4 answers

Neonatal Mastitis

Does anyone have any experience with this? This is what it looks like my 3 week old daughter has. Is it painful to babies? What is done to treat it? She is going to see the doctor about it, but any information to tide a worried mom over until then would be greatly appreciaed. Thanks in advance!

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

Go figure, that the morning we wake up to go to the doctor, her chest is no longer red. It was still swollen and still had a large area under her skin that was rock hard, but that, too, had nearly gone away by the time we got to the doctor. I felt like one of those over-paranoid moms, but I'd rather look that way than have something wrong with my baby girl! Thanks so much for the reassurances!

More Answers

Jen i apologize. After reading the other responses I had to go back and reread you original message. I read mastoiditis which is what I had. You wrote mastitis. Again I apologize if my response seemed to be inappropriate
I am 48 and had mastitis last fall. They talked about doing surgery on me but was able to find an antibiotic that cleared it up. It can be very serious and lead to other complications but you seem to be on top of things. Listen to your doctor, and things should go alright.

NEVER HEARD OF IT BUT DID SOME RESEARCH AND I FOUND THIS, HOPE IT HELPS.

Forty-one cases of neonatal mastitis seen at Children's Hospital, Boston since 1947 have been analyzed and the literature since 1950 reviewed. All 41, like those in the literature, occurred in full-term infants 1-5 weeks of age, with a sex ratio of 2:1 (females:males). Bilaterality was rare (3) cases in this series, one in the literature review) and systemic spread or extramammary foci even rarer. The incidence has changed little in the past 35 years except for the larger number of cases in the 1950s. In the present series, all but a few cases have been caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and gram-negative enteric bacilli have not been seen. Therapy is surgical incision and drainage when fluctuance is present, but early treatment with appropriate intravenous antibiotics has apparently obviated the need for surgery in many recent cases. The prognosis for cure of the infection is excellent.

A couple of my kids had fluid build up in their breasts when they were a few weeks old. Never to the point of infection though. I was told to use warm wash cloths and light pressure to help relieve it. After a couple weeks it went away. It wasn't from breastfeeding, but from the hormones that passed through to baby during pregnancy. If she has a fever she'll likely need antibiotics to clear it up, but otherwise it should clear up soon. AS far as it being painful for babies, I would imagine it is uncomfortable if she gets bumped. I had mastitis twice and it does hurt, but it's from the pressure mostly. She should be better soon, but see the doctor definately just in case. Good luck and happy baby.

When my daughter was born after breastfeeding her for a few days her tiny boobies were filling up with milk,they monitored her closely told me it was normal for this to happen to breastfeed babies it happens to boys to.I asked the breastfeeding nurse if it can be excreted through pinching her nipple to make sure that is what it was and she did tiny drops of milk came out which I was relieved.After a few months of weaning her off I started to get severe breast pains this was monhts on end I was terrifeid to see my dr. so I let it go and dealt with the pain it becaome so bad I had to go in I was losing my mind.They really never mentioned mastits but I had 2 sonograms to rule out cancer and tumors finally one other dr. took a sample of my breast milk and sent it to pathology sure enough no cancer cells Thank God but an infection in the mamory gland they were unclear if it had progressed to staph was put on anitbiotics and that cleared it up.As for a baby i'm sure it is painful when women talk about it when it develops as they are nurseing they get a fever swelling of the breast and it is tender to the touch,they advise to give warm baths and either warm packs or cold on the area along with Tylenol.

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