18 answers

New Moles on a 6 Year Old

Last year my son developed a dark brown mole the size of an eraser on his back. It was one of those that is raised above the skin slightly. The docotr at the time said that there was nothing wrong with that. The other day he was getting ready to play in the sprinkler and I noticed more of these moles. Now he has about 8 ofthem all over his back and chest. I am concerned about them, but I also don't want to rush him to the doctor for something that could be normal. Has anyone had a child get these this early and quickly in life? What were the results?

Concerned Mom

1 mom found this helpful

What can I do next?

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My 6 yr old also has developed some small dark raised moles in the past yr. I asked the Dr. and asked other Drs in the practice if I happen to see someone diff and they all tell me the same thing....normal but if one appears that is a funny color (not even) or has undefined edges or grows at a rapid rate then to be concerned. If the edges are smooth and it seems contained, its nothing but a mole. If you think its something or need piece of mind, see a derm.

More Answers

My two boys have several moles already and they are 3 and 1. I have lots of moles so I expect they will, too.

See a dermatologist if you want, but I think it's fine. Make sure he NEVER gets a sunburn, though.

Hi R., I looked it for you from webmd.com. It is nothing to worry about but it doesnt hurt to have a dermotologist take a look at it.

Moles are growths on the skin that are usually brown or black. Moles can appear anywhere on the skin, alone or in groups.

Most moles appear in early childhood and during the first 20 years of a person's life. Some moles may not appear until later in life. It is normal to have between 10-40 moles by adulthood.

As the years pass, moles usually change slowly, becoming raised and/or changing color. Often, hairs develop on the mole. Some moles may not change at all, while others may slowly disappear over time.

What Causes a Mole?
Moles occur when cells in the skin grow in a cluster instead of being spread throughout the skin. These cells are called melanocytes, and they make the pigment that gives skin its natural color. Moles may darken after exposure to the sun, during the teen years, and during pregnancy

I hope this helps put your mind at ease. Have a nice day.
H.

I would get it checked out.

I would get him to a dermatologist right away. GPs sometimes miss things. Moles can change very quickly. My family and I get checked yearly. Even children can get melanoma. The best dermatologist in the area is Joy Jester. She is great with kids and adults. She will remove the moles in the office on your first visit. That has been really helpful with the kids. It is better to be safe than sorry. She has also been a great help with excema and cradle cap.

You may want to google "atypical mole syndrome" or clark's nevus.

Good luck.

Hi R. I've never had this problem with my children, but since more moles have occurred since you took him to the doctor, I would take him back for further evalucation. Just to be on the safe side.

If your concerned, call your doctor and ask if it something they would want to see him for. I would think that is a little unusual so they'd want to see it, but I'm not a doctor ;) I hope everything is okay!

My 6 yr old also has developed some small dark raised moles in the past yr. I asked the Dr. and asked other Drs in the practice if I happen to see someone diff and they all tell me the same thing....normal but if one appears that is a funny color (not even) or has undefined edges or grows at a rapid rate then to be concerned. If the edges are smooth and it seems contained, its nothing but a mole. If you think its something or need piece of mind, see a derm.

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