11 answers

Puberty - Boston,MA

Hi! So, i'm noticing some changes in my 9 year old daughter. I'm getting a little freaked (on the inside, don't worry, I'm not showing her that i'm freaked in any way...i am very good, calm and patient with her about everything) that things might start happening at a young age since I was very young (10)when things happened. Any advice for me? Is it always true that your daughter goes through the same things at the same age you were when you did? Any books that I should be reading with her. I don't want to freak her out to young but I don't want her to be caught off guard either. When did your daughters start showing signs of puberty? How long after the signs, did she get her period? Thanks!

1 mom found this helpful

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

Thanks for the book suggstions! I will definitely get those books.

Featured Answers

The American Girl care and keeping of you book is fantastic!! My 14 yr old still reads through it (she has had it for 5yrs).

More Answers

"Tweens" are from ages 9-12. This is the pre-teens.
Google search "Tween Development" and many good articles will come up.
Good info for the parent.

From 9 years old, they change. And hormonally too. Hence, their moods.

The books by "American Girl" are good. For this age. And for reading with the Mom. The title "The Care & Keeping Of You" is good.
Their series of books is good.
I would get some.
You can find it at bookstores and online.
It is age appropriate. Kid friendly.

You can always ask your Pediatrician too, about these matters.
They will explain to you.
I asked my Pediatrician.
My daughter is 8.5 years old.

1 mom found this helpful

My mom got me a "care package" from Tampax that had free samples but also a book for me and one for mom to discuss how our bodies work. I am not sure if companies still do this but it was pretty effective/informative. I got "the talk" when I was around 11 and did not get my period until almost 15.. but I was prepared and could provide info on the playground where girls do most of their talking about puberty anyways. I also want to second "It's Perfectly Normal" as a cool reference with easy to read and follow pages. I used it to teach health to Freshmen.
Good Luck, N.

I want to second (or third?) the vote for "The Care and Keeping of You" in the American Doll series. Our ped recommended it to us and I really liked it. I went through it with her and then gave it to her so that she could refer to it whenever she had a question. I also stressed that she could come to me. My older daughter started developing fairly early. When she was in 3rd grade, I found out that the 4th grade did this puberty night every year, where the kids all come to the school and the boys and their dads go to one room and the girls and moms go to another and there is someone there to talk to them about puberty. Even though my daughter was in 3rd grade, I asked if we could attend, since she was already developing a bit. She ended up getting her period in early 6th grade at age 11. I was 13 and my mom was 16 when she got hers, so I was a little surprised she was so young and I therefore wouldn't say that your daughter will do things at the same age as you did. My younger daughter is nowhere near where my older one was at her age (10). I started talking to my older daughter at about 9, but I haven't said anything yet to my 10 year old, although I know I should be thinking of doing that about now. I would start talking to your daughter, but keep it light and simple. You don't have to cover everything in one talk. Just let her know she'll be getting a period and what it entails for her and deal with the details a little later. Good luck!

Both of my stepdaughters started to develop breasts just before 5th grade when they were 10.5 ish. And by the end of 6th grade (now, for the youngest who's 12 and the other is 14) they were both busty for their age (B cup on a small frame). When I took the younger in for her 12 year well check this last February the pediatrician said that a girls period usually arrives 2 years after breasts begin to develop. That being said, she was right about that for my 14 year old and we're waiting for AF to show up any time in the next few months for my 12 year old.

Good luck!!

I'm going through the same thing! In January, we started noticing our daughter has gotten curvy and packed on a few pounds. She is very moody and emotional. I took her for her 9 yr check-up in April. The doctor didn't see any real signs of puberty yet, but those hormones are working. A good book to read is: The Care and Keeping of You: The Body Book for Girls (American Girl).

The American Girl care and keeping of you book is fantastic!! My 14 yr old still reads through it (she has had it for 5yrs).

Americian girl has some great books . I started talking at 9 and she is 11 and we are close but not yet. I think they form a lot of other things before they actually got their peirod. I got mine at 11 and she will pass me. Dr. told me it looks like it will be 12 when she starts.

p.s. Hello God , it is me Margarat is a great one to read too her.... but maybe in 6 months to a year.

My girls started the breast development around 6th grade (age 10/11). And, they are typical of the 6th grade girls. My older daughter got her period about a year - 1 1/2 years later. Although I know some girls that have gotten their period in 6th grade. my older one really hasn't been moody or gotten cramps or anything. Yes, I'm very thankful! I think that age 9 is appropriate to have that talk. Let her know that even if her period doesn't start, she could help out a friend who may not have had that talk yet, since she'll know what to do. Maybe have her wear a thin pad around the house on a weekend so she'll know what to expect.

1 / 3
Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.