74 answers

Needing Advice About My 23 Month Old Son

I have a 23 month old son, turning 2 in April, Who hasn't started talking yet. He babbles alot and says things, but not Words. He's very affectionate and funny. He loves playing With his older brother, Who is turning 10 in April. My niece started talking at 15 Months old, so I aM concerned. I've heard that it's norMal, so if anyone has any advice for Me, or been through the saMe thing I'd appreciate it.

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

Thanks for all the responses. I feel alot better now. He has his 2 year old physical next Month, so I will get some info there. Thanks again everyone!

Featured Answers

I am a Speech-Language Pathologist - I suggest having his hearing evaluated by an Audiologist to see what if any problems he may have with his hearing.

2nd - does he have to talk to have his needs/wants met? If not, he will not be compelled to use any kind of speech to communicate as long as he can point or cry to get what he wants.

3rd - have him evaluated by a Speech-Language Pathologist as soon as possible - they will be able to help you not only with what he should/could be doing by now but how to facilitate language.

4th feel free to contact me with any questions at ____@____.com.

Thanks,
J.

1 mom found this helpful

My youngest son didn't really talk until around the 2yr mark either. His problem was that his older brother was talking for him. If I asked him if he was hungry, big brother would say "yes he wants chicken" I finally had to start telling big brother to hush and make the baby tell me what he wanted. He's 7 now and never shuts up!(hahahaha)

L.,

I know that some will tell you not to worry, that it's normal, and just wait.

Get a hearing test for him. Go to an otolarygologist, also call ENT for Ear Nose and Throat. Or try an audiologist if the otolarygologist doesn't have one. Once anything physical has been ruled out, try a speech pathologist. There may even be a good educational product to use. Try to eliminate unnecessary clatter and noises in the house. Also try singing and getting him to sing. Singing helped me to achieve excellent pronunciation in Spanish and made me less reserved in speaking it to people.

Hope this helps a little. Good luck.

In Amazon sisterhood,
B. Williams

More Answers

I'm a little worried b/c most of the advise I am reading is for you not to "worry". When my son was not talking (only babbling and a couple of sounds) I kept insisting something was wrong. I was told by the dr and everyone else that he'll talk when he's ready. I heard it all, "He doesn't need to talk b/c you talk for him," "James Earl Jones didn't talk until he was almost 4",yadda yadda yadda. I finally had enough and took matters into my own hands. I called ECI and had him evaluated, in addition I had his hearing checked. BINGO. He had a hearing loss. I wouldn't wait very long to have his hearing checked b/c every month is so crucial in their early years. My son wound up getting ear surgery and being in Speech Therapy for the next 3 years to compensate for my delayed reaction. I can't help but think that if I had gone w/my instincts in the very beginning (around 18 mos.) instead of listening to everyone else than I would have saved him a lot of frustration (and hard work in speech).

1 mom found this helpful

Remember that every child is different, and every child learns at their own pace... I am telling you as a special ed preschool teacher that lots of children do not speak until they are 2 years old or even 3 in some cases... However you will probably notice that your child is more developed in the mental(cognitive & motor skills) parts-likes to play games, build puzzles, lots of hands on stuff and probably catches on really quickly. While other children tend to begin talking and do not advance in the motor skills until later, and there are some that balance and develope everything together(rare)- again though it is not fair to your child to compare them to anyone else in the family or any other child for that matter...I read through a lot of the responses wrote by other moms that had something wrong with their child, I am not saying that it is bad advice to go and have your childs hearing tested however most doctors will have you wait till age 4 and they will test their eye sight as well, just don't get all scared because a few of these women had children that did have children that needed a little extra help. I would consider these things before worrying about the childs ears as being a problem-does your child constantly get ear aches? pull at their ears? while your child is playing-(do this from behind) drop something heavy and again later something just loud(pan lid)do it near and in another room and watch and see if your child gives a reaction... Also talk to your child, call them to you from another room in a regular voice-don't yell.. does he respond- these are all ways to test his hearing at home, If your child is reacting to up close sounds and sounds from far chances are there is nothing wrong with their hearing and it is developmental, if you DO NOT get a response then take him to the doctor and explain why you think he needs to have his hearing checked, explain what you did at home... Otherwise if you get reactions from most of these do not worry at this time, they are who they are, and if you start pushing learning in a neg way now it will only limit them later. Children learn through play, Its how they get their personality, However a suggestion that could help improve his talking skills- start singing songs with him, play the radio, turn on sesame street or another PBS show-let him hear the different sounds so that he can mimmick, do itsy spider and teapot so he learns the movements, join a play group, preschool class- this will help him to interact with other children his age, allow him to begin mimicking other sounds, learn songs, and lots of other verbal and nonverbal skills.. As a preschool teacher and a parent, I noticed that children whom participated in playgroups outside of preschool had better communication skills than children whom stayed home with parents and siblings all day. **Oh an if it helps my son didn't start talking until he was almost 3 ( he is bilingual)-now he won't stop-lol and my daughter starting babling at 2(bilingual also) and is 2 1/2 she is talking but I am the only one who understands what she is saying... Good Luck and don't worry!!! HE IS NORMAL!

1 mom found this helpful

I am a Speech-Language Pathologist - I suggest having his hearing evaluated by an Audiologist to see what if any problems he may have with his hearing.

2nd - does he have to talk to have his needs/wants met? If not, he will not be compelled to use any kind of speech to communicate as long as he can point or cry to get what he wants.

3rd - have him evaluated by a Speech-Language Pathologist as soon as possible - they will be able to help you not only with what he should/could be doing by now but how to facilitate language.

4th feel free to contact me with any questions at ____@____.com.

Thanks,
J.

1 mom found this helpful

Hi L. ---

I wouldn't worry about it - I have a 22mo son and he is the same way. There are more and more kids being born who are taking their time on talking. If he is otherwise healthy, funny and understands things and finds ways to communicate with you, then he's fine ----just be patient. I have talked to lots of moms about this and most of these kiddos start their words from age 2yrs to 3 yrs. Some don't really even talk till they are 4 and older if you can believe that - they just don't feel the need and are absolutely fine! There is also some recent evidence on these kids that they are highly intelligent thinkers! So they aren't focused on talking immediately - they are way too focused on thinking about their new life and all around them. And, from what I have heard, once they talk, you cannot shut them up so enjoy your quiet now while you can!!! lol

Important to know - you know your own child and stick with what you know and sense - the challenge for those of us parents with "different" kids is to have very thick skin from other parents who compare, judge or try and tell you that something is "wrong" with your child - i.e. autism, Sensory Integration Dysfunction,Dyslexia,Central Auditory Processing Disorder, ADD, ADHD, etc. etc. etc.... - Although it is important to be aware of these disorders there are so many children that just beat to a different drum these days and there is nothing wrong with them at all. In fact, these are the generation of kiddos who probably need to be alittle different, as they will have to think outside of the box to deal with all our issues in the world - these are kids who will grow up to make great changes in our planet! So if some of them are outside the norm - more power to them - don't judge them, just love them and enjoy them - they are so wonderful! I am sure your son is absolutely precious!

Alli

1 mom found this helpful

My son will be two i n april as well. he doesn't talk either. I am not concerned because I can tell that he is on his way to talking. he babbles and "talks" to us just as if he was saying words. You have to remember EVERY child is different. you cannot compare kids. It just doesn't work like that. If you are really worried I would take him to the hearing doctor and make sure his ears are working, other than that, in his own time he will develop those words... In the meantime enjoy him not talking :) Love the stage he's in because he will never be that age again!

My son didn't talk until he was three. I think that a lot of it had to do with the fact that his older sister talked for him. If he wanted something she would figure it out and go get it. Also, he was quietly taking things in. He understood everything that was said to him and had things figured out. You need to make sure that everyone in the family is making HIM communicate what it is that he needs with his words. Say, "use your words.". Be patient, however because he hasn't began talking yet, forming the words properly will take quite some time.

Mother of 4. 10, 7, 6, and 3.

We went through the same thing with our youngest son (now 5). As soon as a child is 3 yrs old, you can go through the school for speech, etc. Before that, here in Baytown, we went through ECI (Early Childhood Intervention). It is through the United Way program. They came to our home (his space) and did all kinds of games to test him. They ended up coming to our home every week for about 6 months. While there, they played games. It didn't seem like they were doing anything more than playing, but within 6 months, he had an incredible vocabulary.... from 2 words at 2 years. We were beginning to think he was autistic. We also went through testing simultaneously at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston. I would first begin by talking to his pedi. Since he's 23 months, he's almost due for his 2nd year appointment. I would talk to them about appropriate milestones - keeping in mind that boys mature slower. Although Thomas had several red flags for autism (had words then lost them, lack of words, behaviors, etc.), I am beginning to think it just wasn't his time yet. He is now 5 and doesn't need speech therapy, he is talking just fine.

Good luck and God bless,
K.
Mom to 2 wonderful boys, 7 & 5.

L.,

I know that some will tell you not to worry, that it's normal, and just wait.

Get a hearing test for him. Go to an otolarygologist, also call ENT for Ear Nose and Throat. Or try an audiologist if the otolarygologist doesn't have one. Once anything physical has been ruled out, try a speech pathologist. There may even be a good educational product to use. Try to eliminate unnecessary clatter and noises in the house. Also try singing and getting him to sing. Singing helped me to achieve excellent pronunciation in Spanish and made me less reserved in speaking it to people.

Hope this helps a little. Good luck.

In Amazon sisterhood,
B. Williams

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