. It turned out to be just a dot of broken blood vessel that went away in about a year.

If it is a very small red dot, it could be a sign of a liver that is becoming toxic. The liver will use the skin to release toxins, which are why older people have all those brown spots, it is from years of the liver processing toxins and it is overloaded.

Not seeing the spot makes it hard to say. I know that there are things that you can do to support the liver, such as remove artificial colors and flavors from the diet. You can also support the liver with Milk Thistle, but the dosage should be 1/4 of the adult dosage. Try using natural cleaners and detergents in the home as well, which will cut down the amount of toxins in your environment. It is interesting when we start looking how many toxins are in our environment that can harm our children, such as carpeting, plastics, paints and cleaning products, even perfumes are toxic.

You can go to the health food store and look up liver toxicity in Prescription for Nutritional Healing or buy a copy as a reference for many ailments. It offers many helpful suggestions for all problems that humans can encounter.

It's probably nothing to worry about but if it's really bothering you to ease your mind get it checked out. It could or couldn't be a lot of things.

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