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Pregnant with Fibromyalgia

Has any out there been pregnant with fibromyalgia? If so, how did it go? My husband would like to add to our family and I am very nervous. I have had fibro since 2006 and found a way to manage it very well. I am nervous about getting off of medications and labor with fibro. Also, a little nervous about bringing a little one into our home when I require so much extra sleep. Please let me know if anyone has personally been through this. Thanks :)

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Hi K.,

I would like to share some information with you about nutritional supplementation for fibromyalgia. There are supplements that you can take to overcome fibromyalgia in advance of a pregnancy. There are also ones that you can take throughout pregnancy that would be most beneficial to you. The most important product that I would like to share with you is called Genesis. It is a 100% juice nutritional drink that provides 2 miracle molecules, resveratrol and ellagic acid. It is a very effective product that also works as an anti-inflammatory and pain reliever. You can find out more about it if you watch the videos at www.symmetrydirect.com/dhendon

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D. Hendon, RDH, SMM
Victorious Living with Symmetry Direct
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My pregnancy went very well wtih Lupus and Fibromyalgia. My son is now 12 and is just used to knowing that I need a daily nap. My husband agreed up-front to helping out more than the typical father and everything has gone well.
Good luck!

Hi K.
I myself don't have fibro but my mother does and has suffered for many many years. I am very familiar with the disease and all the auto immune problems that go along with it. You mentioned that you have it under control very well. If you were to get pregnant that disrupts the whole kit and cabbodle of auto immune problems which could put you into a full flair-up and may have to start from square one all over again.
Good luck I know it's a very tough decision to make.
B.

Hi, I am a mom of 4 and have had myofascial/ fibro , been through a chronic pain program, meds, etc.

I had to get off my meds to have my last children and have gone on to get well. I actually found I was better during my pregnancies because of the hormone changes.

Anyway, fibro is an immune system challenge and has a huge toxicity/ body burden component. ... I am also now a nutritional consultant and after bringing healing to my body through natural means, restoring the foundation of my body, I have chosen to help others. I work with the immune system challenges, cancer support nutrition, add/hd autism support.

I would encourage you to watch:

www.sharethecause.com/live

This is a 10 minute documentary which outlines the challenges we face in full...

Also..

www.ewg.org...

this is the environmental working group website... click on the "human toxome project" another documentary you will find very interesting and informative.

I can be reach via the 'share the cause' documentary if you so desire to talk about what you can do now, naturally and safely to bring healing to the foundation of the body and get ready for pregnancy.

Have a great day..L. M.

Hi K.,

I am glad that I can finally discus a topic I know really really well. I was diagnosed with FMS in 2004. I remarried in 2005 and discovered I was pregnant in December of the same year. I had not even considered my FMS affecting my pregnancy. Not to mention, I had no help from my current husband considering he still thought my FMS was in my head. My first doctor appointment was the eye opener. My doctor informed me that my FMS will either get better with pregnancy or get worse. Basically, it will be a ride and all I could do at that point was just hold on and see where the track led me. Needless to say a lot of it got better. The only thing is that my weight got out of control. As I am sure you know that is one thing that comes along with FMS. My ankles became cankles for the last 3 months. I teetered with diabetes, but seemed to keep it under control with my diet. My labor was more painful, but I also think that a lot of that came from the Pitocin. Never the less, I did ask for some meds (which I never had with my other two prefibro) and was getting ready to be prepped for an epidural when it became time to start pushing. All in all, my labor was approximately 2 hours long, but it seemed like an eternity. If you can avoid Pitocin (the devil’s juice), do it. I really feel that is what caused my labor (and pain) to be so much more intense. If you would like any details or have any more questions…please ask. I am glad to help. Yet, bottom line, your doctor should be the first one to check with. Just make sure you find someone who also understands FMS. Good Luck! You can do it if you change your mind setting!

God bless! C. 

Hi K. - I wanted to give you a link to check that addresses fibromyalgia and the use of mangosteen juice: http://www.insidemangosteen.com/powerx/written-f.html
I hope that will help you. I believe you will find the answers to your questions and make the right decision for yourself, hubby, kids and any future baby you are blessed with. Sincerely, V. G. :o) www.referralco-op.com and www.findgreenhere.com

I was pregnant with both my kids and have had Fibromyalgia since I was 23 and I am now 39. Actually when I was pregnant I felt my best. My doctor told me that I would feel better because of all the extra hormones and endorphines running through me. And he was right. What helped was that I walked almost every single day. As far as the sleep goes. Just sleep when the baby sleeps. That is the hardest part. You may want to enlist some family and friends to help you out in the beginning. As you know sleep is the most important and having someone come in for a couple of hours to stay with the baby while you sleep I would highly suggest it. Have a schedule worked out with you and your spouse that he can get up with the baby on certain nights so that you get a good solid sleep or try to get solid sleep. Also check with your doctor to see what medications you can or cannot take if you decide to breast feed. I hope this helps.

K.,
It sounds like you are not currently pregnant, so...

I have fibro and stayed on my meds throughout pregnancy. I am on a very low dose of nefadozone to regulate my sleep cycles. Unfortunately, I discovered during my 2nd trimester (with my first and only child) that I also have Multiple Sclerosis (found out because I had a flare). I really didn't notice any issues w/the fibro, but I was pretty distracted by the MS symptoms I was having. I went through labor w/out meds (not on purpose; long story) and was fine. People w/ fibro have brains that overeact to pain stimuli, but we also have unusually high tolerance for pain. Studies have shown both of these points to be true. My concern for you is the way you phrased your question, that your husband wants to expand your family. Do you? Fatigue is a real issue with young kids, not only because they can be exhausting, but also because they cannot understand why mommy sleeps so much, etc. I would never say to anyone with fibro not to have kids. At the same time, I am wondering how much your husband is willing to commit to taking on a large portion of caring for a new baby. Can you afford to leave your job, and do you even want to? My MS adds even more fatigue, but luckily my husband is a very involved dad. However, I have to warn you that it really hurt when my son always called for his dad when he had a scary dream, etc. My husband had always been the one to get up in the middle of the night and in the morning with him to allow me more sleep so that I could minimize the chances that I would flare. We sold our house when our son was two, and he took the realtor for a tour and pointed to the kitchen and said it was daddy's room and pointed to our bedroom and said it was mommy's room. That stank. I have since been put on stronger anti-fatigue meds, which have helped, and my son now comes to me as much as his dad. He has understood since he was about 4 that I have an illness that makes me unusually tired. Also, it's hard to have the patience a little one requires when you are so tired. If *you* want a baby, I'm sure you will find a way to overcome all of this, and, while going off your fibro meds could be an issue (if you have to go off of them), doing so will not cause you any long term disability, etc. I very much wanted to have a baby -- he was my first, and I managed to deal with these issues. However, if it's really more your husband who wants a new baby, I would definitely think twice. Originally my husband and I wanted to have two kids. However, we agreed that we should focus the little energy I have on the child we already have. Then again, everyone's situation is different, and with MS I really have to manage disability progression. I guess what I'm trying to say is not to have another child if you would be doing so primarily because your husband wants you to. If you want a new baby just as much, go for it, and see if you really have to go off your meds or if you could just reduce the dose. In addition to my OB, I saw a doc that does nothing but work with these kinds of meds. He knew them inside out and was able to tell me that the only reason that any docs had concerns about me was because there was a single case of a baby with failure to thrive, and that mom had been on a far higher dose than I (more than twice as much per dose and two times a day, whereas I took mine only at night) and that they had not proven that the drug caused this one case. My son is now a happy, healthy 5.5 year-old.

I have FMS myself. I can only tell you my experience so far. I am 38 weeks pregnant, and must admit that my pregnancy has not been the easiest. I did some reading and asking around. Everything I read states that your first pregnancy is the one that is tough, after that your body knows what its doing pretty much and subsequent pregnancies are not that bad. I also read that with labor, you should not attempt it without meds, but that it had been done, really depends on the woman and her tolerance for pain, but remember that most people with FMS do not have the greatest tolerance for pain (actually they probably do, but their pain receptors work sooo much better than others) Sorry I could not help more.

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