22 answers

Non Flame Resistant Pajamas Everywhere?

hi there,
can anyone tell me whats up with the new warning labels on all the pjs? i went to target to get some new pjs got home and noticed a tag saying :for childs safety, garment shoudl fit snugly, this garment is not flame resistant loose fitting garment is more likely to catch fire. so i didnt feel comfy keeping these so i ran to kohls to grab a few and almst every pair of pjs had this tag i was shocked and could barely find any that didnt hve this tag. these were mostly carters brand at kohls and the target ones were target brand. i was able to find a few at kohls that actually said ON the pj itself, that they were indeed flame resistant! can anyone tell me whats up with this and should i not buy the ones with this tag????
thanks!

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

My oldest is almost 8 and I don't remember these tags ever NOT being on pajamas. I think pretty much every pair I've ever bought has had this tag, it's not a new thing. If you can find some that actually are flame resistant that's great but I think you're going to find the tag more often than not.

Good luck,
K.

1 mom found this helpful

I agree with the rest of the moms, i don't want flame retardant on my kids pj in fact my kids sleep in a t-shrt and then pj bottoms. Those chemicals are bad stuff and causing all kinds of dangers and diseases.

More Answers

I actually seek out non-flame resistant pajamas for my daughter. The chemicals used to make the fabric flame resistant will leach out and be absorbed through your childs skin.

For years TRIS has been used in Pajamas, until it was banned in 1977 for causing cancer.
After that PBDE's were the retardant of choice for textile applications. That stuff accumulates in the food chain and has been implicated in effects on brain development and possible environmental effects, especially in large predators (whales for example). Through direct exposure and the food chain they also accumulate in human fatty tissue and are excreted in breast milk...mother with high levels of PBDE's will pass on the chemicals to their children, long after the chemicals have been banned (they have been phased out in 2004)
Nowadays most fabrics are treated with PROBAN. The chemicals to to produce it are linked to genetic defects, damage to liver, skin and nervous systems. It might also cause cancer.

If your child wears a tight fitting sleeping garment and you practice common sense fire prevention you should be fine without exposing your child to potentially dangerous chemicals.
Good luck!

3 moms found this helpful

I think they only include those tags for liability purposes. Just because something is not flame retardant doesn't mean it's more flammable than anything else one would normally wear. It would never occur to me to specifically purchase flame retardant clothes. Besides, even if you did, the coating that they use would wash off after a couple of times in the laundry. Your efforts are better spent making sure your child isn't in a situation where his clothes, flame retardant or not, would catch fire in the first place.

2 moms found this helpful

Read up on PBDE toxicity and danger to children before you put those jammies on your children. Flame-retardant chemicals may well be phased out of all kids clothing in coming years, because their toxicity is proven, not only in children but in the general environment, and they have been found in children's blood in much higher concentrations than in their parents.

Here's one link to get you started: http://www.ewg.org/reports/pbdesintoddlers

Danger of clothing catching fire is iffy, and can be effectively addressed in other ways. Danger of PBDE exposure is real and constant.

2 moms found this helpful

The chemicals that make the pajamas flame resistant are nasty and can be absorbed through the skin. Since our children are exposed to SO many non tested chemicals, it's nice to be able to stay away from those we know we should avoid-flame retardants being in that category.

1 mom found this helpful

I actually avoid flame resistant stuff because of the chemicals. I've always tried to buy cotton sleepwear, since nylon can melt to your skin if exposed to flame.

1 mom found this helpful

My oldest is almost 8 and I don't remember these tags ever NOT being on pajamas. I think pretty much every pair I've ever bought has had this tag, it's not a new thing. If you can find some that actually are flame resistant that's great but I think you're going to find the tag more often than not.

Good luck,
K.

1 mom found this helpful

Flame resistant jammies are loaded with chemicals... I NEVER buy them if I can help it. They have so many bad things on them it's terrible. So you should always buy non flame resistant ones.

You don't walk around in flame resistant clothes all day... jammies shouldn't be any different, it's kinda silly to me, especially when they are laced with terrible chemicals that you wear and are soaking into your skin.

1 mom found this helpful

I don't like the idea of flame resistant jammies. I don't want the chemicals they use to treat the fabric next to my kids' skin for 10+ hours each night. Instead of traditional jammies we opt for shorts or long pants made out of jersey and t shirts.

1 mom found this helpful

1 / 3
Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.