22 answers

Pros and Cons?

I have a friend that is now pregnant with her third child, she is 20 weeks along. Her second child just turned one in November and we were nervous for her when she anounced that she was pregnant again. This is because she just got over her post partum depression in late august. So as her friends we thought she should give it a little more time. However, it is her family and her decisions so we are happy for her and say a little prayer every night. My question to all you smart women out there is this. Our friend claims that she is going to refuse to breastfeed this child because she regreted starting with the other two. Which again as her friends we were fine with I have given my child formula and I do not have a problem with it. However, now she is talking about giving her newborn goats milk. I can't find any information on goats milk and newborns so if any of you ladies have any information wether it is go or bad I would apprecitate it.

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So What Happened?™

Thank you ladies for all of your information. All of you have confirmed what I was thinking. My friend is planning on doing this because of their financial situation, but after reading what you ladies have said I am going to really encourage her to look into the consequences more. At the end of the day it is her life and her children and her decision but I will be praying for them.

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My son was actually on goat's milk for the first year of his life because he was allergic to formula. From goat's milk he went to soy milk. Only now that he is 18 can he actually drink regular milk.

Goats milk can be modified for safe, human-baby consumption - but it doesn't come that way. It, because it doesn't have to double the brain mass while only increasing in overall size by double in the first year. Goats grow different parts of their bodies in different ways from human infants, and are nearly adults in a year -- what will take a human child 16-20 to accomplish.

PPD almost always starts in pregnancy, actually, and is often marked by 'absolutes' like what she will not do with this one. One factor that makes PPD dramatically worse is the sense the mother has that the child would be better off without her, that she is replaceable.

It is easy to feel replaceable when 'anyone' can feed the child, and clearly 'anyone' is better at taking care of it.

Strongly suggest to this mother to make arrangements now for counseling, starting now, and to have progesterone shots as early as possible after the birth (the sudden drop in progesterone seems a factor in making moms crazy in the first weeks after birth).

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Unpasteurized goat's milk is a poor substitute for breast milk or formula. Goat's milk is low in Vitamin D and it is also low in iron, Vitamin B12 and folate, which can lead to an iron deficiency or megaloblastic anemia (low blood counts). Goat's milk is also very susceptible to brucellosis, a bacterial infection in animals that can be passed on to your infant.
If you are going to feed your infant goat's milk, make sure that you use a commercially prepared pasteurized form or boil it yourself. You will also need to give vitamin supplements to ensure that your child is getting enough iron, Vitamin B12 and folate.

For children with an allergy to milk proteins or lactose and who can not breast feed or tolerate a cow's milk based formula, a better alternative to goat's milk would be a soy formula (like Isomil or Prosobee) or an elemental formula (such as Nutramigen, Alimentum, or Pregestamil).

i got this from :

http://www.keepkidshealthy.com/newborn/newbornquicktips/g...

1 mom found this helpful

Hello M...I hope the below information will help you to help out your friend. H.

If you do find you need to supplement your breastmilk with some other liquid, goat's milk is not the best choice. It is low in iron, folate and vitamins C and D. It has a high solute load relative to cow's milk and very high relative to mother's milk and may cause metabolic acidosis if fed in the first month of life. I

nfants below the age of one year should not be fed cow milk, goat milk, or soy beverage. These milks are low in iron and differ in the protein composition compared to mothers milk. Since infants depend so much on milk, it is likely that they will develop an iron deficiency if they consume cow, goat or soy beverage.

Really, breast feeding or infant formula are the way to go, with breast feeding most superior. The iron in breast milk is highly bio-available and will cover the needs for the infant until about the age of 6 months. After that, the Academy of Pediatricians suggests, infants should be supplemented with iron-fortified infant cereals (such as rice cereal), while ideally breast feeding should be continued until at least the age of one.

Another reason that infants should not be fed cow or goat milk is because of the protein. Breast milk is higher in whey and much lower in casein compared to cow and goat milks. Casein is more difficult to digest than whey and may lead to internal gastrointestinal bleeding, which again, could lead to iron deficiency.

There are also mineral differences among breast milk, cow milk and goat milk. Goat milk, in particular, is low in the B vitamin folic acid.

1 mom found this helpful

Breastmilk is absolutely the best nutrition for a newborn. Infant formula is second. ANY other milk (cow, goat, soy, etc) is absolutely inadequate nutrition for an infant under 1. Different formulas are based on different milks, so perhaps she meant a goat milk formula?? This issue should definitely be discussed with her pediatrician.

It is absolutely untrue that she should avoid breastfeeding to avoid PPD. Breastfeeding will HELP reduce severity of PPD - oh those wonderful hormones! I wonder why she regrets breastfeeding with her first two children? Breastfeeding is natural, but that doesn't meant it is always easy - especially in the beginning. Breastfeeding support should be available through her pediatrician, her prenatal care provider, or the La Leche League.

I would also suggest (if you can) that she talk to her prenatal care provider about her depression. Many, many women experience this during and after pregnancy and there is help. Even though you say she got over PPD in August, depressive tendencies are still there, and depending on how she responds to this new pregnancy, she could already be having issues again. The regretting breastfeeding comment, and the fact that she's thinking about a risky decision about the goats milk seems to me to be someone who might be having more depressive thoughts. It might not be, but it's definitely something to watch out for.

1 mom found this helpful

Ask her why she wouldnt give herself the chance to not go thru Postpartum with all the nautural chemicals that relax your body with breastfeeding. At least a few months as her hormones calm down. Not every pregnancy brings on postpartum, but the best thing to beat it is nursing.

My doctors always said formula for babies. If there is formula made from goat's milk, fine, but any type of "milk" alone is not enough for the babies, of course unless it's breast milk. She should consult her doctor first. Perhaps your doctor can provide you with literature to present to her. Otherwise her baby can severely suffer from things like anemia.

Goats milk can be modified for safe, human-baby consumption - but it doesn't come that way. It, because it doesn't have to double the brain mass while only increasing in overall size by double in the first year. Goats grow different parts of their bodies in different ways from human infants, and are nearly adults in a year -- what will take a human child 16-20 to accomplish.

PPD almost always starts in pregnancy, actually, and is often marked by 'absolutes' like what she will not do with this one. One factor that makes PPD dramatically worse is the sense the mother has that the child would be better off without her, that she is replaceable.

It is easy to feel replaceable when 'anyone' can feed the child, and clearly 'anyone' is better at taking care of it.

Strongly suggest to this mother to make arrangements now for counseling, starting now, and to have progesterone shots as early as possible after the birth (the sudden drop in progesterone seems a factor in making moms crazy in the first weeks after birth).

Absolutely no on goats milk for a newborn. Tell your friend to talk to her pediatrician - it doesn't have what a newborn needs. Also, one response said it's best not to breastfeed if you have had PPD in the past. This is totally untrue. Breastfeeding certainly can help with PPD - look it up on the internet - Post Pardum Depression and breastfeeding. You will find so much information.

M.,
Don't take this the wrong way, but did your friend ask for information or is this what she has decided? If she has decided this, it is really not for you to tell her what to do even if you don't agree (hard to do I understand). If she wants info, suggest she ask her pediatrician.

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