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Questions About Kindergarten

I have a 5 year old in KDg this year. He is bringing home addition problems already and is getting frustrated because he doesn't know how to figure them out. I have never heard of kindergardners learning addition so soon. my oldest went to school in MI for the first 5 years and I dont recall her learning addition that early. Is it me, or is it really early for them to be learning that? I dont want him to get frustrated and overwhelmed. If anyone has any suggestions on what to do to help him learn this easier, i would be greatly appreciative

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Thank you to everyone who responded to my request. All the info helped me realize that this is what happens in AZ. Its mind boggling the differences that each state has for teaching.

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Hi K.,
My son was in Kindergarten last year and yes they do learn simple addition in kindergarten. As a matter of fact he in in 1st grade now and bringing home double didgit subtraction and addition. He WILL catch on to the math. An easy way to get him to grasp the concept is to use visual manipulatives. such as mini marshmallows or goldfish crackers and in addition he'll get an afternoon snack while doing homework. for example if the math problem is 6+3= have him start with 6 marshmallows and explain in simple terms why, and have him add 3 more marshmallows to the six. then ask him how many he has all together. If he continues to do his math in the manner he will eventually grasp the idea and he won't need the manuulatives anymore. Do the same with subtraction. It worked for me and I think it will work for you too. good luck.

1 mom found this helpful

I volunteer in a Kinder class once a week for my teaching class and they actually do quite a bit of addition and a lot of reading. I was talking to their teacher about it and she said as far as standards go Kinderarten is first grade now. They also have homwork now which I never remember having that young. As far as helping him with my class when a child has a problem we use both hands one to hold up the number of the fingers of the first number we are adding and the other to hold up the second number and then have them count them that seemed to work pretty well. Teddy Grahams work to to count and then he also gets a reward.

1 mom found this helpful

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Well it is a new age since your last child they are getting him ready for his next grade level and I was told that they have an end of the school year math test that they all have to take...I have learned this through my sisters 6 year old who is also in Kindergardn...she was struggling with subtractions but she got it we my sister and I told her to go the finger method and she was successful and we didn't push her we told her she will learn and not to get frustrated and now she is happy...soon she will be learning addition and the teacher told me that a lot of the students will have a better time at this but try the finger method or use a favorite candy or jelly beans and set out the number of beans added to the next number...reenforce him that it takes time and he will get it...I don't know if this well help any but I am a single/divorced mother of a 4 year old...

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Hi K.,
When I went to Kindergarten, I didn't learn addition, or any kind of math until First Grade. However, I think it's great that they are teaching that in Kindergarten. You're right, he is young and it's a challenge for him, but work with him as much as possible when he's home and it will eventually be easier for him. You can use sticks, candy, or even when you bake cookies you can play a math game like how many cookies have we baked, or how many have you eaten, etc. You can use dry uncooked macaroni and glue it to a cardboard to make addition problems like 1 macaroni plus 1 more macaroni equals 2. You can use a marker for the plus/minus/equal signs in between the macaroni. It would be a fun project for you and your son as well. :-) Best wishes. I hope this helps. You actually helped me in a way because now I know what to expect when my son goes to Kindergarten. I'll start teaching him some addition and subtraction before hand so that he'll be better prepared. Thank you for that. :-) Take care, G.

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Welcome to the new world of "no child left behind". My daughter has also shocked me with the work that she brings home. She is in first grade and can completely read, and is doing word problems involving double digit addition and subtraction. Schools now have a national standard to meet and have to "cram" this stuff down our kids throats in order to be ready for the standardized testing that begins in 3rd grade. Sorry, this is now the norm and I wouldn't expect it to change much anytime soon!

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If he doesn't understand the process of addition, he's going to get more and more frustrated and overwhelmed. I think you should talk to the teacher to find out how it's being presented to the children. It should be done with lots of manipulatives (blocks etc...) that they can use to show the addition problem. It should be done in context of a word problem that they can understand- Josh has 4 cookies. His friend Kyle gives him 2 more. Now how many cookies does Josh have? At home, do that with him. Make it into a game where you practice addition, but in the context of a story. Find things to use at home that he can count. Do a lot of counting up with him. Give him a number to start with and have him count to the next number- for example, ask him to start at 5 and count up to nine- have him use his fingers, blocks, anything- then ask him how many he counted (4). THEN, show him that that is an addition sentence 5+4 = 9. It is early for them to have "naked" addition sentences where there is no context- that's why you should ask the teacher to explain how it's being taught- it may very well be in a word problem context at school with the use of counters, and the homework just isn't that way. Good luck.

1 mom found this helpful

my daughter is also in K they ahve been working toward adding since december. adding with cherios is great. have him take 4 cherios and add two more. we have been only working with single didgits all adding items or characters. just a couple weeks ago they started adding numbers. destiny charter school is wonderful. warner and cooper near mountainside fitness.

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I remember thinking it was early, too, but my kids also started bringing home addition problems in kindergarten. There is thid great learning store over by the Babies R Us on Ray Rd. This may be too far for you, so perhaps there is something similar in your area. In any case, they have all these activity books and games on just about every subject, for every age group. It made learning certain things more fun and a little less frustrating, particularly for my son. Hope this helped!

1 mom found this helpful

I volunteer in a Kinder class once a week for my teaching class and they actually do quite a bit of addition and a lot of reading. I was talking to their teacher about it and she said as far as standards go Kinderarten is first grade now. They also have homwork now which I never remember having that young. As far as helping him with my class when a child has a problem we use both hands one to hold up the number of the fingers of the first number we are adding and the other to hold up the second number and then have them count them that seemed to work pretty well. Teddy Grahams work to to count and then he also gets a reward.

1 mom found this helpful

Hi K.,
My son was in Kindergarten last year and yes they do learn simple addition in kindergarten. As a matter of fact he in in 1st grade now and bringing home double didgit subtraction and addition. He WILL catch on to the math. An easy way to get him to grasp the concept is to use visual manipulatives. such as mini marshmallows or goldfish crackers and in addition he'll get an afternoon snack while doing homework. for example if the math problem is 6+3= have him start with 6 marshmallows and explain in simple terms why, and have him add 3 more marshmallows to the six. then ask him how many he has all together. If he continues to do his math in the manner he will eventually grasp the idea and he won't need the manuulatives anymore. Do the same with subtraction. It worked for me and I think it will work for you too. good luck.

1 mom found this helpful

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