11 answers

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome-PLease Advise-all Help Appreciated!

I went to my OBGYN this AM and hs said that I might have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. I am 30 years old and want to expand our family more. We have three beautiful babies and it tears my heart out to think that I may not be able to have another. The Dr told me that it could only cause difficulty getting pregnant. I am still unsure though. Has anyone ever heard of this?? Does anyone else have this?? Can anyone offer any adivice for me?? Thanks to all!

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So What Happened?™

I wanted to take a min and thank everyone for their replies and the advice that you gave. It made me feel better to read them. We are going to wait a year and try for baby four. I am going to get into shape-I hope- and really try to get health and in balance in preparation. thanks so much to all that offered advice and kind words!!!

More Answers

T., go grab the book THE FERTILITY DIET by Jorge E. Chavarro and Walter C. Willett, both drs/researchers at Harvard. It just came out--in fact, I just picked up one of the first copies in circulation at the library. I heard Dr. Willett being interviewed on NPR, and had to read it. It specifically addresses ovulation issues--which is exactly the prob with PCOS. It's so informative and is based on findings of a great research project: The nurses' health study. Let me know if you have trouble getting a copy, and Ill return mine right away!

Here are basic 10 things they found that played a big role in women who have problems with ovulation:
1. cut out trans fats
2. increase unsaturated vegies oils (olive, canola)
3. increase plant proteins (beans, nuts) and reduce red meat (occasional is fine, chicken/fish better though)
4. go for whole grains (highly refined carbs have too quick of an affect on blood sugar and thus insulin)
5. have at least one serving of whole milk / ice cream / full fat yogurt each day. bag the skim and reduced fat for a bit, but do be aware of the additional calories if weight is an issue for you; this is actually very important because estrogen and porgesterone attach themselves to milkfat, while androgens just hang around in the regular liquidy part of the milk. If you're drinking your 3c/day of skim, you're just getting a nice dose of androgens, rather than the additional e & p to balance things out
6. take a multivitamin (w/ folic acid & the other B vits)
7. get lots of iron, but from sources other than red meat (if I remember correctly, healthy amounts of folic acid and iron increased the likelihood of not only pregnancy but also fraternal twins in several studies)
8. no sweetened pops! too much of a sugar kick! drink water!
9. need a healthy weight. "If you are overweight, losing between 5 and 10 percent of your weight can jump-start ovulation."
10. daily exercise, if you're not already working out regularly; but don't get too much, you do want some fat on your body!
11. this is the "by the way" one: don't smoke! Not proven by the nurses health study since so few women smoked and were trying to get pregn, but there are enough studies out there, they say, that point out smoking lessens your likelihood of pregnancy, as well as increase the risk of miscarriage.

I found that many of these things I was already doing (1, 2, 3, 4, 5--due to a get-together with some friends that resulted in leftover ice cream, 6, 8, 9, 11). Turns out, the pregn tests that my hubby and I picked up right after getting this book from the library showed we are already preg!

With my dd, it took us 15 months to get her. At the time, I was about 25-30lb overweight--but did lose 18 lb exercising with a preg friend during that time, I ate mostly red meat (gr beef was cheap at the time), rarely ate beans, and avoided whole milk like the plague. I was on a very low dose of metformin at the time (500mg/day, I was working my way up to a normal dose so that I didn't get any annoying side affects), but the dr. I met with upon learning I was preg (I was in a different state at the time) didn't think it had anything to do with the metformin.

I do hope this helps, and I wish you the very best!

1 mom found this helpful

Hi T.. My sister has polycystic. She currently has two children. The second one she had after finding out that she had polycystic. Yes, it does cause some difficulty in getting pregnant and it can also cause some difficulty in carrying a baby to term. My sister had problems with pre-term labor with both of her pregnancies.

But all is not lost. There are fertility drugs and also a diabetes medication called Metformin (or Glucophage) that can help. Metformin is not FDA approved for polycystic but studies have shown that it is effective in relieving the side effects of the syndrome. My sister was on Metformin prior to becoming pregnant with her second child. It may be something that you may want to consider and talk to your doctor about.

Also here's a link that may be helpful:

http://www.4woman.gov/faq/pcos.htm

Best Wishes!

J.

1 mom found this helpful

Hi T.,

I have also been diagnosed with PCOS and was put on Metformin to conceive. I've now got a beautiful 10-month old (my second) sitting on my knee as I write this, so you just need to work with your doctor to find the answers that will best suit your situation.

There are a number of women on these boards with PCOS ... so hopefully you will hear from more of them. Where are you located?

/K.

1 mom found this helpful

Good Morning,

I was diagnosed with PCOS also. I DID have problems getting pregnant, but since you already have 3, and assuming you didn't have a problem getting pregnant, I wouldn't think you would have a problem next time. Even IF you do have a problem, I don't think it would be one that could not be worked around....make sense? I think it would be minor in the whole pregnancy world. I wouldn't worry :)

Did your OB/Gyn put you on medication?

1 mom found this helpful

I have not read the other responses so I apologize if any of my information is a repeat for you.
I too have PCOS. I probably had it my whole adult life and no one knew. I guess it was unheard of in the 70's and not much was known if anything about it in the 80's. Anyway, I have most of the symptoms, except skin tags and they werent able to detect any cysts at the time. I found out about it when I went to an RE because we had been trying to get preggo for a couple of years. They told me we could try clomid but I had done some research and did not want to go that route if at all avoidable. Meanwhile the dr put me on Metformin (Glucophage). It helps w/ PCOS symptoms, but it is a diabetic drug. It regulated my cycle the first month and the 2nd month I was pregnant.
I strongly suggest that you ask your dr. to put you on this first and foremost. It will treat your symptoms "naturally" and in turn may help you lose some weight which may contribute to you getting pregnant. So even if you werent trying to get preggo, if the pcos is bothersome it couldnt hurt to take the metformin (dr supervised of course)
We had an appt. to start the clomid and then an IUI, but it never came to that, thank GOD.
Also discuss w/ your dr. about staying on metformin for a bit once you get pregnant. Women w/ pcos carry a higher rate of miscarriage, so staying on the metformin will help prevent that. I was being seen by 2 different dr's at the time and we got our wires crossed and I went off the metformin. So my first trimester was very stressful, I feared I would miscarry. But I didnt. I also got pregnant again when that baby was only 6months old. So there is hope out there, dont give up and dont despair.
Also check out www.soulcysters.com
Let us know what happens...

1 mom found this helpful

I have PCOS and one DS and one DD on the way. It's not the end of the world, but it is difficult to conceive. Each person has a degree of difficulty. I have a friend who has a mild case, she's due end of August. I'm due August 3rd with my 2nd. BUT I used fertility treatments. Sometimes you can control it with diet and exercise. Some can't. Metformin also helps control symptoms and sometimes regulates women. I suggest you see a reproductive endo doctor. OBs/Gyns don't have MUCH information on the topic at hand!

B.

1 mom found this helpful

Check out the website www.womentowomen.com. There is tons of info there on women's issues, and more help than I've ever gotten from traditional MDs. I've been given many of the same treatments and recommendations by my naturopath as well.

I started having problems when I was 13 and was diagnosed at 17. I have had some miscarriages, but I have a beautiful little girl. I also have a hormone imbalance that didn't help. When I got pregnant with my daugher, I had to take progestin suppositories to be able to carry her to term.

Since you already have three(I'm assuming you didn't have any trouble with those) you should be fine. Just keep trying and if you don't have success after a year, then talk to your doc about treatment. That's what the Dr. will tell you to do anyway. In the meantime, just try to prepare your body like you did with the others. Oh, don't do any heavy lifting or strenuous activity. I know that can be hard with three children, but at least try. Good luck.

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