7 answers

Poll: Does Anyone Have an Infant or Toddler with Very "Creaky" Joints?

My sons shoulders, elbows and ankles crack a lot but mostly his shoulders. We have asked our ped and the question was blown off. His dad has bad shouders could it be genetic?

What can I do next?

More Answers

I have learned after going rounds with several doctors regarding my son's health, that Doctors often require high-level communication skills when trying to convey concerns and get information. Did you ever find yourself in a math class completely lost because the teacher seemed to be talking over and around your head and not directing your specific questions? We want our doctors super-educated, but sometimes the communication is the casualty. Personally, I'd rather work on my own communication skills than settle for a better communicator with less medical knowledge.

We have to take more responsibility in the process. While there are some doctors out there who just don't care (especially about parental input), there are options. If you honestly feel like your child's provider is not providing the best in care because they don't listen to the primary care giver, change providers. Keep in mind, though, sometimes your concerns are related to such simple or mundane and normal processes of the body it doesn't seem like much of a talking point to them. Always be ready and willing to assert yourself. It's for your kid. No one will blame you.

There are a lot of details necessary to discern exactly what might be causing your son's popping joints. If he is very young, it could just be that his body is still developing. Young children have a lot more cartilidge. It's one of the reasons they are generally more nimble and ressiliant than adults. If you are concerned, though: Don't let it go. Next doctor's visit, go in prepared with a detailed outline of the rate of occurance, dietary intake, and any corrolations you may have noticed.

Best wishes to you and your dealings with the medical profession.

2 moms found this helpful

Doctors blow off patients because they dont care. Sad but true. They are ONLY there to dispense pharmacetical drugs. You cannot count on them for your children's health. You will have to do your own digging.

Cracking bones and popping joints are NOT normal. Just because the occurence is now increasing in the population, it should not be acceptable.

When I was a kid, no children were sick. One child in the whole school- maybe. Now sickness in children is rampant. One child in the school is well! Why? I think it has something to do with the foods they are now eating.

I have a 13 yr old who I fed high amounts of soy as an infant/toddler. She started getting ill at two. No doctor has helped me to get her well. She continued to deteriorate. It is my own research that may get her well.
From a culmination of research i suspect that her joint pop and pains, (and now in her spine and thigh muscles) have been at least in part due to high vit D and calcium levels in food - that cause rickets and hypocalcemia.
The research is out there.
When vit D was first researched, they used people in convalecent homes who never saw sun. That is how they eventually got it put in our food- from those original hogwash trials. Vit d is a SECOSTERIOD/hormone. It causes disease when put in food.. It should only be gotten from the sun.

Here is some research for you on vit D/calcium:
http://www.mgwater.com
I now use watered down cream for here milk. And I give her magnesium supplements.

1 mom found this helpful

Same thing here...the pediatrician doesn't seem concerned!

1 mom found this helpful

A joint popping just means there is extra fluid in the area causing the suction which to us sounds like a pop. Unless your son seems to be in pain it shouldn't be an issue. Every joint in my body pops/cracks all the time and that is that is what orthopedic surgeons tell me when I get checked.

Just keep an eye on his reaction when it happens. If his hip ever starts clicking and popping every time his leg moves then definitely bring that to the attention of your pediatrician and don't let him pass it off!

1 mom found this helpful

I've had this for as long as I can remember. I believe there is a genetic component to it b/c I recall my paternal grandmother, my father and several of his siblings have this same issue. There is absolutely no pain or other negative issue associated w/ it, so I would tell you not to worry about it. Its just loud and weird. I do notice that when I exercise a lot (like walking 7 miles) then my ankles and knees will be particularly noisey. Other people think its odd, but I'm used to it and b/c it really doesn't bother me I don't even notice it sometimes.

My father would tell me stories about how his mother would try to sneak up on them once she put them to bed (there were 4 little boys in the room, so needless to say, they liked to talk and giggle instead of going to sleep) but since her joints were so loud they always heard her coming and would pretend like they were sleep by the time she made it to their room. =)

I'm sorry the doctor brushed you off, but I'm willing to bet that your son simply has loud joints.

ps. I'm 37, my father is 73 and my grandmother would have been 92. That says to me that it is very doubtful that it is the use of Vitamin D supplements that is causing the popping. My father's family was VERY poor and didn't necessarily have the same access to food that I now have. And, they worked in the fields so they were always exposed to the sun.

1 mom found this helpful

My 2/12 year old son does. Since he was about 9 months old we have been hearing cracking noises coming from different parts of his body. We have brought it to the attention of his pedi and he didn't seem to care either.

1 mom found this helpful

my son just turned a year old and for the longest time i would hear his bones cracking, I too brought it to his dr's attention and she wasn't concerned. It has slowed down some.

1 / 3
Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.